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Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part

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Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps by a meteor.

A the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps
B that the moon was formed from part of the Earth that had perhaps been dislodged
C that part of the Earth formed the moon, which was dislodged perhaps
D the moon was formed out of part of the Earth, having perhaps been dislodged
E that the moon had been formed from part of the Earth, which perhaps had been dislodged
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Divyadisha on 26 Jul 2016, 15:08, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2011, 00:04
My pick B
that needs to follow a reporting verb her suggest
Right usage of tense in B
dislodge happened before the moon formed

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2011, 07:58
The correct answer is C because of the need to use that and the relative pronoun touch-rule. Only in C, the relative pronoun which refers correctly to moon.
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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2011, 11:29
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B

Idiom: "suggest that"
C changes the meaning.
In E, there are not two events in different points in the time line of the past to use past perfect.

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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abhicoolmax wrote:
Hi fluke, thanks a lot for your explanation. Could you please explain why "having been ..." modifies moon? I want to learn the abstract concept you used to present your explanation. Thanks.


Some scientists suggest the moon was formed out of part of the Earth, having perhaps been dislodged by a meteor.

-ING form ALWAYS modifies the subject of the sentence touching it with COMMA unlike WHICH and other modifiers

Subject of "Some scientists suggest the moon was formed out of part of the Earth" - moon
so the sentence tells - Moon was dislodged by a meteor - does not make sense because moon did not even exist when meteor hit - So nonsense

the other errors: suggest that not there
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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2011, 21:07
abhicoolmax wrote:
fluke wrote:
agdimple333 wrote:
Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps by a meteor.
D) the moon was formed out of part of the Earth, having perhaps been dislodged
having been dislodged again indicates that the moon was dislodged.


Hi fluke, thanks a lot for your explanation. Could you please explain why "having been ..." modifies moon? I want to learn the abstract concept you used to present your explanation. Thanks.


Hi Abhicoolmax,
"Having + past participle" is special usage of participle and known as Perfect participle.
The perfect participle indicates completed action.

Here sentence mean that "When moon was formed out of part of Earth, the moon was already dislodged by meteor" which is wrong.

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Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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goodyear2013 wrote:
Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps by a meteor.

A) the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps
B) that the moon was formed from part of the Earth that had perhaps been dislodged
C) that part of the Earth formed the moon, which was dislodged perhaps
D) the moon was formed out of part of the Earth, having perhaps been dislodged
E) that the moon had been formed from part of the Earth, which perhaps had been dislodged

OE:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
"suggest that"-> E, C and E left
(B) CORRECT. This choice begins with “some scientists suggest that the moon was formed…” clearing up the confusion from the original sentence about what the scientists are suggesting. Second, this choice uses the preferred idiom “formed from.” The modifying phrase “that had perhaps been dislodged” correctly refers to “part of the Earth.”


Hi, can anyone explain about clearing up the confusion... from OE, please.




Guys,

Need to have more discussion on this Question.

I think this question is not good....

2 issues I have with this question....

The use of suggest (subjunctive verb) needs that +sub+ plural verb construction where as the correct ans B has a verb "was formed" which is Singular....hence cannot be correct. Option C does correct this error but then in C we have other issues

that part of the Earth formed the moon, which was dislodged perhaps....here which refers to moon and the sentence means that part of the earth formed the moon and the moon was dislodged perhaps by meteor....now which should ideally refer to part of the earth and not the moon....

What do you think let me know.....

Experts,please chip in

More discussion on this question some-scientists-suggest-the-moon-had-been-formed-out-of-part-116058.html#p938854
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Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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well.

First of all let me say that the question for me is good: at the first time it seems easy but indeed you need some brain power to disentagle.

Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps by a meteor.

A) the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps

X suggest ---> as soon as you see this, the question is : what ?? what they say. I immediatly think to THAT: we need a restrictive modifier because a priori the meaning of the sentence is: a part of something drifted away from this, going to form another corpus (the moon). That say, we need a resticted modifier to convey the scope of a general noun to a relevant subset. Basically, the other options also communicate that the entire earth took part in this process. And this is wrong: we have ONLY one part comes into the picture.

B) that the moon was formed from part of the Earth that had perhaps been dislodged

here we have the use of THAT correctly used. The sentence is parallel and the events, in their unfolding, are pretty much clear. CORRECT

C) that part of the Earth formed the moon, which was dislodged perhaps

her we have THAT + WHICH: thi is the worst scenario we could have. really far from home

D) the moon was formed out of part of the Earth, having perhaps been dislodged

same as A does + having (remember in general the use of having is really really bad on the gmat)

E) that the moon had been formed from part of the Earth, which perhaps had been dislodged

sama as C

This could comes in handy http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/that-vs-which-on-the-gmat/

Hope this helps
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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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carcass wrote:
well.

First of all let me say that the question for me is good: at the first time it seems easy but indeed you need some brain power to disentagle.

Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps by a meteor.

A) the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps

X suggest ---> as soon as you see this, the question is : what ?? what they say. I immediatly think to THAT: we need a restrictive modifier because a priori the meaning of the sentence is: a part of something drifted away from this, going to form another corpus (the moon). That say, we need a resticted modifier to convey the scope of a general noun to a relevant subset. Basically, the other options also communicate that the entire earth took part in this process. And this is wrong: we have ONLY one part comes into the picture.

B) that the moon was formed from part of the Earth that had perhaps been dislodged

here we have the use of THAT correctly used. The sentence is parallel and the events, in their unfolding, are pretty much clear. CORRECT

C) that part of the Earth formed the moon, which was dislodged perhaps

her we have THAT + WHICH: thi is the worst scenario we could have. really far from home

D) the moon was formed out of part of the Earth, having perhaps been dislodged

same as A does + having (remember in general the use of having is really really bad on the gmat)

E) that the moon had been formed from part of the Earth, which perhaps had been dislodged

sama as C

This could comes in handy http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/that-vs-which-on-the-gmat/

Hope this helps


The question was driving me crazy on my way back home and I got hold of Manhattan SC to understand the Subjunctive mood and I do like to change my views on this question...

Pg 112, Manhattan SC says that Command Subjunctive is used with certain Bossy verbs such as require or propose(can be used with to as well). BOSSY VERBS TELL PEOPLE TO DO THINGS

For Subjunctive verb the sentence structure is

Trigger word (Demand/Dictate/Insist/Mandate/Recommend/Request/Stipulate/Suggest)+ THAT+ Sub+ Plural verb (irrespective of the sub before the verb).

Now I had problem with option C precisely because of the verb used "was formed" which is Singular...hang on it should have been plural...

On Pg 115, MGMAT SC says that few Bossy verbs can be used in NON-BOSSY ways: Eg Her presence suggests that she is happy...In this context, suggests means "PROBABLY MEANS"....It is not acting bossy....

AS ALWAYS PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE MEANING...

Option C is out because which refers to moon and thus incorrect....


I am at peace now :sleep
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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2016, 07:35
daagh wrote:
The correct answer is C because of the need to use that and the relative pronoun touch-rule. Only in C, the relative pronoun which refers correctly to moon.

Daagh, dont you think the sentence is trying to say, that moon was formed from a part of the earth, not from earth. It is like apart of earth say X was hit by a meteor and this action created several heavenly bodies including moon & we can say that the moon had been dislodged.
Please let me understand where I am thinking wrong?
I agree with your logic in C but I want to make sure my understanding is correct.

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Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2017, 14:00
What's the source of this question? Here, OE says that the use of which in A is wrong: the relative pronoun “which” must
refer to the immediately preceding noun, suggesting illogically in this case that “the Earth” was dislodged by a meteor.
I was under impression that the use of which is not so strict and that which can also refer to a group of words. Concretely, I thought that which could correctly refer to 'part of the Earth' in A and that A is wrong for other reasons.
Can which refer to part of the Earth in A? sayantanc2k can you please help?

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2017, 01:32
OE says that the use of which in A is wrong: the relative pronoun ???which??? must
refer to the immediately preceding noun, suggesting illogically in this case that ???the Earth??? was dislodged by a meteor.
I was under impression that the use of which is not so strict and that which can also refer to a group of words. Concretely, I thought that which could correctly refer to 'part of the Earth' in A and that A is wrong for other reasons.
Can which refer to part of the Earth in A?

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2017, 07:41
kivalo wrote:
OE says that the use of which in A is wrong: the relative pronoun ???which??? must
refer to the immediately preceding noun, suggesting illogically in this case that ???the Earth??? was dislodged by a meteor.
I was under impression that the use of which is not so strict and that which can also refer to a group of words. Concretely, I thought that which could correctly refer to 'part of the Earth' in A and that A is wrong for other reasons.
Can which refer to part of the Earth in A?


The use of "which" in A is alright - it refers to "part of the earth". Similarly the use of "that" in B is also alright. These are examples of one particular type of exception of the modifier touch rule - the following excerpt from Manhattan SC guide explains this exception:

In general, noun modifiers must touch their nouns. However, there are a few exceptions to the Touch Rule.
1. A “mission-critical” modifier falls between. This modifier is often an Of phrase that defines the noun. The less important modifier refers to the noun plus the first modifier.
Right: He had a wav OF DODGING OPPONENTS that impressed the scouts.
Here, the “mission-critical” modifier of dodging opponents defines the noun way.

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New post 19 Apr 2017, 21:02
How to apply the mission critical modifier rule?

In this case, 'that' or 'which' can refer to 'part of the earth'. But consider the below MGMAT wrong answer choice:

'The defeat of the Spanish Armada, which stymied the Armada's plans to meet up with the Duke of Parma's army off the coast of Flanders in the Spanish Netherlands, was not only due to gale winds that favored the British but also due to the sacrificing of eight war ships as fireships, vessels filled with pitch, brimstone, gunpowder, and tar and sent downwind toward the closely-anchored Spanish fleet.'

Why does 'which' refer here to 'Spanish Armada' alone and not to 'Defeat of the Spanish Armada'. I am not able to understand under what circumstances must one apply the mission critical modifier rule.

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2017, 02:14
Vyshak wrote:
How to apply the mission critical modifier rule?

In this case, 'that' or 'which' can refer to 'part of the earth'. But consider the below MGMAT wrong answer choice:

'The defeat of the Spanish Armada, which stymied the Armada's plans to meet up with the Duke of Parma's army off the coast of Flanders in the Spanish Netherlands, was not only due to gale winds that favored the British but also due to the sacrificing of eight war ships as fireships, vessels filled with pitch, brimstone, gunpowder, and tar and sent downwind toward the closely-anchored Spanish fleet.'

Why does 'which' refer here to 'Spanish Armada' alone and not to 'Defeat of the Spanish Armada'. I am not able to understand under what circumstances must one apply the mission critical modifier rule.


Hi Vyshak,

Please consider the discussion at this link: https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/forums/stymieing-the-armadaa-s-plans-to-meet-up-with-the-duke-t30250.html

Ron Purewal, in his reply to a question posed by a user on the thread, has indeed said that the use of "which" is fine in such constructions. I agree that the original question on the Manhattan thread is a little different in that it has fewer details in the sentence (for example : your sentence reads Flanders in the Spanish Netherlands, whereas the question there just has Flanders), but the essence of the construction wrt to the use of "which" is the same.

Cheers! :)

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Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2017, 03:04
Vyshak wrote:
How to apply the mission critical modifier rule?

In this case, 'that' or 'which' can refer to 'part of the earth'. But consider the below MGMAT wrong answer choice:

'The defeat of the Spanish Armada, which stymied the Armada's plans to meet up with the Duke of Parma's army off the coast of Flanders in the Spanish Netherlands, was not only due to gale winds that favored the British but also due to the sacrificing of eight war ships as fireships, vessels filled with pitch, brimstone, gunpowder, and tar and sent downwind toward the closely-anchored Spanish fleet.'

Why does 'which' refer here to 'Spanish Armada' alone and not to 'Defeat of the Spanish Armada'. I am not able to understand under what circumstances must one apply the mission critical modifier rule.


In my opinion, "which" is not the reason that this option is wrong - here "which" correctly refers to "The defeat of the Spanish Armada", not "Spanish Armada".

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2017, 08:31
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2017, 18:50
carcass wrote:
well.

First of all let me say that the question for me is good: at the first time it seems easy but indeed you need some brain power to disentagle.

Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps by a meteor.

A) the moon had been formed out of part of the Earth, which was dislodged perhaps

X suggest ---> as soon as you see this, the question is : what ?? what they say. I immediatly think to THAT: we need a restrictive modifier because a priori the meaning of the sentence is: a part of something drifted away from this, going to form another corpus (the moon). That say, we need a resticted modifier to convey the scope of a general noun to a relevant subset. Basically, the other options also communicate that the entire earth took part in this process. And this is wrong: we have ONLY one part comes into the picture.

B) that the moon was formed from part of the Earth that had perhaps been dislodged

here we have the use of THAT correctly used. The sentence is parallel and the events, in their unfolding, are pretty much clear. CORRECT

C) that part of the Earth formed the moon, which was dislodged perhaps

her we have THAT + WHICH: thi is the worst scenario we could have. really far from home

D) the moon was formed out of part of the Earth, having perhaps been dislodged

same as A does + having (remember in general the use of having is really really bad on the gmat)

E) that the moon had been formed from part of the Earth, which perhaps had been dislodged

sama as C

This could comes in handy http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/that-vs-which-on-the-gmat/

Hope this helps



Hi Carcass,

I used the following as decision points :

dislodged perhaps vs perhaps been dislodged

Dislodges perhaps - made more sense to me, as we are not questioning the fact that the moon got dislodged but how it got dislodged "by a meteor"

Vs

Perhaps been dislodged- made me think that we are questioning whether it got dislodged or not

Please suggest, where am I going wrong

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2017, 20:04
The correct answer is C because of the need to use that and past perfect. Only in C, the relative pronoun which refers correctly to moon.

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Re: Some scientists suggest the moon had been formed out of part   [#permalink] 05 Oct 2017, 20:04
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