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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
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Can someone provide an explanation on why A is preferred to D?

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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
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Teja4X4 wrote:
Can someone provide an explanation on why A is preferred to D?

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OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:

Sentence Correction

Wendell Willkie was the Republican nominee for U.S. president in 1940. The underlined portion of this sentence is a subordinate clause stating that when he was nominated, he had not yet changed his voter registration. This clause must be concisely worded to convey this meaning clearly, smoothly, and unambiguously. The phrase at the moment of his nomination must be carefully placed so that it unambiguously modifies the entire phrase indicating that he had not yet changed his voter registration.

A Correct. This wording is clear and concise. The use of that demarcates the beginning of the subordinate clause, clarifying that at the moment of his nomination is part of the clause. The placement of at the moment of his nomination before he had yet to change his voter registration shows that the former phrase modifies the latter.

B This wording confusingly suggests that at the moment of his nomination modifies only change his voter registration rather than the entire phrase he had yet to change his voter registration.

C With no that to mark where the subordinate clause begins, this phrasing confusingly suggests that at the moment of his nomination is part of the main clause and modifies converted to the Republican party. The phrasing there was yet his voter registration to change is awkward and unclear.

D This awkward use of the passive voice is unnecessarily confusing, leaving it unclear who or what had not yet changed Willkie's voter registration. The placement of at the moment of his nomination confusingly suggests that the phrase modifies only changed rather than the entire phrase his voter registration was yet to be changed.

E This awkward combination of the gerund phrase changing his registration with the passive voice is unnecessarily wordy, convoluted, and confusing, leaving it unclear who or what had not yet changed Willkie's voter registration. The use of both changed and done is unnecessarily redundant. The placement of at the moment of his nomination confusingly suggests that the phrase modifies only done rather than the entire phrase changing his voter registration was yet to be done.

The correct answer is A.
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
AjiteshArun egmat could y'all please assist in decoding this sentence? How is the usage of past perfect correct in Option A?

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Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
The difference between A and D is that:
Option A specifies that Democrat was the one who had to change his registration
Option D does not say who is going to change the registration, so it does not give complete meaning
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
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EducationAisle, could you explain the nuances of this sentence and tell why A is correct and the others are wrong?

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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
EducationAisle could you please help decode this and tell why A is correct and others are wrong?

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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the Republican party that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration.

A) that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration
>> Correct. The best choice.

B) he had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination
>> Wrong because of missing of that. so newly and casually converted to the Republican party that; The correct idiom is so...that.

C) at the moment of his nomination there was yet his voter registration to change
>> Same reason as B

D) that his voter registration was yet to be changed at the moment of his nomination
>> The placement of "at the moment of his nomination" changes the intended meaning of sentence

E) that changing his voter registration was yet to be done at the moment of his nomination
>> Same reason as D
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
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Whenever simple past conveys the meaning correctly, it is preferred to past perfect. But that doesn't make use of past perfect incorrect.

In absence of better alternatives, we have to choose option that uses past perfect. Best to keep 'was vs. had' difference as last point of elimination, after you have exhausted other issues.

A is the correct answer here.
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Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
GMATNinja Please explain the difference between Option A & Option D. I am not able to understand the sequence of events in Option A, to justify the usage of "had".
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
A) that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration Correct

=>so..that
=>Per the intended meaning, WW had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination

B) he had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination Incorrect

=>so..that is a correct idiom

C) at the moment of his nomination there was yet his voter registration to change Incorrect

=>so..that is a correct idiom

D) that his voter registration was yet to be changed at the moment of his nomination Incorrect

=> Meaning changed: This sentence fails to express who changed WW's voter registration. Per the intended meaning, WW had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination

E) that changing his voter registration was yet to be done at the moment of his nomination Incorrect

=> Meaning changed: This sentence fails to express who changed WW's voter registration. Per the intended meaning, WW had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination
=> Wordy
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
coreyander wrote:
Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the Republican party that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration.

A) that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration
B) he had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination
C) at the moment of his nomination there was yet his voter registration to change
D) that his voter registration was yet to be changed at the moment of his nomination
E) that changing his voter registration was yet to be done at the moment of his nomination

SC: 16902


Hi,

Can someone explain the role of 'that' in option a. What is it substituting?

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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
srikarkali wrote:
coreyander wrote:
Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the Republican party that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration.

A) that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration
B) he had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination
C) at the moment of his nomination there was yet his voter registration to change
D) that his voter registration was yet to be changed at the moment of his nomination
E) that changing his voter registration was yet to be done at the moment of his nomination

SC: 16902


Hi,

Can someone explain the role of 'that' in option a. What is it substituting?

Srikar


https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... l#p1879038

I believe 'that' is introducing a sub-ordinate clause.
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Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
"to be to do" is a future action. it is a plan.
we want to talk about a fact after "so.... that". we need a fact, not a future plan after the phrase "so... that". so, choice D and E is wrong

Originally posted by thangvietnam on 30 Aug 2020, 00:18.
Last edited by thangvietnam on 14 Aug 2021, 21:04, edited 1 time in total.
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Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
coreyander wrote:
Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the Republican party that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration.

A) that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration
B) he had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination
C) at the moment of his nomination there was yet his voter registration to change
D) that his voter registration was yet to be changed at the moment of his nomination
E) that changing his voter registration was yet to be done at the moment of his nomination

SC: 16902


Two questions.
Firstly, in D is there a tense issue too? I don't think there is a tense issue because his registration was yet to be changed directly tells us that at the moment of his nomination his registration was not changed. two issues which made me eliminate this option were firstly passive construction and secondly there is no doer of the action (was yet to be changed).
Secondly, In A is had really a past perfect, because for it we need a verb too, like had played etc. I think had is simply used as a past tense verb of has. Can you clear this.
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
coreyander wrote:
Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the Republican party that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration.


A) that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration
it's grammatically and tense wise perfect therefore let us hang on to it

B) he had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination
Absence of that makes the sense distorted and akward

C) at the moment of his nomination there was yet his voter registration to change
The absence of that and it would require a comma to accomdate independent clauses

D) that his voter registration was yet to be changed at the moment of his nomination
was yet usage distorts the meaning otherwise it's grammatically correct

E) that changing his voter registration was yet to be done at the moment of his nomination
changing isn't the right usage and the meaning becomes distorted

Therefore IMO A
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
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pk6969 wrote:
coreyander wrote:
Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the Republican party that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration.

A) that at the moment of his nomination he had yet to change his voter registration
B) he had yet to change his voter registration at the moment of his nomination
C) at the moment of his nomination there was yet his voter registration to change
D) that his voter registration was yet to be changed at the moment of his nomination
E) that changing his voter registration was yet to be done at the moment of his nomination

SC: 16902


Two questions.
Firstly, in D is there a tense issue too? I don't think there is a tense issue because his registration was yet to be changed directly tells us that at the moment of his nomination his registration was not changed. two issues which made me eliminate this option were firstly passive construction and secondly there is no doer of the action (was yet to be changed).
Secondly, In A is had really a past perfect, because for it we need a verb too, like had played etc. I think had is simply used as a past tense verb of has. Can you clear this.
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
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Hello SURAVI1995,

Thank you for sending the PM on this question. :-)

You asked:

Quote:
Hi,
I have taken the verbal and quants course with you. I have a doubt in this question. I don't understand why we need to use "had".
Please help me with the same.



You are confused about this question because you think that "had" in the underlined portion of the sentence is a past perfect tense verb, the usage of which should be incorrect in the sentence. This is certainly not the case.

The verbs have, has, and had work as the past perfect tense ONLY when these words are followed by another verb in its past participle form. For example, had said, had eaten, etc. But that is NOT the case in this official sentence. The word "had" is followed by "to change", which is not a verb. So, when have, has, and had are used just by themselves, they act as simple tense verbs. So, in this sentence, "had" is the simple past tense verb.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Wendell Willkie was a Democrat so newly and casually converted to the [#permalink]
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