GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 19 Jan 2020, 13:11

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2019, 14:51
09173140521 wrote:
Hi Mr.Charles
I would be happy if you answer this question.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/neanderthals ... l#p2335090



Neanderthals had a vocal tract that resembled those of the apes and so were probably without language, a shortcoming that may explain why they were supplanted by our own species.
correct =(B) Neanderthals had a vocal tract resembling an ape’s



please explain how "resembling" can modify a thing in the past ??????? I SAW "-ing" modifier only in present tense be correct and many question wrong because of using -ing modifier in past .......BUT in this case it use for past tense !

in other word = "a vocal tract that resemble an ape's" or "a vocal tract that resembled an ape's" which is correct.? :please
tnx in advance.

I think I see the confusion. The key here is that "-ing" words such as "resembling" are usually not verbs at all. (They can be verbs, of course, but that's not the case here.) In this context, "resembling" is an adjective, just modifying "a vocal tract." And adjectives NEVER have a tense, so you really don't have to worry about the timeline at all. It's fine to say "a vocal tract resembling an ape's" -- and it would also be fine to say "a vocal tract that resembled an ape's."

This article on the various uses of "-ing" words might help with this issue. And here's another example of the word "resembling" in a really tough GMATPrep question.

I hope this helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2019, 15:45
sanchawla wrote:
When releasing an animal that has lived in captivity back into a wild environment, zoologists can never be sure whether it will successfully adapt to its new habitat.

A. releasing an animal that has lived in captivity back into a wild environment, zoologists can never be sure whether it will successfully adapt to its new habitat

B. an animal that has lived in captivity is released back into a wild environment, zoologists can never be sure if it will successfully adapt to its new habitat

C. releasing an animal back into a wild environment that has lived in captivity, zoologists can never be sure whether it will successfully adapt to its new habitat

D. an animal is released back into a wild environment that has lived in captivity, zoologists can never be sure if it will successfully adapt to its new habitat

E. an animal that has lived in captivity is released back into a wild environment, zoologists can never be sure whether it will successfully adapt to its new habitat or not

The answer is A but I marked E - is using ing form of verb with When appropriate? Why is E wrong?

This is a non-official question, so I wouldn't lose much sleep over this exact case. But there's no reason why we couldn't say "when releasing" or "when + '-ing' verb". Here, have an example:

    When eating a plate of particularly spicy bhindi masala, Wilbur sometimes grunts with pleasure.

No problem, right? We're just indicated that Wilbur performs a certain action while eating bhindi masala.

In answer choice (E), the GMAT seems to frown upon the use of "whether or not", because the "or not" is apparently redundant. But again, I wouldn't spend too much time overanalyzing non-official questions.

I hope this helps a bit!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2019, 16:04
Fahad222 wrote:
Hi GMAT-Ninja,

I had a small doubt regarding the Sentence Correction questions.
I am not pretty clear on finding the errors in the given original sentence.
As a result, my approach to solve the problem is still a bit sketchy.
Any strategy,as to what errors should I be looking for initially in the sentence.

Posted from my mobile device


RB95 wrote:
Hi Charles,

Hope you are doing Great. I request your advice on GMAT SC.
I have given the GMATPrep Mock last week and scored 630 (V31 Q47)

I feel SC is my weakest section.

I started my prep with Manhattan Prep SC this week, but its becoming very difficult to remember so many grammar rules without sufficient number of Qns in the Problem sets.

I am a bit lost as to how to proceed? I am currently planning to do one section every week, Eg: - SC current week followed by CR and RC the following week. Is this a proper way to go about verbal?

Also should I be solving OG simultaneously as I go through Manhattan prep SC or should I proceed with solving OG after I complete the Manhattan Prep?

Look forward to your advice.

Note: I am having my GMAT exam in Exactly 85 Days

Thanks

Sorry, I might be too late to be helpful for you two -- and it might not be possible to sufficiently answer such broad questions in a single post, anyway -- but here are a couple of thoughts:

  • If you're not sure what to prioritize when you first see an SC question, check out this article, or this video and this follow-up.
  • If you really want a firehose of SC videos, there are a bunch on this thread, though they aren't really designed to be a coherent test-prep program, so they aren't necessarily in any particular order. But broadly speaking, the videos will help give you an idea of the types of errors that are the most important.
  • Everybody is different, but I personally don't think that memorizing tons and tons of rules is the best way to succeed on SC. You'll see that general idea throughout the videos and articles above.
  • Binging on one question type at a time is never a good idea. You'll have to do everything on your test day, so generally speaking, you'll want every week of your prep to include at least some practice with every aspect of the test.

I hope that helps a bit!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2019, 16:32
deeeuce wrote:
Hi GMATNinja,

great work on putting up the youtube videos. Loved them.
I have a confusion about the use of "being". Would really appreciate if you would help me understand the correct use of the word "being" in sentence correction. Couple resources I referred to explain the correct use of "being" in two different forms:
i. something is being.... (e.g.: The work is being done. Dont know if this is correct).
ii. Being something is.... (e.g.: "Being the president is both difficult and rewarding.")

Mostly I had deeply printed on my mind that I would cross off any answers that do not conform to these forms. But hey Bummer...! The official guide 2nd edition for verbal review has used the word "being" as below:

B The passage indicates that on average, the profitability of acquired firms fell after being acquired (lines 5–7).
[OG 2nd edition page 94]

Seeking your opinion. Thank you for being such supportive to everyone. [Now is this a correct use?]

Cheers!
Diwash.

Yeah, that's a messy topic. I wrote an article about "being" a couple of years ago, and I deliberately oversimplified the topic -- basically, I wanted to make sure that the major uses of "being" were represented. Your first two examples are very clearly covered in the article:

  • In the phrase "the work is being done", "is being" is a verb -- no problem there.
  • In the phrase "being a GMAT tutor requires a warped sense of humor", "being" is a noun (a gerund, if you like jargon) -- no problem there, either.

My article doesn't address the third case you brought up, though:

    "The passage indicates that on average, the profitability of acquired firms fell after being acquired..."

I really don't think you want to kill too many brain cells worrying about this, but this is no different than using any other "-ing" word after a preposition. Here, have another example:

    "Charlie smiled gleefully before eating his third bowl of bibimbap."

No problem, right? We write these sorts of sentences all the time: the preposition "before" is followed by an "-ing" word (a participle, if you like jargon), and that's totally fine.

The same is true of your example: "...the profitability of acquired firms fell after being acquired..."

I don't know if that's terribly helpful, to be honest. I would just think of it this way: it's going to be awfully hard to invent a whole bunch of rules for every possible use of the word "being." Instead, be aware that "being" can cause all sorts of messes when it's used as a modifier (more on that here), and don't overthink it beyond that. If you're not sure if "being" is used correctly in an official GMAT question, look for other decision points.

I hope this helps a bit!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2019, 16:55
brains wrote:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/heirloom-tomatoes-grown-from-seeds-saved-from-the-previous-year-only-75868.html#p570995

At the end of 2001, motion picture industry representatives said that there were about a million copies of Hollywood movies available online and expected piracy to increase with high-speed Internet connections that become more widely available.


(A) online and expected piracy to increase with high-speed Internet connections that become more widely available

(B) online and expect the increase of piracy with the wider availability of high-speed Internet connections

(C) online, and they expect more piracy to increase with the wider availability of high-speed Internet connections

(D) online, and that they expected the increase of piracy as high-speed Internet connections would become more widely available

(E) online, and that they expected piracy to increase as high-speed Internet connections became more widely available

Hello Charles. The above question has loosened my bolts of concepts and i will really appreciate if you could help me with my following queries

1. How would you approach this question?
2. I believe many experts are saying that "said " and expected are parallel and if they are parallel , how come in choice E , being a list of two items the "expected" item is followed by " and" preceded by a comma. Basically if we have two entities parallel why would we need comma before "and" . I thought it to be an independent clause.

Good question! First, I'd pick off some low-hanging fruit. Both (B) and (C) use the present tense "expect." The timeframe of the action is established by the phrase "at the end of 2001," so we want a past tense verb. Two down.

Next, I might ask myself whether I need "that." In (D) and (E), we have a nice parallel construction: the representative said two things: 1) that there were a million copies of movies available and 2) that they expected piracy to increase. Makes sense.

In (A), because there's no second "that" it seems as though the actions are unconnected. The representatives said there were a million copies of movies available, and perhaps unrelated, they also expected piracy to increase. This isn't fundamentally wrong, but it seems less logical than the construction we have in (D) and (E) in which it's crystal clear that the actions are connected.

Also, the phrase "expected piracy to increase with high-speed Internet connections that become more widely available," is a problem. It sounds as though piracy will increase as widely available high-speed Internet connections increase, as opposed to less-widely available Internet connections, which apparently don't increase with piracy. It makes far more sense to convey the idea that piracy will increase as the high-speed connections become more available, generally. So (A) is out.

Last, in (D), the phrase "the increase of piracy as high-speed Internet connections," makes it sound as though piracy is increasing in the form of high-speed Internet connections. A person can go to a party as a clown, but piracy cannot increase as a high-speed internet connection. Offer a brief eulogy for (D), and (E) is our winner.

As for your second question, a public service announcement: there are almost no hard rules governing comma usage. There are conventions, sure, but ultimately, commas can always be used if a writer feels as though a pause will help clarify the meaning of a sentence. So if you're debating about whether a comma is appropriate, remind yourself of this, and look for other decision points instead.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2019, 17:07
rohitchayal wrote:
GMATNinja
1.
I want to ask whether comma+verb+ed can only modify the preceding noun like this one article explained or can be behave like comma+verb+ing and modify the subject of the preceding clause? In
reference to GMAT.
2.
Can a possessive noun be parallel to a noun or a pronoun if a parallel structure is required?
eg: Jon’s car is lovely and he loves it dearly. Is this correct?
3.
Is “whose” a subordinating conjunction?

Posted from my mobile device

1. First, when we see Clause + Comma + Verb-ing, Verb-ing modifies the entire previous clause. So while the modifier needs to make sense with the subject of that clause, it isn't quite accurate to say that it's modifying that subject directly.

For example:

    "Tim squandered the family fortune on faberge eggs, resulting in a declaration of bankruptcy."

It would be odd to argue that Tim resulted in the declaration of bankruptcy. Instead, Tim's actions did. Because "resulting" logically modifies the entire previous clause, it's fine here. An "-ed" modifier can function the same way.

2. Good question! We have seen this construction in some correct OA's, so while it's very rare, it's not technically an error. Just be aware that if it creates a confusing or problematic meaning, you'd want to be wary of selecting that answer choice.

3. Don't worry about the terminology. Worry about the function.

For example:

    "Tim, whose appetite is legendary, once at an entire buffalo on a dare."

Here, "whose" is part of a modifier describing Tim. Whether you want to call it an adjective or a possessive pronoun is beside the point. Just know that it functions as a modifier here, and unlike "who," it can describe non-human entities as well.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 09 Aug 2017
Posts: 675
GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Dec 2019, 18:38
Would you please explain "Unless conditional statements" from CR point of view. Many times I get confused by answer choices.
For example. Unless tiger hunting decreases, tiger will soon extinct.

I can understand many statement from above statement.
If hunting continues, tiger will extinct.
Tigers are extinct now, tiger hunting is on.
If we wish to stop extinction of tiger, stop hunting of tiger.
Tiger hunting is increasing, tiger will soon extinct.

Sometimes it becomes tedious task to select right choice for such CR problems.
Please assist and share link which could help me to clear this doubt.

Moreover, is it correct to use double negation in unless clause?
Such as, Unless you don't pay me on time, I won't do your work.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Jul 2019
Posts: 9
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Dec 2019, 00:08
Sixty-five million years ago, according to some scientists, an asteroid bigger than Mount Everest slammed into North America, which, causing plant and animal extinctions, marks the end of the geologic era known as the Cretaceous Period.

(D) an event that caused plant and animal extinctions, which marks
(E) an event that caused the plant and animal extinctions that mark

GMATNinja Que 1 of "Sentence Correction #2 LIVE with GMAT Ninja: W is “that” doing in my sentence?"

here extinctions(p) & marks(plural) ... so why'd you say SV error ?
also, marks and end sounds correct ...so why E over D ?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Oct 2017
Posts: 8
GMAT 1: 620 Q49 V25
CAT Tests
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Dec 2019, 04:34
We know that FANBOYS + comma are used to join two independent clauses.

Can we also infer that if we see comma + AND that means one of the two things
- list of three or more items
- two independent clauses joined by AND

Experts please help.

Posted from my mobile device
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 20 Sep 2018
Posts: 115
GMAT 1: 590 Q47 V25
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Dec 2019, 16:15
Dear Gmatninja/Angel,
I have been following you for few months and also saw your you tube sessions. Thanks for guiding us.
I want to ask about next gmat club you tube sessions. Special help needed in
RC,
COORDINATE GEOMETRY and
PROBABILITY.

I v much enjoyed, so leaned from your you tube session on SC ( wrt splits and countable nouns).

I am following your advice to concentrate on OG , especially in verbal.
My last GMAT was 590, Q 47 and V 25. I made a wrong decision to start with Verbal. It proved wrong because I was very nervous, without any reason( I am saying now without reason, because nervousness ultimately hurts so better to be calm i/o being nervous and losing more points). That resulted not only in V25 but also I felt the aftershocks of the earlier negative feelings in the quant section.
Anyhow, I am also planning to prepare much better to improve my result.
I have noted your various advices very well, particularly those about how to respond to particular questions. For eg., "the long worded word Problems are not to be scared because of their length but they are rather v easy to crack" . V true , I found this. Honestly, now I more welcome such lengthy questions because they are always found easy to crack.

I personally request to make atleast one YouTube lecture on such insightful hints/ how to tackle nervousness etc.

Lastly, I again salute your contribution towards educating us, in a very positive way.
God bless you and Merry Christmas to you and your family members,

Basim

Posted from my mobile device
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Dec 2019, 22:57
Neena96 wrote:
Sixty-five million years ago, according to some scientists, an asteroid bigger than Mount Everest slammed into North America, which, causing plant and animal extinctions, marks the end of the geologic era known as the Cretaceous Period.

(D) an event that caused plant and animal extinctions, which marks
(E) an event that caused the plant and animal extinctions that mark

GMATNinja Que 1 of "Sentence Correction #2 LIVE with GMAT Ninja: W is “that” doing in my sentence?"

here extinctions(p) & marks(plural) ... so why'd you say SV error ?
also, marks and end sounds correct ...so why E over D ?

Your understanding of plural verbs isn't correct. If the subject is plural, the verb drops the 's.' For example:

    1) They want to go to the Lynyrd Skynyrd concert, but the only song they know is Free Bird.
    2) Tim and Amy fight every night, and the next day, Tim wakes up with funny indentations on his face from the couch cushions.

And so on.

This is all to say that "extinctions mark" is correct and "extinctions marks" is not.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 13 Apr 2019
Posts: 166
Location: India
Schools: Kellogg '22
GMAT 1: 650 Q50 V27
GPA: 3.85
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Dec 2019, 04:03
GMATNinja VeritasKarishma please help me with this question..
how can we identify which idiom is correct to use..i am really confused

https://gmatclub.com/forum/students-in- ... 79092.html
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 13 Apr 2019
Posts: 166
Location: India
Schools: Kellogg '22
GMAT 1: 650 Q50 V27
GPA: 3.85
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Jan 2020, 03:17
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Dec 2019
Posts: 1
CAT Tests
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2020, 05:25
he knows to swim(this sentence is grammatically wrong)
is it wrong because the sentence doesn't have an antecedent preceding it?
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Greatness begins beyond your comfort zone
Joined: 08 Dec 2013
Posts: 2443
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
Schools: Kelley '20, ISB '19
GPA: 3.2
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge CAT Tests
GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2020, 11:08
1. Verb-ed modifier-
a. When verb-ed modifier is placed in the beginning of the clause followed by a comma, then it modifies the subject of the clause.
Drafted to ban smoking in public places, the new law has caused a lot of outrage.

b. Verb-ed modifier modifies the preceding noun or the noun phrase.
This is a new law, drafted to ban smoking in public places.

2.Verb-ing modifier-

a. When a verb-ing modifier is separated from the clause using a comma, then this modifier modifies the preceding clause and it usually makes(NOT necessary though) sense with the subject of the preceding clause.
Real Madrid won the third consecutive match, reaching the finals.

b. When the verb-ing modifier is not separated from the clause using a comma, then it modifies the preceding noun.
This is the new law banning smoking in public places.

c. Characteristics of verb-ing modifiers-
1. The timeframe is the same as the main action( It can't be separated in time)
2. Must describe the main action in some way-
- Immediate, simultaneous consequence
- Further description
- Subordinate action

Rocky was struck by a bus, dying in the hospital an hour later-- This is incorrect since the actions do not occur in the same time.
Rocky was struck by a bus and died in the hospital an hour later-- This is correct
Rocky was struck by a bus, killing him on the spot. -- This is correct

Q1- In 1(b), even if we remove the comma before the verb-ed modifier 'drafted', it will modify the preceding noun 'law'?
Can a verb-ed modifier modify an entire preceding clause if preceded by a comma?

(I just saw this video titled '4 Modifiers Rules Most GMAT SC Test-Takers Get Wrong' (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVm4W8bTIRI) in which an instructor states that both verb-ing and verb-ed modifier preceded by a comma describes the entire preceding clause.)

Q2- In case of verb-ing modifiers preceded by a comma, the modifier needs to make sense with the action of the preceding clause and NEED not necessarily make sense with subject of the preceding clause(See official question below in which ice cap itself did not uncover the vast new areas but the action of melting did)

Between 14,000 and 8,000 b.c. the ice cap that covered northern Asia, Europe, and America began to melt, uncovering vast new areas that were to be occupied by migrating peoples moving northward.
(https://gmatclub.com/forum/between-14-0 ... 42405.html)

Q3- Is the above official question of ice caps an exception to rule - verb-ing modifier must make sense with the subject of the preceding clause (OR there is NO such rule)?

Q4- Can you also validate whether the characteristics of the verb-ing modifier(2c) and examples are correct?

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , GMATGuruNY , VeritasPrepBrian , MartyTargetTestPrep , DmitryFarber , VeritasKarishma , generis , jennpt , EducationAisle , other experts - please enlighten
_________________
When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. - Henry Ford
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Dec 2019
Posts: 56
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jan 2020, 07:51
That the church coined the date ‘February 14’ as Valentine’s day with an ulterior motive to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia is claimed by a few experts, but the more prevalent belief is it is celebrated on this date to honor the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial.

Hello GMATNinja,

I have a question in the above sentence. This apparently is the correct answer.

My question is Sentence starts with a subordinate clause "That the church coined ...., but the more prevalent belief" and then uses "but the" to introduce another subordinate. Isn't that incorrect or am I missing something?

Could you please help me on this?

Thanks,
Shameek
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Dec 2019
Posts: 56
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jan 2020, 07:55
One more question is regarding Verbed modifier.

"The weight of the discus used in the tournament" -> Is used modifying discus or the weight of the discus. Is it possible for Verbed modifier to ignore prepositional phrase and modify the noun directly instead of object of the preposition?

"The weight of the discus that was used in the tournament" -> Same question what is "that" modifying in this sentence?

When I read, it sounds as if the weight of the discus is being modified - Hence wanted to clear my understanding.

Thanks,
Shameek
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
D
Joined: 15 Feb 2018
Posts: 447
CAT Tests
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jan 2020, 02:02
How is it that ’since’, ’for’, and ’because’ all have the same meaning as conjunctions, yet ’for’ is a co-ordinating conjunction and ’since’ and ’before’ are subordinating conjunctions?
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jan 2020, 08:19
1
Aviral1995 wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasKarishma please help me with this question..
how can we identify which idiom is correct to use..i am really confused

https://gmatclub.com/forum/students-in- ... 79092.html

Quote:
Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming ever more dependent on information-based industries.

(A) lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

(B) lack math skills to a large enough degree that they will be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy that becomes

(C) lack of math skills is so large as to be difficult to absorb them into a city’s economy that becomes

(D) are lacking so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy becoming

(E) are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

The following dialogue might help explain the idiom:

    New Yorker #1: My bedroom is small.
    New Yorker #2: How small is your bedroom?
    New Yorker #1: My bedroom is so small that I have to sleep with my feet hanging out of the window. :(

The idiom in the final sentence is: "... so ______ that ______." That's the same idiom used in the correct answer choice, as explained in this post and others in that thread.

I hope this helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3100
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jan 2020, 11:20
shameekv1989 wrote:
That the church coined the date ‘February 14’ as Valentine’s day with an ulterior motive to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia is claimed by a few experts, but the more prevalent belief is it is celebrated on this date to honor the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial.

Hello GMATNinja,

I have a question in the above sentence. This apparently is the correct answer.

My question is Sentence starts with a subordinate clause "That the church coined ...., but the more prevalent belief" and then uses "but the" to introduce another subordinate. Isn't that incorrect or am I missing something?

Could you please help me on this?

Thanks,
Shameek

Here we actually have two independent clauses joined by the ", but"!

I think the confusion comes from the fact that the word "that" basically means "the fact that" in this situation. That's a pretty rare usage, and you don't want to obsess over it.

But if you think about it in that way, then the first half of the sentence turns into a big ol' noun clause: "{The fact that} the church coined the date ‘February 14’ as Valentine’s day with an ulterior motive to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia is claimed..." So the first half of the sentence basically boils down to, "[X] is claimed by a few experts." This is a complete sentence (independent clause).

This is no different than something like "Charlie ate 14 burritos last night."

After the ", but" we have, "the more prevalent belief is [that] it is celebrated on this date to honor the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial." This half of the sentence basically boils down to "The belief is [X]." This is also a complete sentence (independent clause).

I hope this helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar   [#permalink] 19 Jan 2020, 11:20

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   [ 220 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





cron

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne