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While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2015, 08:13
daagh wrote:
Staybish:
Are you implying that this question itself isn't gmattish, since none of the choices has the 'than' element?
Hi, Come on, look for the best among the lot.


Hi daagh!

I know that none of the option differ in the use of 'much larger' here; I jus wanted to address my concern.

Thanks!

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2015, 08:17
Staybish
I understand; you are welcome
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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2015, 09:00
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sytabish wrote:
Hi daagh,

There is no 'than' for 'much larger' here. My concern is whether we can skip the 'than' when we are using comparison signal 'much larger' or 'much smaller' . Is it allowed on GMAT?
Please help me with clarification.

Thanks!


Hi,
it is fine..
if you look at the statement, it is not comparing it with some thing else...
it says that the bird looks much larger than what it is actually....
example ..
the model of the car looks much smarter from sides...
it is compaaring with itself and this is what is being said about this bird..
it appears bigger when it opens its wing..
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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2016, 00:07
Hi Experts / chetan2u / VeritasPrepKarishma ,

I opted for D because this option tries to maintain the original meaning "Birds look similar when SITTING on branch" .But if I talk about option E, in this option "Birds look similar when they are on a branch".

So, option E slightly changes the meaning. Therefore I opted option D.

Can you please provide strong reason to eliminate D.

Please assist,
Thanks and Regards,
Prakhar
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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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PrakharGMAT wrote:
Hi Experts / chetan2u / VeritasPrepKarishma ,

I opted for D because this option tries to maintain the original meaning "Birds look similar when SITTING on branch" .But if I talk about option E, in this option "Birds look similar when they are on a branch".

So, option E slightly changes the meaning. Therefore I opted option D.

Can you please provide strong reason to eliminate D.

Please assist,
Thanks and Regards,
Prakhar



hi PrakharGMAT,

lets look at D..

appear equal in size to each other when they are sitting on a branch or in a nest, in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger because of its greater wingspan

'each other' is redundant and also changes the meaning slightly..
It seems that they look equal to each other.. that is when they are sitting on branch, EACH sees the OTHER equal to itself..
Ofcourse thats illogical, it appears to others, so EACH other should be removed..
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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2016, 20:15
fozzzy wrote:
While the Eastern Whip-poor-will -–a nocturnal bird that feeds mostly in the very early morning–- and the Common Nighthawk –-a nocturnal bird from the same family that, despite its name, feeds mostly during the morning and evening–- appear equal in size to each other when sitting on a branch or in a nest, in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger due to its greater wingspan.

1 appear equal in size to each other when sitting on a branch or in a nest, in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger due to its greater wingspan.
2 appear equal in size to one another when sitting on a branch or in a nest, in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger due to its greater wingspan.
3 appear equal in size when sitting on a branch or in a nest; in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger because of its greater wingspan.
4 appear equal in size to each other when they are sitting on a branch or in a nest, in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger because of its greater wingspan
5 appear equal in size when they are seen on a branch or in a nest, in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger because of its greater wingspan.

Please explain! Thanks


structural errors are no problem to us because they are rules.
meaning errors are a problem to us. in analysing meaning errors we focus on
- illogic meaning
- unclear meaning
- not close meaning
- redundant meaning

if we can eliminate those kinds of meaning errors, our writen sentence become clear and concise and this is what gmat want from us.

comming back to this problem.

we see redundant meaning in "equal in each other", eliminate A,B,D.
structural errors in choice c is grammar rule , too easy.
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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2016, 22:35
PrakharGMAT wrote:
Hi Experts / chetan2u / VeritasPrepKarishma ,

I opted for D because this option tries to maintain the original meaning "Birds look similar when SITTING on branch" .But if I talk about option E, in this option "Birds look similar when they are on a branch".

So, option E slightly changes the meaning. Therefore I opted option D.

Can you please provide strong reason to eliminate D.

Please assist,
Thanks and Regards,
Prakhar


Here is the thing about original meaning - it doesn't exist. Note that option (A) is in no way superior to other 4 options. The probability of option (A) being correct is 20% only. The distinction is not "original meaning" vs "altered meaning"; it is "logical" vs "illogical" meaning.

In option (A) and (D), "...equal in size to each other..." is somewhat illogical. For an onlooker, two things could be equal in size. They are not equal in size to each other.
On the other hand, you can say that when they stood side by side, they found that they were equal in height to each other... etc.

So you need to find the logically correct sentence. Option (E) is more appropriate because they appear equal in size to the onlookers.
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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2016, 22:58
Hi,

Can someone please elaborate how C was eliminated ? I've read the Explainations given above,
but I still don't understand how in C the 1st part is incomplete or the 2 clauses aren't independent.

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2016, 04:28
anuj11 wrote:
Hi,

Can someone please elaborate how C was eliminated ? I've read the Explainations given above,
but I still don't understand how in C the 1st part is incomplete or the 2 clauses aren't independent.


First part (removing the modifiers):
While the Eastern Whip-poor-will -–a nocturnal bird that feeds mostly in the very early morning–- and the Common Nighthawk –-a nocturnal bird from the same family that, despite its name, feeds mostly during the morning and evening–- appear equal in size when sitting on a branch or in a nest;

The structure is: While X and Y appear equal in size; .... there is no independent clause before the semicolon. ( A semicolon must separate two independent clauses.)

[The only independent clause of the sentence comes AFTER the semicolon:
in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger because of its greater wingspan.]

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2017, 22:50
kindly explain why option 3 is incorrect

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2017, 04:52
smita17.sp@gmail.com wrote:
kindly explain why option 3 is incorrect



While the Eastern Whip-poor-will -–a nocturnal bird that feeds mostly in the very early morning–- and the Common Nighthawk –-a nocturnal bird from the same family that, despite its name, feeds mostly during the morning and evening–- appear equal in size when sitting on a branch or in a nest; in the air, the Common Nighthawk appears much larger because of its greater wingspan.

Note the structure of the sentence:

While E and C appear equal in size when sitting on a branch; C appears much larger ...

So what we have here is a subordinate clause (starting with "While") and an independent clause. You cannot combine the two with a semi colon.
To use a semi colon, you must have two independent clauses.
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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2017, 10:45
Hello expert,

I understand that option 'e' is correct, but as this options has the usage of 'each other' and 'one another' , could you please explain the difference between "appear equal to one another" and "appear equal to each other" in context of this question.

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2017, 10:55
VKat wrote:
Hello expert,

I understand that option 'e' is correct, but as this options has the usage of 'each other' and 'one another' , could you please explain the difference between "appear equal to one another" and "appear equal to each other" in context of this question.


"Each other" and "one another" are interchangeable, though on this context they do not make sense. The phrase implies that bird A appears equal to bird B, and bird B appears equal to bird A.

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2017, 17:59
dave785 wrote:
It's a meaning question.

Do the birds look at each other, and think they're the same size? no... that rules out ABC and D.


I doubt anyone reading the passage would think the birds are comparing their size to the other bird. This would imply the reader is personifying the birds which readers are very very very very unlikely to do. Kind of a stupid question for that reason. The passage gives us no indicating that the birds are being personified. I don't think there is very much between, D & E. C has a pretty tricky semicolon which Karishma pointed out above has no independent clause.

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2017, 22:54
Great question.

Option A,B and D can easily be eliminated. (appear equal in size to each other is redundant).

We are left with C and E.

C makes the mistake of using a semi colon, while the first half of the sentence is clearly dependent on this clause.

Slash and burn - while they appear equal in size on branch and in nest, in air they appear unequal.

This leaves us with the correct option E.

Hope my reasoning was satisfying!

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Re: While the Eastern Whip-poor-will a nocturnal bird that feeds   [#permalink] 05 Aug 2017, 22:54

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