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New laws make it easier to patent just about anything

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New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2017, 23:45
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Question Stats:

30% (01:18) correct 70% (01:17) wrong based on 207 sessions

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New laws make it easier to patent just about anything, from parts of the human genome to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Commentators are concerned about the implications of allowing patents for things that can hardly be described as “inventions.” However, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office believes that allowing for strong copyright and patent protections fosters the kind of investment in research and development needed to spur innovation.

Which of the following can be properly inferred from the statements above?

(A) It was not possible in the past to patent something as common as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
(B) The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is more interested in business profits than in true innovation.
(C) Investment in research and development is often needed to spur innovation.
(D) The human genome is part of nature and shouldn’t be patented.
(E) Commentators who are concerned about too many patents aren’t very well informed.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2017, 03:07
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Not convinced how it is A!

The argument says "New laws make it easier ...... to patent .....peanut butter and jelly sandwich". Nowhere it is said that "It was not possible ... to patent .....peanut butter and jelly sandwich."

It might happened that in the past patent was possible but not easier.

I don't see anything wrong with option C.

Anyone to help me?
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Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2017, 10:39
can sum1 plz shed light on this question. i opted my answer as b.
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Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 11 May 2017, 18:37
rohan2345 wrote:
New laws make it easier to patent just about anything, from parts of the human genome to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Commentators are concerned about the implications of allowing patents for things that can hardly be described as “inventions.” However, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office believes that allowing for strong copyright and patent protections fosters the kind of investment in research and development needed to spur innovation.

Which of the following can be properly inferred from the statements above?

(A) It was not possible in the past to patent something as common as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
(B) The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is more interested in business profits than in true innovation.
(C) Investment in research and development is often needed to spur innovation.
(D) The human genome is part of nature and shouldn’t be patented.
(E) Commentators who are concerned about too many patents aren’t very well informed.


I went for C as well..
the argument is saying that news laws make it easier to get patent--- earlier it was difficult to get patent but not impossible ...
Expert please advice.
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New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2017, 02:25
(A) It was not possible in the past to patent something as common as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Keep it side.

(B) The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is more interested in business profits than in true innovation. Incorrect

(C) Investment in research and development is often needed to spur innovation. Keep it side

(D) The human genome is part of nature and shouldn’t be patented.Incorrect

(E) Commentators who are concerned about too many patents aren’t very well informed.Incorrect

NOW between A and C

Patent and Trademark Office believes that allowing for strong copyright and patent protections fosters the kind of investment in research and development needed to spur innovation.

(C) Investment in research and development is often needed to spur innovation. is already given in the argument hence wrong.

so ans is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A


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New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 04:08
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I don't agree with the OA.Clearly the two contenders are A and C. the reason i ruled out A was because of the premise "New Laws make it easier " we cannot conclude that it wasnt possible just that it wasnt easy as it is now.
C seems more likely. Experts your views on this please

sayantanc2k , chetan2u

Last edited by goforgmat on 30 Jun 2017, 04:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 04:09
Mahmud6 wrote:
Not convinced how it is A!

The argument says "New laws make it easier ...... to patent .....peanut butter and jelly sandwich". Nowhere it is said that "It was not possible ... to patent .....peanut butter and jelly sandwich."

It might happened that in the past patent was possible but not easier.

I don't see anything wrong with option C.

Anyone to help me?

Same reasoning as well, lets see what experts have to say.
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Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2017, 05:00
IMO, the option C states something that has already been mentioned in the text, hence, this is not an inference. Left with the option A.
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Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 13:58
goforgmat wrote:
Mahmud6 wrote:
Not convinced how it is A!

The argument says "New laws make it easier ...... to patent .....peanut butter and jelly sandwich". Nowhere it is said that "It was not possible ... to patent .....peanut butter and jelly sandwich."

It might happened that in the past patent was possible but not easier.

I don't see anything wrong with option C.

Anyone to help me?

Same reasoning as well, lets see what experts have to say.


This question appears to be from an unofficial source (GMAT for Dummies), so I wouldn't worry too much about it!
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Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2017, 02:25
guptarahul wrote:
(A) It was not possible in the past to patent something as common as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Keep it side.

(B) The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is more interested in business profits than in true innovation. Incorrect

(C) Investment in research and development is often needed to spur innovation. Keep it side

(D) The human genome is part of nature and shouldn’t be patented.Incorrect

(E) Commentators who are concerned about too many patents aren’t very well informed.Incorrect

NOW between A and C

Patent and Trademark Office believes that allowing for strong copyright and patent protections fosters the kind of investment in research and development needed to spur innovation.

(C) Investment in research and development is often needed to spur innovation. is already given in the argument hence wrong.

so ans is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A


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Is it an Assumption Question? No.
Since it is an inference question we can rephrase anything already stated in the argument.
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Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2018, 15:38
rohan2345 wrote:
New laws make it easier to patent just about anything, from parts of the human genome to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Commentators are concerned about the implications of allowing patents for things that can hardly be described as “inventions.” However, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office believes that allowing for strong copyright and patent protections fosters the kind of investment in research and development needed to spur innovation.

Which of the following can be properly inferred from the statements above?

(A) It was not possible in the past to patent something as common as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
(B) The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is more interested in business profits than in true innovation.
(C) Investment in research and development is often needed to spur innovation.
(D) The human genome is part of nature and shouldn’t be patented.
(E) Commentators who are concerned about too many patents aren’t very well informed.


the word "often" in C is making it an unacceptable answer choice. Hence, A
Re: New laws make it easier to patent just about anything   [#permalink] 04 Feb 2018, 15:38
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