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"WHICH" Tragedy

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 01:02
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 151

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"WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 01:02
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 151

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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 01:03
Need help on WHICH Usage

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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 01:35
rocko911 wrote:
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u


You should post the whole question with the underlined part. Whole question is:
Quote:
Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading

LINK: https://gmatclub.com/forum/given-its-au ... 83553.html

The OA for this question is E. In A, "which" cannot refer to "the textbook's chapter on genetics". A is the incorrect answer choice.
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"WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 02:11
broall wrote:
rocko911 wrote:
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u


You should post the whole question with the underlined part. Whole question is:
Quote:
Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading

LINK: https://gmatclub.com/forum/given-its-au ... 83553.html

The OA for this question is E. In A, "which" cannot refer to "the textbook's chapter on genetics". A is the incorrect answer choice.



Well A is referring to "The textbook's chapter on genetics"

READ THE BOLD PART

here is the solution


The original sentence contains several errors. First, the opening modifier "given its authoritative coverage of other science topics" describes the textbook as a whole, yet the subject of the main clause is "the textbook's chapter on genetics." Second, the relative pronoun"which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only; it cannot modify the action of an entire clause, as it does here.

(A) This choice is incorrect as it repeats the original sentence.

(B) The modifier issue is not corrected here, since "the chapter" remains the subject of the main clause (as opposed to "the textbook"). However, this choice does correct the misuse of "which" by replacing it with "leading."

(C) The modifier issue is corrected here by making "the textbook" the subject of the main clause. However, the misuse of "which" is retained. The relative pronoun "which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only; it cannot modify the action of an entire clause, as it does here. Also, the phrase "surprising and tentative" implies that the chapter on genetics is both "surprising" and "tentative," two characteristics that are independent of one another. However, it is clear in the original sentence that "surprisingly" is meant to be an adverb that modifies the adjective "tentative." The chapter is "suprisingly tentative," not "suprising and tentative."

(D) The modifier issue is not corrected here, since "the textbook's chapter" is the subject of the main clause (as opposed to "the textbook"). Moreover, the verb "leads" is incorrectly parallel with "is" when it should be subordinate (e.g., "leading"). This makes it less clear that doubting the author's scholarship is a result of the tentativeness of the chapter on genetics.

(E) CORRECT. The modifier issue is corrected here by making "the textbook" the subject of the main clause. Moreover, "which" is replaced by "leading," thus eliminating the incorrect use of "which" while preserving the meaning of the sentence.

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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 03:42
How did you infer that which is modifying chapter?

Is A the right answer?
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New post 15 Sep 2017, 03:55
EducationAisle wrote:
How did you infer that which is modifying chapter?

Is A the right answer?


No but this is the reasoning given in solution of this question for REJECTING A

The original sentence contains several errors. First, the opening modifier "given its authoritative coverage of other science topics" describes the textbook as a whole, yet the subject of the main clause is "the textbook's chapter on genetics." Second, the relative pronoun "which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only; it cannot modify the action of an entire clause, as it does here.

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"WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 04:05
rocko911 wrote:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
broall wrote:
rocko911 wrote:
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u


You should post the whole question with the underlined part. Whole question is:
Quote:
Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading

LINK: https://gmatclub.com/forum/given-its-au ... 83553.html

The OA for this question is E. In A, "which" cannot refer to "the textbook's chapter on genetics". A is the incorrect answer choice.


Well A is referring to "The textbook's chapter on genetics"

READ THE BOLD PART

here is the solution


The original sentence contains several errors. First, the opening modifier "given its authoritative coverage of other science topics" describes the textbook as a whole, yet the subject of the main clause is "the textbook's chapter on genetics." Second, the relative pronoun"which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only; it cannot modify the action of an entire clause, as it does here.

(A) This choice is incorrect as it repeats the original sentence.

(B) The modifier issue is not corrected here, since "the chapter" remains the subject of the main clause (as opposed to "the textbook"). However, this choice does correct the misuse of "which" by replacing it with "leading."

(C) The modifier issue is corrected here by making "the textbook" the subject of the main clause. However, the misuse of "which" is retained. The relative pronoun "which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only; it cannot modify the action of an entire clause, as it does here. Also, the phrase "surprising and tentative" implies that the chapter on genetics is both "surprising" and "tentative," two characteristics that are independent of one another. However, it is clear in the original sentence that "surprisingly" is meant to be an adverb that modifies the adjective "tentative." The chapter is "suprisingly tentative," not "suprising and tentative."

(D) The modifier issue is not corrected here, since "the textbook's chapter" is the subject of the main clause (as opposed to "the textbook"). Moreover, the verb "leads" is incorrectly parallel with "is" when it should be subordinate (e.g., "leading"). This makes it less clear that doubting the author's scholarship is a result of the tentativeness of the chapter on genetics.

(E) CORRECT. The modifier issue is corrected here by making "the textbook" the subject of the main clause. Moreover, "which" is replaced by "leading," thus eliminating the incorrect use of "which" while preserving the meaning of the sentence.


The explanation states clearly that "which" cannot modify the entire clause. How do you come to the question that "which" here refer to "the textbook's chapter on genetics"?
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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 04:08
I don't see where the explanation says that which is modifying chapter. The original sentence is like this:

John is very disciplined, which is good for his academics.

This is incorrect because which is trying to modify the clause John is very disciplined (because the fact that John is very disciplined, is good for his academics) .

which, a relative pronoun, can only modify nouns, not clauses (because clauses have verbs and pronouns cannot modify verbs).

We have a similar case in the sentence under consideration.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses these issues of "which", their application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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New post 15 Sep 2017, 04:09
rocko911 wrote:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
broall wrote:
rocko911 wrote:
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u


You should post the whole question with the underlined part. Whole question is:
Quote:
Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading

LINK: https://gmatclub.com/forum/given-its-au ... 83553.html

The OA for this question is E. In A, "which" cannot refer to "the textbook's chapter on genetics". A is the incorrect answer choice.


Well A is referring to "The textbook's chapter on genetics"

READ THE BOLD PART

here is the solution


The original sentence contains several errors. First, the opening modifier "given its authoritative coverage of other science topics" describes the textbook as a whole, yet the subject of the main clause is "the textbook's chapter on genetics." Second, the relative pronoun"which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only; it cannot modify the action of an entire clause, as it does here.

(A) This choice is incorrect as it repeats the original sentence.

(B) The modifier issue is not corrected here, since "the chapter" remains the subject of the main clause (as opposed to "the textbook"). However, this choice does correct the misuse of "which" by replacing it with "leading."

(C) The modifier issue is corrected here by making "the textbook" the subject of the main clause. However, the misuse of "which" is retained. The relative pronoun "which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only; it cannot modify the action of an entire clause, as it does here. Also, the phrase "surprising and tentative" implies that the chapter on genetics is both "surprising" and "tentative," two characteristics that are independent of one another. However, it is clear in the original sentence that "surprisingly" is meant to be an adverb that modifies the adjective "tentative." The chapter is "suprisingly tentative," not "suprising and tentative."

(D) The modifier issue is not corrected here, since "the textbook's chapter" is the subject of the main clause (as opposed to "the textbook"). Moreover, the verb "leads" is incorrectly parallel with "is" when it should be subordinate (e.g., "leading"). This makes it less clear that doubting the author's scholarship is a result of the tentativeness of the chapter on genetics.

(E) CORRECT. The modifier issue is corrected here by making "the textbook" the subject of the main clause. Moreover, "which" is replaced by "leading," thus eliminating the incorrect use of "which" while preserving the meaning of the sentence.


The explanation states clearly that "which" cannot modify the entire clause. How do you come to the question that "which" here refer to "the textbook's chapter on genetics"?[/quote]








Because ITS CLEARLY STATED THAT "WHICH" is used here to modify the clause....THAT IS MY QUESTION!!!!!!

HOW WILL I KNOW IF ITS Modifying a Clause or a noun....I am not asking about right or wrong answer!
"which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only;

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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 04:18
rocko911 wrote:
Because ITS CLEARLY STATED THAT "WHICH" is used here to modify the clause....THAT IS MY QUESTION!!!!!!

HOW WILL I KNOW IF ITS Modifying a Clause or a noun....I am not asking about right or wrong answer!
"which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only;


How could you know? Based on the MEANING of the question. If you read the question well and understand the meaning, you could easily eliminate the wrong answer choice without asking why "which" modifies that part.
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"WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 04:31
rocko911 wrote:
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u



Coming to your ",which" doubt directly.

First thing, it is not always necessary that which will modify the immediately preceding noun. This is not a rule according to gmat. If you read it somewhere, unlearn it!

Second, to work a way around for which problems remember the thumb rule " there should be no verb between which and its antecedent "

e.g.- the captain held on to his glass despite the rocky waves, which was full of whiskey!

Here which clearly refers to the glass and not to the waves!


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New post 15 Sep 2017, 07:33
broall wrote:
rocko911 wrote:
Because ITS CLEARLY STATED THAT "WHICH" is used here to modify the clause....THAT IS MY QUESTION!!!!!!

HOW WILL I KNOW IF ITS Modifying a Clause or a noun....I am not asking about right or wrong answer!
"which" is used here to modify the entire clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." "Which" must modify the immediately preceding noun only;


How could you know? Based on the MEANING of the question. If you read the question well and understand the meaning, you could easily eliminate the wrong answer choice without asking why "which" modifies that part.



Man, I really appreciate ur response but you are not getting what I am asking

I AM NOT ASKING WHY OPTION A IS WRONG

I am asking

WHY IS "WHICH" in option A referring to the clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative."

That is it......I just want to know the reason of this.

Because in OE its given that "WHICH" in option A is modifying the clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative." and Not the TENTATIVE ALONE


DO you get my point?

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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 07:34
craveyourave wrote:
rocko911 wrote:
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics


Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u



Coming to your ",which" doubt directly.

First thing, it is not always necessary that which will modify the immediately preceding noun. This is not a rule according to gmat. If you read it somewhere, unlearn it!

Second, to work a way around for which problems remember the thumb rule " there should be no verb between which and its antecedent "

e.g.- the captain held on to his glass despite the rocky waves, which was full of whiskey!

Here which clearly refers to the glass and not to the waves!


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum mobile app


Thanks
but can u provide couple of more examples and EXPLAIN ME How are u exactly doing it?

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"WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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rocko911 wrote:
craveyourave wrote:
rocko911 wrote:
I learnt and used WHICH as ( , which) and using this means "which" is modifying the noun just before it

But in this example

Given its authoritative coverage of other science topics, the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads one to doubt the author's scholarship in that particular area.

A) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative, which leads
B) the chapter of the textbook on genetics is surprisingly tentative, leading
C) the textbook contains a surprising and tentative chapter on genetics, which leads
D) the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative and leads
E) the textbook is surprisingly tentative in its chapter on genetics, leading


WHY IS which modifying = the textbook's chapter on genetics

Please someone explain me how to differentiate between them and Please explain in simple and easy words

Thank u



Coming to your ",which" doubt directly.

First thing, it is not always necessary that which will modify the immediately preceding noun. This is not a rule according to gmat. If you read it somewhere, unlearn it!

Second, to work a way around for which problems remember the thumb rule " there should be no verb between which and its antecedent "

e.g.- the captain held on to his glass despite the rocky waves, which was full of whiskey!

Here which clearly refers to the glass and not to the waves!


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum mobile app


Thanks
but can u provide couple of more examples and EXPLAIN ME How are u exactly doing it?



Sure, another example:

The High Court‘s rulings in the cases involving assisted suicides among college-going teens from single-parent families, which were overturned by the Supreme Court last month, have been re-instituted by a special interventionist order by the President.

Here "which" is referring back to "rulings". Notice that in the sentence there is no verb between ruling and which.



As for the doubt in SC question or particularly "WHY IS "WHICH" in option A referring to the clause "the textbook's chapter on genetics is surprisingly tentative". This has got to do with the meaning of the sentence.

Imagine two sentences:

A- The sun was shining brightly on the beach, causing people to roam topless.
B- The sun was shining brightly on the beach, which caused people to roam topless.

Sentence A here is correct since "causing people to roam topless" is a result of "The sun was shining brightly on the beach"

Sentence B is wrong because even if "which" referred to the immediately preceding noun (beach), it is not the beach that caused people to roam shirtless, it was "The sun was shining brightly on the beach" that caused it. And if you believe what I just said then in that case "which" here is trying to refer back to the entire preceding clause. But this would be wrong since by nature which is a pronoun and pronoun should refer back only to nouns.

Hope this helps!


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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2017, 17:39
In almost all cases, "which" modifies a noun that's immediately to its left.

When you see "which" in a sentence, look at the noun to its immediate left.

If there is no noun to the left, the sentence is probably wrong.

If there is a noun there, ask yourself: does it make logical sense for the "which" phrase to modify that noun? If not, the sentence is probably wrong.

If so, everything is okay so far; look for other issues.
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Re: "WHICH" Tragedy   [#permalink] 19 Sep 2017, 17:39
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