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Calling all Kelley (Indiana) Applicants: (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!!

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Location: India
Concentration: Technology, Strategy
GMAT 1: 760 Q51 V41
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Perfect Your On-The-Job Elevator Pitch [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2016, 13:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Perfect Your On-The-Job Elevator Pitch
By  Kendell Brown, Associate Director of Alumni Career Services 

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Kendell Brown
By now you are likely familiar with the idea of an elevator pitch. It’s a concise summary of an individual’s brand. I like to think of it as a 30-second commercial highlighting someone’s strengths and leverage-able skills. We talk about elevator pitches all of the time in job search circles. It can be used as an intro at a coffee chat, it’s the foundation for an answer to the “Tell me about yourself” question and if you happen to see a hiring manager on an elevator, well you figure it out.  Bottom line, they are useful and you can use them throughout your job search.

The thing is, once people find a new job, they typically abandon their elevator pitch. The thinking is, “I’ve got a job, why do I still need an elevator pitch?” If you take a more expansive view of an elevator pitch and define it as not just a tool to help me get a job, but instead as a professional executive summary you’ll see that you can use an elevator pitch in a variety of settings.

Entrepreneurs and salespeople often have a pitch ready to go, because they recognize that they cannot let an opportunity pass that could lead to an investment or sale.

But what about you, the cubicle jockey who’s just trying to get ahead—do you need an elevator pitch? Yes! Just because you have a job, doesn’t mean that you are not still trying to sell yourself. Let’s say that you are working on a big project, it’s your No. 1 priority and you feel as if you are really rocking it. Sure your manager and everyone on your team knows how well things are going and they recognize that you’re the reason. But what about your manager’s manager? Or the VP that your director reports to?

Those higher ups, are probably familiar with the project and that it’s moving along—they’ve devoted personnel resources to it, so there’s going to be a level of interest. But they likely don’t know that you are driving the project’s success. And why should they?  s long as the project is moving along and what needs to get done is getting done, they don’t really care about who’s leading the project. Or do they?

While it’s true that you may not be a high priority to them, but those senior leaders are vested in the long-term success of the company. They want to know who’s got what it takes to be a star. So how do you let everyone know that the project is progressing, the creative problem-solving you are doing and how you are motivating the team? Use an on-the-job elevator pitch. Instead of the pitch focusing on you and what you would bring to a position, this pitch will instead be a commercial highlighting you and what you’re doing at work.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Leaving Hollywood and Its Tyrannical Leaders Behind [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2016, 10:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Leaving Hollywood and Its Tyrannical Leaders Behind
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by Kyle Hebenstreit, MBA'16

The ability to write in a way that inspires and fosters teamwork is a trait of great leadership. Students in the Kelley MBA Leadership Academy, in collaboration with the Gotham Writers Workshop, have produced a series of blog posts to demonstrate these skills.

Hollywood is a weird place to work. Maybe it’s fictional characters like Ari Gold, Buddy Ackerman or Les Grossman that glorify the notion of an office tyrant, but there’s a celebrated culture of intensely demanding and, frankly, disrespectful bosses. Schadenfreude-fueled tales of misconduct drifted through the halls of talent agencies and studios where I worked.

There’s the time the agent publicly went ballistic on his assistant for not turning all of the Perrier bottles East, as requested. Or the time an executive didn’t like his assistant’s tie, so he took a pair of scissors and cut it in half to make what I’m sure was an important point. Or the time the head of the agency stood on his assistant’s desk, golf club in hand, screaming, “I don’t pay you to think!”

An explanation for why people act this way is for another blog, or cultural anthropology dissertation. What I’m trying to illustrate is that this is where I started my education on what it means to be a manager, a coach, a leader.

As much as I loved the bulk of my time in Hollywood, I’ll admit I had an internal struggle identifying what I could and should expect from my bosses. I believed that I should be empowered to produce—not coerced. I thought I should receive constructive feedback—not backhanded comments. But was I yearning to be coddled? Was I one of those whiny, self-involved millennials that I’ve read so much about? God, I hope not. Those people seem like THE WORST.

Oh, so THIS is leadership

Call me a hopeless idealist, but I always maintained a kernel of hope that there was some shining city upon a hill, where managers took responsibility for the development of their employees. What a place that must be, maybe they even had fast food restaurants that served breakfast all day.

Of course no such place exists. Most fast food restaurants stop serving breakfast at 11 a.m. But, through attending the Kelley Full-time MBA Program, I learned that there are places that invest in employee development.

During the summer after my first year of business school, I worked as a corporate strategy intern at Cummins, Inc. I was placed on a small team led by a director. At the beginning of my internship, the director held a meeting to set expectations. It was … odd. We discussed our personality types. We shared information about work habits and preferences. The director shared a PowerPoint slide in which he’d written expectations for team members, as well as expectations we could have of him. We stopped short of a drum circle. It all felt very soft.

And so was the beginning of what I’d describe as my reintegration program. Throughout the summer, the director routinely checked in on my personal development. I knew that he was in the midst of an exciting and challenging personal transition within the company, yet he took the time to actively manage my growth. At the end of the summer, I reflected on my experience and realized his efforts were far from “odd” or “soft”—they made sense and they were important.

Re-entering my second year at Kelley, I chose to join the Leadership Academy. Through lectures, readings, self-reflection and experiential learning opportunities, I learned that the pillars of the Academy aligned with my experience at Cummins.

Good leaders practice
Over the past several months, I’ve actively worked to deepen and define my personal philosophy on what it means to be an effective leader. I choose to juxtapose part of my Hollywood experience and my MBA experience to illuminate pieces of this philosophy.

It’s not the degradation or unprofessional theatrics that make the Ari Gold’s of the world bad leaders. Sure it’s a little twisted, but the real problem is an assumed one-way relationship that breeds a culture of exclusively managing up. Not only does this severely limit the potential value of junior employees who aren’t properly managed, but it limits the impact of managers who don’t practice managing down, because, as Jeff Bewkes nicely puts it, “The one skill that they’ve practiced is useless once they get where they want to go.”

Great leaders shoulder crushing demands from above and make time to practice leadership as a skill. They don’t rely on some magical, innate ability. My director at Cummins wasn’t a “born leader.” He wasn’t some well of one-liners that brought order to a chaotic world. He simply had the interest and discipline to be present and listen, which went a long way in empowering me to perform.

It’s all so obvious now but I needed to experience the obvious to truly learn it.  I leave Kelley armed with a clearer understanding of great leadership. But, just in case, I’ll keep my scissors and nine-iron close by.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Bloomington Audit: Daniel Castelline, MBA'17 [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2016, 12:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Bloomington Audit: Daniel Castelline, MBA'17
Daniel Castelline, MBA’17, continues our #BtownAudit series and shares some of his favorite things about Bloomington, Indiana.

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Daniel Castelline, MBA'17, and his favorite things.

When I first relocated to Bloomington from Boston, “apprehensive” would have been an appropriate expression of my uncertainty. Southern Indiana doesn’t exactly jump off the map, but the prospect of attending the Kelley Full-Time MBA Program was too alluring to pass up. So I packed my bags, and off to the land of corn I went.

Bloomington has been an ideal place to pursue my MBA. I often refer to the town as a “student’s utopia.” A town that punches above its weight, Bloomington is affordable, convenient, friendly and, oh yeah, did I mention affordable? Because of its intimate size, Bloomington also fosters an environment of community, culture and collaboration; and you’re bound to run into classmates wherever you go.

Here’s a short list of my favorite city slicker things to do in Bloomington:

Andrew Davis
Whenever in need of a little retail-therapy, Andrew Davis is the place of choice for high-end menswear. A premier boutique in Bloomington, Andrew Davis carries an assortment of top-line labels. Drop by to have a beer, peruse their latest collection, and chat with storeowner Andy Mallor, a Kelley alumnus and IU enthusiast.

The Tap
A favorite among the Kelley MBA community, The Tap is a wonderful place to unwind with both classmates and faculty. With more than 300 craft beers, The Tap’s variety is terrific for those with an adventurous pallet. Looking for a recommendation? Start with the Kentucky Bourbon—on tap, of course!

Bluebird, a historic music venue, for karaoke, Boy Band Night, and to see a number of high-profile musicians. Past and upcoming performers include David Nail, Third Eye Blind and the Eli Young Band.

Bloomington Farmers Market
A popular activity for anyone possessing a Bloomington zip code, the Farmers Market is an excellent way to support the local community and economy. Meet and mingle with organic farmers, listen to the live bluegrass music, and take home an ear or two of Indiana’s famous sweet corn.

The Comedy Attic
Who doesn’t like to laugh? Good thing the Comedy Attic has got you covered. With acts such as Tim Meadows (The Ladies Man), Isaac Witty (Bob & Tom Show) and Brian Posehn (The Sarah Silverman Program), you’re sure to be splitting at the sides.

Big Ten Athletics
For the glory of Old IU! MBA tailgates and visits to Assembly Hallare wonderful reprieves from the classroom. Socialize with classmates over a cold beverage and hot bowl of jambalaya, and swin in a sea of red and white—excuse me, “cream and crimson."

IU Auditorium
What do Tony Bennet, Yo-Yo Ma and Lil Wayne have in common? Not much, aside from their recent performances at the IU Auditorium. Due to the Jacobs School of Music's illustrious reputation, world-renowned talent comes to town for all to enjoy. So whether you prefer the brilliance of Yo-Yo Ma, or the boisterousness of Lil Wayne, there’s bound to be something for your selective ear.

Weekend Trip to Indy
If you’re searching for cosmopolitan-based entertainment and cuisine, or simply a weekend getaway, Indianapolis is a fun and convenient destination. In only an hour drive to the north, you can catch a Colts NFL game, partake in the Indy 500, explore the Art Museum and destress.

Film Festival at IU Cinema
Love a good film? Who doesn’t? Each year, the Middle Coast Film Festivaltakes place right here in Bloomington. A wonderful attraction for movie followers and aficionados, this event portrays a wide array of shorts, documentaries and features. Held downtown in the Buskirk-Chumley Theater, a retro 1960’s-styled film house, the MCFF is a local must.

Topo’s 403
There are many great places to eat here in Bloomington, but Topo’s 403 tops my list. Hidden by its unusual exterior, 403 is easily mistaken as mid-colonial styled home. A fantastic place to bring a date or your visiting mom, this hidden gem possesses a mouthwatering menu. I recommend the lamb and pita. Or the grilled swordfish. Actually, scratch that, go for the Indiana Ribeye.

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What are your favorite things about Bloomington? Join in on the discussion using the hashtag #BtownAudit.
Other Kelley MBA Btown Audits:

Bloomington Audit, John W. Scott, MBA’16
Bloomington Audit, Sulay Alvarenga, MBA’15
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Congratulations, Class of 2016! [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2016, 18:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Congratulations, Class of 2016!
You've come so far in two years. All of the faculty and staff at the Kelley Full-Time MBA Program are so very proud of your tenacity, talent and perseverance. Congratulations, and good luck in all of your future endeavors.

Watch the video to relive our MBA graduation festivities, held May 6, 2016 in Bloomington.

from Kelley School of Business on Vimeo.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Location: India
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Re: Calling all Kelley (Indiana) Applicants: (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2016, 22:39
Just got this mail...anybody else on the same boat???

Dear xxx,

We appreciate your interest in the Kelley MBA Program and thank you for your patience with the admissions process. As our final admissions deadline has passed, we would like to reconfirm your interest in the Kelley MBA Program. While there is not a set timeline for waitlist decisions, we will be taking a closer look at waitlisted candidates over the coming weeks. Please respond by this Wednesday, May 11, to reconfirm your interest in remaining on the waitlist. Please also let us know if you wish to be removed from consideration. Thank you for your attention to this request.

The Kelley MBA Admissions Team

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Re: Calling all Kelley (Indiana) Applicants: (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2016, 13:07
just got acceptance ... is there an admitted students group on facebook / whatsapp?

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Re: Calling all Kelley (Indiana) Applicants: (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2016, 14:14
jonnnnnix wrote:
just got acceptance ... is there an admitted students group on facebook / whatsapp?

Congos man!!!

Sent from my ONE A2003 using Tapatalk

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Freak Out, But Be OK [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2016, 14:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Freak Out, But Be OK
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Anoop Bethapudy, MBA'16, and fellow Kelley Full-Time MBA students worked with
the Native American community in California during GLOBASE Native 2016.

by Anoop Bethapudy, MBA’16

The ability to write in a way that inspires and fosters teamwork is a key to great leadership. In collaboration with the Gotham Writers Workshop, students in the Kelley MBA Leadership Academy have produced a series of blog posts to demonstrate these skills.

I was 20 years old. I had no real work experience, no funds, no team and a concert (with some of India’s best artists) to put on. Fast forward seven years and this time I was trying to lead a Global Business and Social Enterprise (GLOBASE) consulting project. Déjà vu! I had no clients, no team and no idea where to start. I remember sitting in a conference room with Rachel Fleishman, our staff coordinator, and all of the previous GLOBASE leaders. They were trying to give me tons of important information but I barely understood any of it. It was like being in the Core again!

As you may have already guessed, I pulled off both these projects (I wouldn’t write about them otherwise). As much as I would like to talk about my sheer brilliance, that is not the point of this blog and perhaps not the reality either. When I was 20 years old, I freaked out, complained and worried, but eventually made it. At 27 and with a Kelley MBA behind me, I freak out but I know it's OK. Ambiguity is just natural.

Back in college ambiguity was everything but natural. It was unfair that sponsors didn’t respond. It was frustrating that stakeholders didn’t have the information they were supposed to have. And it was scary delegating tasks only to wonder if the task was understood. The consequences were sleepless nights, tons of anxiety and my first true encounter with stress. I was exhausted, unmotivated and irritable. My anxiety would sometimes lead to counterproductive outbursts. The stress had an impact on my academics and just the general feeling of tiredness meant it was taking a toll on my physical health. The outcomes, however, were good. We had record attendance and concertgoers raved about the experience. I still wondered about my leadership. Was there something I could have done better?

Contrast that with today, more precisely 10 months before today. I had been accepted as a GLOBASE Native leader and the ambiguity came back to haunt me again. Like the title of this blog, I freaked out but this time I knew it was fine. I didn’t think it was unfair, frustrating or scary. Things were how they were and I was determined to be successful. After all, isn’t that what I learned in the Kelley Full-Time MBA Program? So here goes my magic mantra for being a GLOBASE leader, derived from my MBA learnings.

Step 1: Trust
When dealing with uncertainty, I realized that a team of four is better than one. Diverse minds bring forth diverse ideas. Collectively we could identify opportunities and threats that I could not have done on my own. But for all this to happen, I needed to trust my team. I relied on their conclusions, accepted their decisions and believed we would do our parts. I know what you are thinking but no, it was not blind trust. We respected each other to clarify and verify whenever needed but we knew we were united in trying to create an awesome GLOBASE experience. It’s a stress reliever, knowing someone has your back.

Step 2: Fail Fast
When things were uncertain with GLOBASE, we made assumptions and put it to the test. Yes, a number of our assumptions turned out wrong and we failed, but in the quick failure we were better equipped for the next iteration. It’s hard to make wild assumptions, but it is necessary. It turns out that sometimes crazy assumptions are right but most of the time they are not. Either way you are one step closer to finding out what is right.

Step 3: Plan for Contingencies
Another interesting fact about failure is that it will happen. With something that has many moving parts like GLOBASE, something is bound to go wrong. Guess what? That’s OK, too. The more you embrace the possibility of failure, the easier to plan for it. I remember Tim Hoch (one of GLOBASE Native’s guest speakers) telling us that game plans would change and we had to be prepared to adapt. He was right. We had problems in communication, scheduling, last minute drop-outs and a whole host of things that went wrong. When we actively planned for them, we knew exactly what had to be done. Let’s just say there is peace in knowing there is a Plan B.

So what was the consequence of my new approach to ambiguity? For one, we were successful. Our clients were wowed and our partner organization is excited about continuing to work with us. The participants learnt a lot and had a lot of fun in the process. My team and I were very proud, when a few informed us of their interest in leading GLOBASE Native based on this year’s experience.
As for me, I built strong lasting relationships. I managed my class load, GLOBASE and other extracurricular activities with much less stress. I expanded my network by at least 20 other Kelleys. I had the privilege to learn about the diverse Native American cultures. Lastly, I evolved as a leader.

As I sit back in the graduate lounge, typing these last few sentences, I think about what I would like to tell the 20-year-old me. I would tell him, "When you are faced with a mission, you will never know everything. There is always uncertainty. Freak out if you have to, but trust your team, fail as fast as you can and plan for contingencies. Go lead!"
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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You've Just Started your New Job. Now What? [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2016, 12:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: You've Just Started your New Job. Now What?
by Rebecca Cook, Director of Kelley Graduate Career Services

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Rebecca Cook
We’ve all been there. You’ve accepted your “dream” job, maybe moved to a new city or new apartment, and now it’s DAY 1. You’re likely nervous and excited all at once. It is a new start for you and you want to do well, impress people and enjoy it. So, how can you make sure that happens?

For both internships and full-time positions, there are several key things to focus on that can help you to be successful.

Promote yourself.
Get to know your role and organization and figure out where you can contribute early. There is likely some low-hanging fruit you can pick, so focus on that to get yourself off to a good start. Ask questions and give your opinion. This is the perfect time to ask about how things work and how you can add value. You are your best cheerleader and others will not always notice all that you are doing.

Understand the company.
How does it make money? What does the organizational structure look like? How does work get done? What is the culture and etiquette? Read as much as you can about your new company, both in company produced documents and outside information. The more knowledge you have about your organization, the better you can contribute and make decisions.

Understand your role and how you are evaluated.
Who will be evaluating you and when? Who had the role before you did and why did they leave? What were they working on and what did they leave unfinished? Who are the key stakeholders that you need to get to know?  How do you fit in to the overall organization? Getting an understanding of this is extremely important to being successful in your role.

Communicate, communicate, communicate.
You need to understand how to work with your new boss. How do they want to get and give information? Email, verbal, etc.? Make sure that you set up one-on-ones regularly if they don’t do it right away. Start with one meeting a month. Also make sure to schedule a 90-day review with your supervisor to make sure you are on the right track. It’s much easier to take the time to make sure you are staying on the right track rather than working on something for months and finding out you are on the wrong path.

Network—both internally and externally.
Start internally and get to know your team and your supervisor(s) and then work your way outwards to others in the division and organization. Get to know everyone who will be a stakeholder in what you are working on, no matter what department they call home. Externally, join organizations or groups for like-minded individuals and others who work in the same function and/or industry. The more you get to know people, the better they will like you and be willing to respond when you need them.

Lastly, make sure to take some time for yourself to get settled in. Good luck in that new role!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Kelley Alumni Receive Free Career Support for Life [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 12:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Kelley Alumni Receive Free Career Support for Life
by Kendell Brown, Associate Director of Alumni Career Services 

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Kendell Brown
At the Kelley School of Business, the Graduate Career Services staff considers alumni career services to be about lifetime career support. We are here for Kelley alumni at all stages of their careers. On-campus career services teams focus on understanding a student’s values and interests to help with a job search and getting off to a good start. Alumni career services marries that initial knowledge with the knowledge that comes with experience and being “in the real world” to set and achieve career development goals.

For short term planning, almost all of my conversations are about the next career step—a promotion, an external job search or a career pivot (“I’m in finance but I’d like to get into marketing.”).

When it comes to mid-term planning, those discussions are more about having a broad career goal and the moves necessary to achieve it. We talk about expanding an alum’s responsibility scope, enhancing and expanding strengths and building visibility.

Kelley’s alumni career services support is free and unlimited. This is a testament to how much we value our alumni. I’ve talked with my colleagues in other schools' alumni career services offices and they are stunned that I meet with each alum as often as he or she likes and at no cost. In this respect, Kelley is truly singular.

Fundamentally, what we offer is 1-1 individualized career development support. My interactions with alumni tend to go down one of two paths: executional and strategic.

Executional support is often part of a job search, so things like resume reviews, mock interviews and LinkedIn assessments are common. However, I also take time to create networking plans and career assessments with alumni.

Strategic coaching is more about career visioning and identifying motivators to guide alumni toward their ideal future.

Wherever you are in your career, I am happy to work with you and help you achieve your career goals. Please contact me to start the conversation.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Look in the mirror. What do you see? [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2016, 12:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Look in the mirror. What do you see?
by Kendell Brown, Associate Director Alumni Career Services

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Often alums and clients contact me wanting to initiate a job search but they’re at a loss as to where to start.  All that they know is that they want to start now!  So to jumpstart their thinking, I’ll have them assess where they are today.  Self-evaluation is a great way to inventory who you are, what you have to offer and where you want to go.  Here are the six areas I encourage someone to consider and the order to consider them. 

Strengths – What do you do well? 
I encourage people to start here.  It’s typically an easy assessment to make.  If you’re stuck or too modest to reflect on your strengths look at old performance reviews.  Or think about what you like to do best and/or what comes easiest to you. 

Transferrable skills – What will you leverage?
This is a natural next step from strengths.  Transferrable skills are those skills that you have that can be applied across a variety of positions.  Meaning if you’ve got a strong drive for results in your current role – you’ll have a strong drive for results in your next one.  Typically, there’s a high degree of overlap between transferrable skills and strengths.  Although, you should be aware that it’s not necessary for a transferrable skill to be a strength.

Industries/Functions/Roles – What positions appeal to you?
At the start of a job search, there’s an immense number of opportunities to pursue.  Now that you’ve thought through what you do well and what can be applied elsewhere, you need to start thinking about what specifically you want to do.   Gaining clarity at this point will stop you from feeling overwhelmed by choices.  This focus will eventually lead to a manageable set of jobs to pursue. 

Challenges – What hinders your progress?
Now’s the time to get real with yourself.  Take a look at your work history, successes and failures.  What is going to give a recruiter reason to toss your application?  Were all of your successes from a long time ago?  Have you job hopped, a lot?  Are you making such a significant change that it makes people scratch their heads?  Whatever your challenge is (you’re kidding yourself, if you don’t think you have any) – recognize it and develop a plan to overcome (or at least minimize) it.

Criteria – What are you imperatives?
These are your must haves.  What must an offer include for you to say “yes”?  Imperatives are individualized and don’t need to make sense to anyone but you.  Maybe you’ve lived your whole life in Chicago and all of you friends and family are in Chicago, so it’s imperative that you get a job in Chicago.  Or alternatively, the same is true and you’ll work anywhere but Chicago.  Doesn’t matter – if it’s a “take it or leave it” decision point, it should be on your list of criteria.

Goals – What do you want?
The final step in kicking off your search.  Of course, your number one goal is – the role you want.  However, goals should also keep you honest.  So what else is important in your search?  Timing - do you want a new job by next Spring?  Responsibilities- do you want to start managing a team?  Career development – is this next role setting you up to achieve your long term career plans? 

Yes, there’s a lot more reflection that you’ll do throughout your search.  There’s a good chance that you’ll update and revise you’re your answers to the six categories.  In the meantime, this self-review will allow you to begin.  Good luck!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Cutting the Cord - Best Practices for Transitioning within the same Or [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2016, 08:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Cutting the Cord - Best Practices for Transitioning within the same Organization
by Stephanie J. Gray, Associate Director, Graduate Career Services

Image
Stephanie J. Gray
You did it! You set your sights on a new position within your organization and after months of networking and interviewing you have earned a new title and a new set of job responsibilities.  However, there’s one problem, you still work at the same company, so leaving your old job isn’t as easy as handing in two weeks’ notice.  Your previous supervisor may have advocated for your promotion and your clients may not really understand how you work for the same organization, but can no longer help them.  I recently made this transition and I have come up with a few helpful tips to “cut the cord” with your old job and start your new adventure.

    1.       Take time off – This is something that I wish I had done.  If you have the opportunity, definitely take a week off to decompress your old job and get excited for the new one.  This week will also help you to distance yourself from your previous position without having new responsibilities just yet. 

    2.       Accept that there will be a transition time –You likely haven’t changed building locations, just offices, so you feel like the same person, but you are a new employee in THIS office.  Allow yourself some time to adjust to the new responsibilities.

3.       Redefine success – What made you successful at your last job may not be what makes you successful at your new one.  Usually moving up or over will require a different set of skills, some that may be completely foreign to you. Refer to tips #2 and #5 for some ways to start that redefining process.

4.       Follow through on your commitments - There was probably this euphoric feeling of knowing that the parts of your old job that may have not been your favorite tasks, were no longer on your plate.  However, you are still at the same company and will want to make sure that you follow through on all of your previous commitments.  For me that meant making sure that any projects I was working on during my transition, had a new point person that was up to speed.  I did this by meeting weekly for just 30 minutes with the new project lead to answer any questions he/she had about the project. 

5.       Make your new job the priority – It will be easy to answer emails with questions regarding your old position because you know those answers and feel like an expert.  They already know that you were good at your old job, that is how you got this fancy new one!  Now make time to learn the ropes.

6.       Come in on time and stay all day – You may have gotten to a point with your last position where you were such a high performer that you were able to have a more flexible schedule.  If you have done it once, you will likely master this new job too, but for now, make sure the staff in your new office knows that you are a considerate and professional co-worker. Show up early and come prepared to every meeting.

7.       Share your network – Because you come from a different office and background, you likely have a whole network of different people and valuable knowledge from another area.  Share what you know and connect your new co-workers with someone in your network if their expertise would be helpful.
 
8.       Assist in the transition plan when appropriate but don’t overstep! - This one will definitely vary by the company culture.  There was a bit of lag time between when I left my old position to the time the new person was able to start. During the transition, I did a little double duty, with permission from my new supervisors.  However, at the end of the day, I do work in a different area now, and I had to remove myself from any important decisions made at the previous office. 

9.       Let go!– Believe it or not, your old office will function just fine without you. There may be a couple of weeks where they are understaffed, but business will go on.  When it’s time to finally cut the cord permanently, embrace your new role completely.  

      So there you have it; what I have learned during my work transition.  Being within the first 90 days means that you haven’t proven yourself just yet, but remember, you have a lot of internal advocates and you earned this!  So overall, set boundaries but be respectful of the advocates that may have helped you get where you are now. The great thing about an internal move is you know the overall organization, you’ve got established mentors and you don’t have to find a new route to work!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Look In The Mirror. What Do You See? [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Look In The Mirror. What Do You See?
by Kendell Brown, Associate Director of Alumni Career Services
Kelley Graduate Career Services

Image
Kendell Brown
Often alums and clients contact me wanting to initiate a job search but they’re at a loss as to where to start. All that they know is that they want to start now! So to jumpstart their thinking, I’ll have them assess where they are today. Self-evaluation is a great way to inventory who you are, what you have to offer and where you want to go. Here are the six areas I encourage someone to consider and the order to consider them. 

Strengths – What do you do well? 
I encourage people to start here.  It’s typically an easy assessment to make. If you’re stuck or too modest to reflect on your strengths look at old performance reviews. Or think about what you like to do best and/or what comes easiest to you. 

Transferrable skills – What will you leverage?
This is a natural next step from strengths. Transferrable skills are those skills that you have that can be applied across a variety of positions. Meaning if you’ve got a strong drive for results in your current role – you’ll have a strong drive for results in your next one. Typically, there’s a high degree of overlap between transferrable skills and strengths. Although, you should be aware that it’s not necessary for a transferrable skill to be a strength.

Industries/Functions/Roles – What positions appeal to you?
At the start of a job search, there’s an immense number of opportunities to pursue. Now that you’ve thought through what you do well and what can be applied elsewhere, you need to start thinking about what specifically you want to do.  Gaining clarity at this point will stop you from feeling overwhelmed by choices. This focus will eventually lead to a manageable set of jobs to pursue. 

Challenges – What hinders your progress?
Now’s the time to get real with yourself. Take a look at your work history, successes and failures.  What is going to give a recruiter reason to toss your application? Were all of your successes from a long time ago?  Have you job hopped, a lot? Are you making such a significant change that it makes people scratch their heads? Whatever your challenge is (you’re kidding yourself, if you don’t think you have any) – recognize it and develop a plan to overcome (or at least minimize) it.

Criteria – What are you imperatives?
These are your must haves. What must an offer include for you to say “yes”? Imperatives are individualized and don’t need to make sense to anyone but you. Maybe you’ve lived your whole life in Chicago and all of you friends and family are in Chicago, so it’s imperative that you get a job in Chicago. Or alternatively, the same is true and you’ll work anywhere but Chicago. Doesn’t matter – if it’s a “take it or leave it” decision point, it should be on your list of criteria.

Goals – What do you want?
The final step in kicking off your search. Of course, your number one goal is – the role you want.  However, goals should also keep you honest. So what else is important in your search? Timing - do you want a new job by next Spring?  Responsibilities- do you want to start managing a team? Career development – is this next role setting you up to achieve your long term career plans? 

Yes, there’s a lot more reflection that you’ll do throughout your search. There’s a good chance that you’ll update and revise you’re your answers to the six categories. In the meantime, this self-review will allow you to begin. Good luck!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Cutting the Cord: Best Practices for Transitioning Within the Same Org [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: Cutting the Cord: Best Practices for Transitioning Within the Same Organization
by Stephanie J. Gray, Associate Director
Kelley Graduate Career Services

Image
Stephanie J. Gray
You did it! You set your sights on a new position within your organization and after months of networking and interviewing you have earned a new title and a new set of job responsibilities. There’s one problem: you still work at the same company, so leaving your old job isn’t as easy as handing in two weeks' notice. Your previous supervisor may have advocated for your promotion and your clients may not really understand how you work for the same organization, but can no longer help them.

I recently made this transition and I have come up with a few helpful tips to “cut the cord” with your old job and start your new adventure.

Take time off.
This is something that I wish I had done. If you have the opportunity, take a week off to decompress and get excited for your new role. This week will also help you to distance yourself from your previous position without having new responsibilities.

Accept that there will be a transition time.
You likely haven’t changed building locations, so you might feel like the same person, but you are a new employee in THIS office. Allow yourself some time to adjust to the new responsibilities.

 Redefine success.
What made you successful at your last job may not be what makes you successful at your new one.  Usually moving up or over will require a different set of skills, some that may be completely foreign to you.


Follow through on your commitments.
There was probably this euphoric feeling of knowing that the parts of your old job that may have not been your favorite tasks, were no longer on your plate. However, you are still at the same company and will want to make sure that you follow through on all of your previous commitments. For me that meant making sure that any projects I was working on during my transition, had a new point person that was up to speed. I did this by meeting weekly for just 30 minutes with the new project lead to answer any questions he/she had about the project.

Make your new job the priority.
It will be easy to answer emails with questions regarding your old position because you know those answers and feel like an expert. They already know that you were good at your old job, that is how you got this fancy new one! Now make time to learn the ropes.

Come in on time and stay all day.
You may have gotten to a point with your last position where you were such a high performer that you were able to have a more flexible schedule. If you have done it once, you will likely master this new job too, but for now, make sure the staff in your new office knows that you are a considerate and professional co-worker. Show up early and come prepared to every meeting.

Share your network.
Because you come from a different office and background, you likely have a whole network of different people and valuable knowledge from another area. Share what you know and connect your new co-workers with someone in your network if their expertise would be helpful.

Assist in the transition plan when appropriate but don’t overstep!
This one will definitely vary by the company culture. There was a bit of lag time between when I left my old position to the time the new person was able to start. During the transition, I did a little double duty, with permission from my new supervisors.  However, at the end of the day, I do work in a different area now, and I had to remove myself from any important decisions made at the previous office.

Let go!
Believe it or not, your old office will function just fine without you. There may be a couple of weeks where they are understaffed, but business will go on.  When it’s time to finally cut the cord permanently, embrace your new role completely.  

      So there you have it; what I have learned during my work transition. Being within the first 90 days means that you haven’t proven yourself just yet, but remember, you have a lot of internal advocates and you earned this. Set boundaries but be respectful of the advocates that may have helped you get where you are now. The great thing about an internal move is you know the overall organization, you’ve got established mentors and you don’t have to find a new route to work!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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The Consortium and Kelley: Enhancing Diversity in Business Starts Here [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2016, 12:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: The Consortium and Kelley: Enhancing Diversity in Business Starts Here
by Ruby Jones, MBA’18
Consortium Fellow
Winner of the Wallace L. Jones Fellowship

Image
Ruby Jones
On Tuesday, March 8, I received a beautiful cream and crimson box announcing my acceptance to the Kelley School of Business as a Consortium Fellow. Four hours later, I quit my job.

Quitting was not on my “To Do” list for the day, but I was so overcome with emotion and excitement that I couldn’t wait any longer. I should clarify that by “quit”, I mean I gave a four-month notice, but after nine years with the same employer four months can seem like a short notice. As word of my departure spread, I was bombarded with questions: What is the Consortium? What is a Consortium Fellow? Why an MBA? Why now?

What is the Consortium?

The mission of The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management is to enhance diversity in business education and leadership by helping to correct the serious underrepresentation of African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans in business schools and corporate management.  

In its 50th year, the Consortium assists in recruiting promising students, of any race, who show a commitment to its mission, to attend 18 of the top business schools. In exchange for their commitment, students receive access to a close-knit on-campus family, a powerful network of more than 8,500 alumni, early exposure to internship recruiters and, for many, full-tuition fellowships from their respective universities.

What qualities define a Consortium Fellow?

My commitment to the Consortium’s mission began before my knowledge of the organization. As a child, I pledged a portion of my allowance each year to support the United Negro College Fund. Although I did not fully understand the impact, I knew I was helping students who looked like me attend college and join the workforce. This support of diversity grew throughout my undergraduate studies, AmeriCorps Vista service and work experience.

At Kelley, this commitment has continued through accepting a leadership role on campus with the Curriculum Advisory Committee and participation in Kelley Consortium activities. In the coming months, there will be various opportunities to assist Consortium candidates in navigating the admissions process. Although work is abundant and time is limited, I will make myself available to those candidates, because the ability to build and support diverse leadership is critical for future success.

celebration weekend on Oct. 7-8[/b], I can’t help but think about my future support of the Consortium’s mission and Kelley’s commitment. How will I use my MBA to assist the next generation of diverse Kelley leaders?

0 0 1 813 4636 Indiana University 38 10 5439 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE
How will you?
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Re: Calling all Kelley (Indiana) Applicants: (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2016, 18:47
BrainFog wrote:
Those who got interview invites, can you please tell us how long it took Kelley to respond? Also what was the mode of communication, email?



I applied in round 1 and I received invite within a week of the completion of my application.

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MBA Talk: Why Kelley? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2016, 09:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: MBA Talk: Why Kelley?
Each year, aspiring business leaders from all over the world choose Kelley for their MBA. We asked them why.

Six current Kelleys from the Class of 2017—Lauren Maggion, Aaron Millicans, Guillermo Kalen, Erica Smith, Paul Carlson and Ryan Bradley—reveal what clinched it for Kelley in their MBA search.

Support at all Stages:

Image
Lauren Maggion
“I initially stumbled on Kelley when I moved my friend to Bloomington for her Ph.D. I emailed the MBA program office to see if anyone was around, and they immediately responded that they would be happy to visit with me even during the summer! The visit to campus was great and solidified my interest in certain program aspects – the core, the small class size, and the post-grad opportunities. Once I applied, the outreach I received from current students was awesome. I was able to meet with alumni in New York City, and a lot of them reminded me that it is totally possible to be on the East or West Coast despite going to school in the Midwest. I visited Kelley once more during experience weekend and really decided to attend because of the fit of the Kelley Family. From everyone I spoke with, there was an innate sense of collaboration, and people that wanted to help me succeed.” –Lauren

“The culture of Kelley is very difficult to summarize, but it can be boiled down to supportive and flexible. Kelley has a very supportive and understanding attitude that allows all students to pursue a career of their choice. Regardless of industry, role or location, the Kelley faculty and staff want to understand your goals and aspirations in order to make them a reality.” –Aaron

“Collaboration is something you feel from the moment you make contact and then confirm again later at interview season, surrounded by colleagues/competition that are supporting you, and you supporting them. [Kelley] is a place where you master team building and learn about the power of relationships. You experience this with your colleagues, the amazing alumni network, your faculty and staff.” –Guillermo 

A Proven Track Record:

Image
Erica Smith
“I chose to pursue my MBA at Kelley because I was confident that its program would help me achieve my career goal of becoming a world-class brand manager. In my eyes, the significant presence of Kelley alumni at premier companies such as Procter & Gamble and General Mills demonstrated that a Kelley MBA is well-respected within the consumer packaged goods industry.  I also saw that several Kelley women alums have risen to the rank of chief executive officer of marketing-oriented organizations like Popeye’s and Quiznos—which made me feel like I could walk in their shoes one day. Given the success of Kelley’s vast alumni network, I felt that a Kelley MBA would equip me with the skills to not only manage a brand but lead an organization one day.” –Erica

“The staff not only is collaborative, but highly prepared. Kelley has repeatedly ranked in top positions for its Graduate Career Services, and the majority of its students have great jobs before graduation. As an international candidate, I considered this to be essential if I wanted to have professional experience in the USA, since companies are looking for a highly prepared individual, both academically and professionally.” –Guillermo

Kelley Culture:

“One of the aspects of the Kelley MBA Program I have enjoyed most is the opportunity to meet and work with students from all over the world. During the Integrated Core during my first year, I worked on a team with a student from Bangalore, India—who is the most brilliant person I’ve ever met. The cultural and technical learnings he has imparted to me during our time together have been invaluable, and I know our bond with last through the years to come. I also had the opportunity to work on a consulting project for a small bakery in Ghana called Ladl Patisserie during my first year—which was another international, interactive learning experience I truly enjoyed.” –Erica

Image
Paul Carlson
“I was attracted to Kelley because of the family-like culture, the academic structure, and the potential network that I could leverage to help support my transition out of the military. My family and I felt welcomed, valued, and part of the community.  The size of the classes and the number of veteran students were also contributing factors because I felt like I could create strong professional and personal bonds with my peers, professors, and staff.”  –Paul

“I was nervous about returning to Kelley since I had already experienced Kelley and IU as an undergrad.  I was worried that I wouldn’t get a unique academic experience the second time around.  I was worried that recruiters would find two degrees from the same institution pointless.  I was worried that IU basketball games wouldn’t be as fun in my early 30s as they were in my early 20’s. Looking back I can’t believe I even considered going anywhere except Kelley….especially because basketball games and football tailgates are DEFINITELY as enjoyable the second time around!” –Ryan
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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A Job Seeker’s Guide to Dealing with Rejection [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2016, 14:01
FROM Kelley MBA Blog: A Job Seeker’s Guide to Dealing with Rejection
Image
Written based on the expertise of Christina Schmidt, Associate Director of Business Marketing – Kelley Graduate Career Services

Clichés like, “It’ll all work out” or “Everything happens for a reason” are a whole lot easier to say than to hear, aren’t they? But at some point or another, failure is inevitable, and you won’t get exactly what you had hoped for. The supportive, caring people in your life will listen, sympathize, and then throw out something along those lines intending to cheer you up. Often those phrases can have the opposite intended effect, but don’t let a bitter reaction tarnish the truth in those words. Remember, you always have a choice – even when those choices aren’t about which job opportunity to pursue. When your only choice is how you’ll respond, consider the following before reacting.
You’ve built a network. This is extremely valuable, so work to maintain it. Maybe there was someone just *slightly* more qualified for that job. But what about your dream job they’re just about to post? Chances are, employees on the inside know of roles coming open before everyone else. By working to maintain your network, your internal contact might be able to 1) tell you about the position before it’s made public, or 2) say they know someone who would be a great match for the role.

It’s a chance to improve. Around Kelley, we call this an after action review: figuring out what went right and what went wrong. The key to this one is honesty. You have to be honest with yourself or whomever you’re talking to about why you truly didn’t get the job. There are a million and one excuses in the book. Don’t be someone who makes excuses. Be someone who takes responsibility for what happened and takes action to never let it happen again.

Use the opportunity to take a break. Sometimes we can get so focused on the job we applied for that stepping back from the situation to get yourself in the right frame of mind will do much more for you than hours of interview prep ever could. What’s your favorite escape from reality? Listening to a TED talk, working out, reading a book? The important thing to realize is it’s only a break. Don’t quit. When you’re ready, come up with a plan of action in how you’re going to move on. Don’t go it alone, either – this is a great time to bring in a coach, industry professional, or mentor you trust to bounce ideas off and hold you accountable.

Rejection’s never easy, but don’t let missing out on one opportunity lead to squandering two. By using rejection to fuel your progress, you’ll end up in a place better than you ever imagined!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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A Job Seeker’s Guide to Dealing with Rejection   [#permalink] 01 Dec 2016, 14:01

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