It is currently 21 Feb 2018, 13:05

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Studying Verbal as a Native Speaker?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 21 Dec 2016
Posts: 12
Location: United Kingdom
Concentration: Strategy
Schools: LBS, Imperial '20, LBS
GMAT 1: 680 Q45 V38
GPA: 3.41
Studying Verbal as a Native Speaker? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jan 2017, 01:22
Hi all,

I often hear that one of the biggest leaks for native GMAT test takers is that they give (relatively) little attention to the verbal section of the GMAT.

My question is, for my for someone in my position, where do I begin with verbal? I've heard very good things about the SC Manhattan Book but is there some sort of guide or study plan for people in similar positions?

Thanks
Sef
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 21 Dec 2016
Posts: 12
Location: United Kingdom
Concentration: Strategy
Schools: LBS, Imperial '20, LBS
GMAT 1: 680 Q45 V38
GPA: 3.41
Re: Studying Verbal as a Native Speaker? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jan 2017, 01:23
Where do I begin studying the Verbal section as a native speaker?
Expert Post
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 1190
Re: Studying Verbal as a Native Speaker? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jan 2017, 00:19
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Often, native speakers rely on their ear to solve Sentence Correction problems. This will get you to a certain point, but you may not be able to make the subtle distinctions necessary to get down to the right answer on a tougher question. My experience is that both native and non-native speakers benefit from working through our Sentence Correction book. After each chapter, you can follow up with targeted problems in the Official Guide. (When you get the book, you also get access to our categorized problem lists.)

I can give more specific advice if I know more about your case, but here are a few tips:

1) Ignore your quant and verbal test percentiles. Just look at your subscores. Both quant and verbal are scored on a 51-point scale, and that's what you should use to compare your strength on the two sections. Unless you are *much* better at quant than at verbal, your quant percentile will be lower, but that's just because people who take the test tend to be stronger in quant. Again, look at your subscores to compare. Unless one score is a whole lot higher (8+ points), you should probably split your time 50/50 between quant and verbal. If one section *is* much stronger, you can shift up to 2:1 in favor of the section that needs more work.

2) Commit to changing how you do things. Don't just accept that "either I can read or I can't." Think about which of your habits are helping or hindering you. Work on strategies to stay more focused during reading. Don't get in the habit of reading things without making sense of them.

3) Practice a little every day, and spend the majority of your time reviewing and redoing problems.

Let me know if I can follow up with details on anything. Good luck!
_________________


Dmitry Farber | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | New York


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 Jan 2017
Posts: 5
Studying Verbal as a Native Speaker? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Feb 2017, 20:22
Hey,
I'm on the same boat. Being a native speaker but still unable to get above V30... It really is disheartening considering I'm not amazingly good at Quant either.
What materials have you been using so far? Are you taking any prep classes? Have you take GMAT before?
I've been doing OG questions and GMAT prep. Also, really good/tough questions on this forum!
I've had people tell me that SC will really boost score, so I focused on that and can get about 80-90% correct and to be honest RC is least I focus on (pretty good at it apart from science passages - don't know what it is, my mind just blanks out!)
Keep practising! Realize your mistakes and don't loose focus on long passages/sentences.
CR can be fun but also tricky with the word play, just need to get used to it
Tip: Try being critical in your day to day life, the next time someone makes a comment or expresses their point, try to see if you can agree to it by adding more facts or think of alternatives to weaken it. What are they assuming? The more you will relate your daily communication with critical reasoning, the better you will get.
Studying Verbal as a Native Speaker?   [#permalink] 09 Feb 2017, 20:22
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Studying Verbal as a Native Speaker?

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.