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Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephon

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Re: Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephon  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2018, 22:45
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Hi! As I mentioned, the doubts that you have, have nothing to with the following rule:

Object of the preposition can't be subject in a given clause.

The doubts that you have (in your last post as well as in this one), are related to the following question:

Can a pronoun ("it" in this case) refer to an object of a prepositional phrase?

As I mentioned, the answer is yes.

The last question that you posted (Marconi..) and the latest question that you have posted (the intricate structure...), both testify this, since in both cases, the pronoun it in both sentences, is referring to the noun in the prepositional phrase.

Meaning is indeed, the best way to go in SC.
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Re: Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephon  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2018, 03:37
Quote:
Marconi's conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation; instead, it is precisely the opposite, a tool for communicating with a large, public audience.


(A) Marconi's conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation; instead, it is

(B) Marconi conceived of the radio as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, but which is

(C) Marconi conceived of the radio as a tool for private conversation that could substitute for the telephone; instead, it has become

(D) Marconi conceived of the radio to be a tool for private conversation, a substitute for the telephone, which has become

(E) Marconi conceived of the radio to be a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, other than what it is,

EducationAisle wrote:
AsadAbu wrote:
Hi Expert,
In C, ''it'' has been used for ''Radio''. Here, ''radio'' is the object of preposition ''of''. As far I know, object of the preposition can't be subject anymore in the sentence. If the red part makes sense, why ''it'' has been used as antecedent of ''radio''?
Thanks__

Hi AsadAbu, you might be mixing two things here.

Object of the preposition can't be subject in a given clause. That clause in this sentence is:

Marconi conceived of the radio as a tool for private conversation that could substitute for the telephone

However, we cannot apply this rule across clauses.

In option C, instead, it has become... marks the start of a new Independent clause. So, we cannot apply the prepositional phrase rule in this clause (simply because we don't have the prepositional phrase in this clause; the prepositional phrase was in the previous clause).

The question you perhaps want to ask is:

Can a pronoun (it in this case) refer to an object of a prepositional phrase? The answer is yes. There are numerous such instances in various official examples.

Thanks for your feedback EducationAisle.
There're 3 object of a prepositional phrase in the correct choice in the first clause (e.g., private conversation, the telephone, the radio). so, my question is that how do someone know that the it doesn't refer to the other 2 object of a prepositional phrase namely private conversation and the radio
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New post 27 Oct 2018, 02:57
I'd go with C, but in fact I'd rather not use "it" here as it causes confusion that whether radio or telephone is being referred. However, when it comes to the meaning, C is the best choice

(C) Marconi conceived of the radio as a tool for private conversation that could substitute for the telephone; instead, it has become
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New post 29 Mar 2019, 12:19
Hello Everyone!

This is another tricky GMAT question, so let's tackle it one problem at a time. To start, here is the original question, with any major differences between the options highlighted in orange:

Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation; instead, it is precisely the opposite, a tool for communicating with a large, public audience.

(A) Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation; instead, it is
(B) Marconi conceived of the radio as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, but which is
(C) Marconi conceived of the radio as a tool for private conversation that could substitute for the telephone; instead, it has become
(D) Marconi conceived of the radio to be a tool for private conversation, a substitute for the telephone, which has become
(E) Marconi conceived of the radio to be a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, other than what it is,

There are a few things we can focus on here:

1. Marconi's conception of / Marconi conceived of (Meaning/Clarity)
2. as / to be (Idiom)
3. Endings (Punctuation/Conjunctions/Meaning)


Since #2 on our list will create an "either/or" split, let's start there. No matter which one we choose, it will eliminate 2-3 options right away. This is an issue of idioms! Here is how this particular idiom works:

conceive X as Y = CORRECT
conceive X to be Y = WRONG

So let's see how each option handles this idiom and eliminate the ones that use the wrong structure:

(A) Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation; instead, it is --> OK (doesn't use the idiom)
(B) Marconi conceived of the radio as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, but which is --> OK
(C) Marconi conceived of the radio as a tool for private conversation that could substitute for the telephone; instead, it has become --> OK
(D) Marconi conceived of the radio to be a tool for private conversation, a substitute for the telephone, which has become --> WRONG
(E) Marconi conceived of the radio to be a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, other than what it is, --> WRONG

We can eliminate options D & E because they don't use the idiom "conceived X as Y" properly.

Now, let's go back to #1 on our list: Marconi's conception of vs. Marconi conceived of. This is an issue of clarity and meaning, so let's see which one works best:

(A) Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation; instead, it is

This is INCORRECT because it slightly changes the intended meaning. This sentence says that the conception of the radio is a substitute for the telephone, not the radio itself. Since this isn't as clear as stating that Marconi created the radio, let's rule it out.

(B) Marconi conceived of the radio as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, but which is

(C) Marconi conceived of the radio as a tool for private conversation that could substitute for the telephone; instead, it has become

Let's eliminate option A because it changes the intended meaning.

Now that we're left with only 2 options, let's take a look at both options with the non-underlined parts added in and see if we can spot any problems:

(B) Marconi conceived of the radio as a substitute for the telephone, a tool for private conversation, but which is precisely the opposite, a tool for communicating with a large, public audience.

This is INCORRECT because it contains a misleading/misplaced modifier! The phrase "but which is precisely the opposite" SHOULD modify the word "radio." However, the ways this is worded, it actually modifies "telephone," which isn't what we're trying to say is "precisely the opposite" here.

(C) Marconi conceived of the radio as a tool for private conversation that could substitute for the telephone; instead, it has become precisely the opposite, a tool for communicating with a large, public audience.

This is CORRECT! It's clear how this is written that the phrase "it has become precisely the opposite" is referring back to the radio. We also don't have any other issues with meaning, modifiers, or punctuation.


There you have it - option C is the correct choice!


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Marconi’s conception of the radio was as a substitute for the telephon   [#permalink] 29 Mar 2019, 12:19

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