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Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer

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Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2016, 03:08
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Question Stats:

30% (01:36) correct 70% (02:08) wrong based on 330 sessions

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Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer religious people today than fifty years ago. There are two primary critiques of that view, however. First, the conclusion depends on a definition that is highly subject to debate. If “religion” is defined as a strongly held conviction about the purpose of the world, for instance, the academics may be incorrect. On the other hand, the conclusion would be justified if "religion" is defined as a belief in a supernatural god. Second, the academics base their conclusion almost exclusively on data collected from the western hemisphere.

Which of the following, if assumed, strengthens the conclusion of the academics?

A) The definition of "religion" was as highly subject to debate fifty years ago as it is today

B) The conclusion applied only to the western hemisphere

C) Academics often draw conclusions based on evidence based almost exclusively on data from the western hemisphere

D) Most people believe "religion" should be defined as a belief in a supernatural god

E) Fewer people believe in a supernatural god today than fifty years ago

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Don't understand how B is the answer. I thought B weakens.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2016, 22:50
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The argument says Second, the academics base their conclusion almost exclusively on data collected from the western hemisphere.

If we get support that this study is only based for western hemisphere and not for the whole globe, then the argument is surely strengthened.
Data is collected from the western hemisphere and if the conclusion drawn is for the whole globe, then surely the conclusion is wrong. If the conclusion is for the western hemisphere only, then the conclusion stands strong.

Hope it is clear now. :)
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Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2016, 19:34
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Um... I'm kind of lost as well. What's the source?

I mean, the preface is "Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer religious people today than fifty years ago" in specifically broad terms.
The OA is basically admitting that "there may not be fewer religious people overall IF we add the Eastern continent to the mix". Isn't this potentially the exact opposite of the conclusion = there are fewer religious people [in general]?

I think it should be something like:

[ Academics in theology departments generally agree that in some parts of the world there are fewer religious people today than fifty years ago. There are two primary critiques of that view, however. First, the conclusion depends on a definition that is highly subject to debate. If “religion” is defined as a strongly held conviction about the purpose of the world, for instance, the academics may be incorrect. On the other hand, the conclusion would be justified if "religion" is defined as a belief in a supernatural god. Second, the academics base their conclusion almost exclusively on data collected from the western hemisphere. ]

Just my two cents. :)
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Re: Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2017, 03:33
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hi,

how come option B ?

If we assume that , data is from western hemisphere then we are supporting critique. Our job is to support Acamedics and not the critique of Acamedics..

Please suggest if my reasoning is incorrect.

Regards,
Pratik

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Re: Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2017, 07:55
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first of all, test takers should read the question stem because the question wants a strengthener for the conclusion of the academic. In other words, the right answer should support the conclusion that there are fewer religions today than 50 years ago.

boiled to to B and D.
D is incorrect because how or what most of people define "religion" has nothing to do with the definition set up by the academics.

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Re: Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 00:09
What about the first part of the premise? Even if the conclusion is based entirely on Western Hemisphere, it still leaves the definition of religion unaddressed, no?

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Re: Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer [#permalink]

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New post 14 Dec 2017, 03:06
I do not understand, why this question is one of 150 hardest questions?
The source of this question is not clear, and this question looks weird.

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Re: Academics in theology departments generally agree that there are fewer   [#permalink] 14 Dec 2017, 03:06
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