Posts Tagged ‘writing techniques’

Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays

By - Dec 10, 06:00 AM   Comments [0]

What does the adcom actually want to know about the challenges you’ve overcome? In this short video, Linda Abraham shares the answer to this often-asked question: Why obstacles? When applicants write about their accomplishments, whether in personal statements for graduate school or in b-school essays that ask for greatest accomplishments,...

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Writing a Powerful Leadership/Achievement Essay

By - Oct 31, 06:00 AM   Comments [0]

Essays that ask you to write about significant achievements fall under the category of behavioral or experiential questions. The basic assumption behind these questions is that past behavior is a great predictor of future behavior and are used to measure of your managerial potential. Introducing the MBA uber-value: leadership Achievement questions present fantastic...

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How Personal is Too Personal?

By - Oct 18, 06:30 AM   Comments [0]

The personal statement serves as a terrific opportunity to share with admissions committees an interesting and unique aspect of your life. How much should you tell, and how much is too much? When I applied to college, I wrote a personal statement describing some challenging family...

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How to Use Powerful Details to Create Strong Essays

By - Oct 17, 06:00 AM   Comments [0]

To really draw your readers into your goal-focused essay, you’re going to want to lay the scene for your future accomplishments. After all, what better way to convince the adcom of your ambitions than to illustrate them in your essay? First, identify your goal. When you begin...

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Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF!

By - Sep 29, 06:30 AM   Comments [0]

One of the things admissions committee members tell us again and again is that they wish – really, truly wish – that applicants would not try to write what they imagine the adcom wants to hear, and instead would just be themselves. Admissions committee members...

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Generic-itis Prevention [Warning: If Untreated, Can Cause Rejection]

By - Sep 25, 06:00 AM   Comments [0]

Each year, Accepted consultants are witnessing a recurring epidemic. And it’s worse than you can imagine: Generic-itis. What generic-itis looks like Here is an example of a severe case of generic-–itis that I drafted based on several different examples I recently read, along with 25 years of...

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Two Grad School Applicants Walk Into a Bar…

By - Sep 22, 06:00 AM   Comments [0]

This might be a great opening line for a comedy night at a university student center, but can you use humor in a graduate school application essay? Should you even try? The answer is…maybe. If you have a funny bone, use it If you can use humor effectively,...

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How to Stay Within Essay Word Limits by Reducing Verbal Verbosity

By - Aug 16, 06:00 AM   Comments [0]

Most applicants – whether applying to med school, law school, business school, or any other grad school or college program – need to deal with rigid character or word limits when writing their application essays or personal statements. You may start out thinking that you have...

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The Miraculous 15-Minute ROUGH, ROUGH Draft

By - Jul 16, 06:00 AM   Comments [0]

Having trouble getting those first few words and sentences of your application essay up on your computer screen? Don’t fret – even the most accomplished novelists or famous journalists have a tough time getting started. Tempted to get up and do something – anything! – rather than...

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How to Project Professionalism & Positivity in Your Statement of Purpose

By - Nov 15, 06:30 AM   Comments [0]

In my previous post, I discussed the importance of maintaining an appropriate tone in your admissions essay, and provided tips for checking your tone, specifically for finding a confident tone and avoiding arrogance. Once again, “tone” refers to a writer’s attitude toward their subject (and their...

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