GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Nov 2018, 04:09

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • All GMAT Club Tests are Free and open on November 22nd in celebration of Thanksgiving Day!

     November 22, 2018

     November 22, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Mark your calendars - All GMAT Club Tests are free and open November 22nd to celebrate Thanksgiving Day! Access will be available from 0:01 AM to 11:59 PM, Pacific Time (USA)
  • Free lesson on number properties

     November 23, 2018

     November 23, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Feb 2015
Posts: 48
Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Sep 2015, 08:46
8
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 45 sessions

36% (03:42) correct 64% (03:34) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 65 sessions

57% (01:08) correct 43% (01:46) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 62 sessions

48% (01:15) correct 52% (01:20) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 4
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 60 sessions

35% (01:12) correct 65% (01:16) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 62 sessions

44% (01:02) correct 56% (01:09) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 53 sessions

34% (01:07) correct 66% (01:18) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race, but its effects are different. Before the arrival of white men in the New World, the inhabitants of North america lived quietly in the woods, enduring the vicissitudes and practicing the virtues and vices common to the savage nations. The Europeans, having dispersed the Indian tribes and driven them into the deserts, condemned them to a wandering life, full of inexpressible sufferings.

Savage nations are only controlled by opinion and custom. When the North American Indians had lost the sentiment of attachment to their country; when their families were dispersed, their traditions obscured, and the chain of their recollections broken; when all their habits were changed, and their wants increased beyond measure, European tyranny rendered them more disorderly and less civilized than they were before. The moral and physical condition of these tribes grew worse, and they became more wretched. Nevertheless, the Europeans have not been able to change the character of the Indians; and though they have had the power to destroy, they have never been able to subdue and civilize them.

The lot of the Negro is placed on the extreme limit of servitude, while that of the Indian lies on the utmost verge of liberty; and slavery does not produce more fatal effects upon the first than independence upon the second. The Negro has lost all property in his own person, and he cannot dispose of his existence without committing a sort of fraud. But the savage is his own master as soon as he is able to act; parental authority is scarcely known to him; he has never bent his will to that of any of his kind, nor learned the difference between voluntary obedience and shameful subjection; and the very name of law is unknown to him. As he delights in this barbarous independence and would rather perish than sacrifice the least part of it, civilization has little hold over him.

The Negro makes a thousand fruitless efforts to insinuate himself among men who repulse him; he conforms to the taste of his oppressors, adopts their opinions, and hopes by imitating them to form a part of their community. Having been told from infancy that his race is naturally inferior to that of the whites, he ascents to the proposition and is ashamed of his own nature. In each of his features, he discovers a trace of slavery, and if it were in his power, he would willingly rid himself of everything that makes him what he is.

The Indian, on the contrary has his imagination inflated with the pretended nobility of his origin, and lives and dies in the midst of these dreams of pride. Far from desiring to conform his habits to ours, he loves his savage life as the distinguishing mark of his race and repels every advance to civilization, less, perhaps, from hatred of it than from a dread of resembling the Europeans.

While he has nothing to oppose to our perfection in the arts but the resources of the wilderness, to our tactics nothing but undisciplined, while our well-digested plans are met only by spontaneous instincts of savage life, who can wonder if he fails in this unequal contest?

The Negro, who earnestly desires to mingle his race with that of the European, cannot do so, while the Indian, who might succeed to a certain extent, disclaims to make the attempt. The servility of the one dooms him to slavery, the pride of the other to death.

1. As inferred from the passage, the Negro

(a) though born a slave was still happy in his life of servitude
(b) had no greater aspiration than to be accepted by the Europeans
(c) sought to imitate his master in order to secure his freedom
(d) has been brainwashed into believing his concomitant subordination
(e) had no pride in his individuality or identity as he was ignorant of his history

2. Which of the following is not in line with the author's comparison of the Negro and the Indian?

(a) Both suffered tyranny that though different originated from the same author
(b) While the one became servile, the other refused to bow even at the cost of his own life
(c) While the one admired his oppressor and sought to be like him, the other spurned civilization
(d) While oppression caused one to despise himself, it could not quell the fierce pride of the other
(e) The differences in their attitudes helped to save one and became fatal to the other

3. According to the author, all of the following were the effects of European despotism on the Indians EXCEPT

(a) The bond that held them together was broken and they become isolated
(b) They became more unruly and barbaric as the glue of custom and tradition was lost
(c) They were forced into submission by the need to get their basic requirements
(d) They were forced to roam around in inhospitable terrain facing a lot of hardship
(e) As their habits were changed, they began to desire new things that they could not afford

4. Regarding the conflict between the Europeans and the Indians, the author opines that

(a) it was an unequal match, tilted heavily against the Indians
(b) if the Indiand had been a little more like the Negros, then peace would have prevailed in the continent
(c) all efforts taken by the Whites to bridge the gap was rejected by the Indians
(d) the Indians hated the Europeans and refused to have anything to do with them
(e) the only admirable quality in the Indian was his refusal to bow down in the face of adversity

5. The passage

(a) is critical of the Europeans for the misery they inflicted on the other races
(b) delineates how the future of a race is determined by its historical past
(c) analyses the history of the U.S. to account for the condition of the races as it is today
(d) examines dispassionately the relationship between three major races in the U.S. in a historical context
(e) seeks to account for the emergence of the whites as the dominant race in the U.S.

6. Which of the following points to the irony of the race relations as depicted by the author?

(a) Neither the extreme submissiveness of one, nor the fierce independence of the other benefited them
(b) Both the desire to please and the desire to oppose was doomed
(c) The one who sought to ingratiate was repulsed while the one who spurned was sought after
(d) One accepted slavery as an attendant of birth, the other loved freedom more than his life
(e) The one who wanted to identify with the rulers could not do so while the other who could have, did not want to do so.

MBA Section Director
User avatar
D
Affiliations: GMATClub
Joined: 22 May 2017
Posts: 1021
Concentration: Nonprofit
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Oct 2018, 18:18

+1 kudos to the posts containing answer explanations of all questions


_________________

New project wSTAT(which Schools To Apply To?)

B-School app with GRE

New - RC Butler - 2 RC's everyday

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Feb 2018
Posts: 16
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Oct 2018, 07:46
1
1. As inferred from the passage, the Negro:

(a) though born a slave was still happy in his life of servitude
(b) had no greater aspiration than to be accepted by the Europeans
(c) sought to imitate his master in order to secure his freedom
(d) has been brainwashed into believing his concomitant subordination
(e) had no pride in his individuality or identity as he was ignorant of his history

Only D has a similar reference in the passage:

Having been told from infancy that his race is naturally inferior to that of the whites

2. Which of the following is not in line with the author's comparison of the Negro and the Indian?
(a) Both suffered tyranny that though different originated from the same author
(b) While the one became servile, the other refused to bow even at the cost of his own life
(c) While the one admired his oppressor and sought to be like him, the other spurned civilization
(d) While oppression caused one to despise himself, it could not quell the fierce pride of the other
(e) The differences in their attitudes helped to save one and became fatal to the other

E - There is no mention in the passage that Negros or Indians were 'saved'
The last paragraph goes as far as saying "The servility of the one dooms him to slavery, the pride of the other to death"



3. According to the author, all of the following were the effects of European despotism on the Indians EXCEPT

(a) The bond that held them together was broken and they become isolated
(b) They became more unruly and barbaric as the glue of custom and tradition was lost
(c) They were forced into submission by the need to get their basic requirements
(d) They were forced to roam around in inhospitable terrain facing a lot of hardship
(e) As their habits were changed, they began to desire new things that they could not afford

Correct answer: C As the others have references in the passage

4. Regarding the conflict between the Europeans and the Indians, the author opines that

(a) it was an unequal match, tilted heavily against the Indians
(b) if the Indiand had been a little more like the Negros, then peace would have prevailed in the continent
(c) all efforts taken by the Whites to bridge the gap was rejected by the Indians
(d) the Indians hated the Europeans and refused to have anything to do with them
(e) the only admirable quality in the Indian was his refusal to bow down in the face of adversity

A - who can wonder if he fails in this unequal contest?

5. The passage

(a) is critical of the Europeans for the misery they inflicted on the other races
(b) delineates how the future of a race is determined by its historical past
(c) analyses the history of the U.S. to account for the condition of the races as it is today
(d) examines dispassionately the relationship between three major races in the U.S. in a historical context
(e) seeks to account for the emergence of the whites as the dominant race in the U.S

This is the primary purpose of the passage - We can strike out A as the author does not primarily talk about European opression
B can be struck out - has no clear mention of the past of a race is dilineated
C The piece is not a historical account of events
E The author has not referred to the Indian refusal as 'admirable'

6. Which of the following points to the irony of the race relations as depicted by the author?

(a) Neither the extreme submissiveness of one, nor the fierce independence of the other benefited them
(b) Both the desire to please and the desire to oppose was doomed
(c) The one who sought to ingratiate was repulsed while the one who spurned was sought after
(d) One accepted slavery as an attendant of birth, the other loved freedom more than his life
(e) The one who wanted to identify with the rulers could not do so while the other who could have, did not want to do so.

A - The servility of the one dooms him to slavery, the pride of the other to death.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 02 Sep 2018
Posts: 66
Location: United States
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Oct 2018, 08:35
1
hargun3045 , workout, Diwakar003,

I didn't quite follow the choice D. I understand that para compares all three races, but definitely NOT dispassionately.
Author used very vivid, sometimes poetic and more of literary language in describing the races and their conditions. I didn't find it dispassionate. Could you please explain?


5. The passage

(a) is critical of the Europeans for the misery they inflicted on the other races
(b) delineates how the future of a race is determined by its historical past
(c) analyses the history of the U.S. to account for the condition of the races as it is today
(d) examines
Quote:
dispassionately
the relationship between three major races in the U.S. in a historical context

(e) seeks to account for the emergence of the whites as the dominant race in the U.S
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 14 May 2016
Posts: 15
Schools: INSEAD Jan '20
Premium Member
Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 19 Oct 2018, 03:07
workout Prajat

In question 5, how is (d) examines dispassionately the relationship between three major races in the U.S. in a historical context
the correct answer?
There are numerous strong adjectives and colorful descriptions that show a lot of passion on the author's part...

Originally posted by KM666 on 18 Oct 2018, 08:55.
Last edited by KM666 on 19 Oct 2018, 03:07, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 06 Feb 2018
Posts: 16
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Oct 2018, 02:26
I may be wrong but D seemed the 'least' wrong of the 5

5. The passage

(a) is critical of the Europeans for the misery they inflicted on the other races - Although the misery inflicted upon by Europeans was the theme, it didn't seem like the focus of the piece. It was more about Indians, Negros, and their attitudes.
(b) delineates how the future of a race is determined by its historical past - It wasn't a historical account, the author made his opinions very clear, subject to his assessment.
(c) analyses the history of the U.S. to account for the condition of the races as it is today - Same as B, no historical facts 'analyzed' - He did drop them from time to time to give context - but the spotlight was on race attitudes (Negros pleasing whites, whites trying to 'civilize' Indians, Indians not wanting to be whites)
(d) examines dispassionately the relationship between three major races in the U.S. in a historical context - Dispassionate put me off, I wouldn't use that word to describe the passage, but I kept this option because he does 'examine' the relationships of the three races
(e) seeks to account for the emergence of the whites as the dominant race in the U.S. - Again, although yes, the whites emerged as the dominant race, it wasn't the primary concern of the passage. Last line again emphasizes that the author is primarily concerned with accounting for the doom of the other races given their attitudes toward the whites.

My take. Hope it helps!
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 02 Aug 2015
Posts: 115
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Oct 2018, 00:31
1
Cinematiccuisine wrote:
I didn't quite follow the choice D. I understand that para compares all three races, but definitely NOT dispassionately.
Author used very vivid, sometimes poetic and more of literary language in describing the races and their conditions. I didn't find it dispassionate. Could you please explain?

5. The passage
(d) examines
Quote:
dispassionately
the relationship between three major races in the U.S. in a historical context



Hey Cinematiccuisine,

My take is this; though the author uses poetic and strong words to describe the conditions of Indians and Negro, he is not taking any sides in his comparisons. The author is portraying the pains and difficulties faced by Indians and Negros with same tonality. He remains fairly neutral in his tone till the conclusion. May be that's why we can infer that the author is dispassionate in his comparison.

Cheers!
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 143
Concentration: Finance, Economics
WE: Corporate Finance (Commercial Banking)
CAT Tests
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2018, 08:55
hargun3045 wrote:
1. As inferred from the passage, the Negro:

(a) though born a slave was still happy in his life of servitude
(b) had no greater aspiration than to be accepted by the Europeans
(c) sought to imitate his master in order to secure his freedom
(d) has been brainwashed into believing his concomitant subordination
(e) had no pride in his individuality or identity as he was ignorant of his history

Only D has a similar reference in the passage:

Having been told from infancy that his race is naturally inferior to that of the whites

2. Which of the following is not in line with the author's comparison of the Negro and the Indian?
(a) Both suffered tyranny that though different originated from the same author
(b) While the one became servile, the other refused to bow even at the cost of his own life
(c) While the one admired his oppressor and sought to be like him, the other spurned civilization
(d) While oppression caused one to despise himself, it could not quell the fierce pride of the other
(e) The differences in their attitudes helped to save one and became fatal to the other

E - There is no mention in the passage that Negros or Indians were 'saved'
The last paragraph goes as far as saying "The servility of the one dooms him to slavery, the pride of the other to death"



3. According to the author, all of the following were the effects of European despotism on the Indians EXCEPT

(a) The bond that held them together was broken and they become isolated
(b) They became more unruly and barbaric as the glue of custom and tradition was lost
(c) They were forced into submission by the need to get their basic requirements
(d) They were forced to roam around in inhospitable terrain facing a lot of hardship
(e) As their habits were changed, they began to desire new things that they could not afford

Correct answer: C As the others have references in the passage

4. Regarding the conflict between the Europeans and the Indians, the author opines that

(a) it was an unequal match, tilted heavily against the Indians
(b) if the Indiand had been a little more like the Negros, then peace would have prevailed in the continent
(c) all efforts taken by the Whites to bridge the gap was rejected by the Indians
(d) the Indians hated the Europeans and refused to have anything to do with them
(e) the only admirable quality in the Indian was his refusal to bow down in the face of adversity

A - who can wonder if he fails in this unequal contest?

5. The passage

(a) is critical of the Europeans for the misery they inflicted on the other races
(b) delineates how the future of a race is determined by its historical past
(c) analyses the history of the U.S. to account for the condition of the races as it is today
(d) examines dispassionately the relationship between three major races in the U.S. in a historical context
(e) seeks to account for the emergence of the whites as the dominant race in the U.S

This is the primary purpose of the passage - We can strike out A as the author does not primarily talk about European opression
B can be struck out - has no clear mention of the past of a race is dilineated
C The piece is not a historical account of events
E The author has not referred to the Indian refusal as 'admirable'

6. Which of the following points to the irony of the race relations as depicted by the author?

(a) Neither the extreme submissiveness of one, nor the fierce independence of the other benefited them
(b) Both the desire to please and the desire to oppose was doomed
(c) The one who sought to ingratiate was repulsed while the one who spurned was sought after
(d) One accepted slavery as an attendant of birth, the other loved freedom more than his life
(e) The one who wanted to identify with the rulers could not do so while the other who could have, did not want to do so.

A - The servility of the one dooms him to slavery, the pride of the other to death.



Hi !!
Why in 5 C , yo u have mentioned that this is not a historical account ? Does not the author work the passage from past to present ?
_________________

Even if it takes me 30 attempts, I am determined enough to score 740+ in my 31st attempt. This is it, this is what I have been waiting for, now is the time to get up and fight, for my life is 100% my responsibility.

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 143
Concentration: Finance, Economics
WE: Corporate Finance (Commercial Banking)
CAT Tests
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Nov 2018, 08:56
Was very tough to comprehend for me. Any more dense material to read on social sciences and american history. This is my weakness !
_________________

Even if it takes me 30 attempts, I am determined enough to score 740+ in my 31st attempt. This is it, this is what I have been waiting for, now is the time to get up and fight, for my life is 100% my responsibility.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 02 Sep 2018
Posts: 66
Location: United States
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2018, 08:59
ShankSouljaBoi wrote:
Was very tough to comprehend for me. Any more dense material to read on social sciences and american history. This is my weakness !


ShankSouljaBoi
There are many articles on gmat club. here are few of my favorites. Please give kudos.

A quick glance:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-best-rea ... l#p1232840

This is my fav:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/mba-books-go ... ml#p556920

Fiction:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/books-to-rea ... ml#p572735

For me, RC is more about practicing and reading daily. Good luck.
----
Please give kudos to my comment.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race &nbs [#permalink] 20 Nov 2018, 08:59
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Oppression has been no less fatal to the Indian than to the Negro race

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.