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GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar

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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2019, 22:17
Hi Gmat Ninja,
Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable from bodily response.


(A) private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable

(B) private, are social phenomena that are inseparable

(C) private are a social phenomenon but are not those inseparable

(D) private—are social phenomena but not separable

(E) also as private emotions, are social phenomena not inseparable

I understand why all other options are incorrect , but i am curious to know in option B, correct option, how that is able to refer to emotions ?
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New post 24 Aug 2019, 07:56
Hi Ninja,

Can a prepositional phrase be both Noun and Adverbial Modifier?

Sentence: She placed the cat ON THE COUCH

I'm studying from Manhattan GMAT SC book. It says

1) If the modifier answers a question about the noun, it's a noun modifier.
2) If the modifier answers a question about the action, it's an adverbial modifier.

The modifier "ON THE COUCH" answers two questions.

1) Where is the cat? ON THE COUCH (Noun modifier)

2) Where did she place the cat? ON THE COUCH (Adverbial Modifier)

Is it possible for a propositional phrase to be both? Or my understanding of them is wrong? Please clarify. Thanks a lot.

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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2019, 22:03
Hi GMAT ninja. What is the correct usage for the words "understanding" and " to understand". Can you elaborate with an example

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New post 06 Sep 2019, 22:32
Is "Rushing the field during the football game" able to stand alone? If its possible then what is the verb here?

P.S: its from MP Foundation Gmat Verbal

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New post 08 Sep 2019, 22:35
Hi GMAT-Ninja,

I had a small doubt regarding the Sentence Correction questions.
I am not pretty clear on finding the errors in the given original sentence.
As a result, my approach to solve the problem is still a bit sketchy.
Any strategy,as to what errors should I be looking for initially in the sentence.

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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2019, 08:33
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New post 16 Sep 2019, 04:53
Hi Ninja,

Can you please explain the use of past perfect tense in this sentence (Official question, link at the end of query):

Around 1900, fishermen in the Chesapeake Bay area landed more than seventeen million pounds of shad in a single year, but by 1920, over-fishing and the proliferation of milldams and culverts that blocked shad from migrating up their spawning streams had reduced landings to less than four million pounds.

The discussions on the forum say that since the action happened before 1920 so past perfect should be used. However, there are not 2 but 3 time periods in the question - around 1900, between 1900 and 1920, and 1920. If we are using simple past for the first action/time 'around 1900, fishermen......landed....', then how is the use of past perfect justified for second time/action.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/around-1900-fishermen-in-the-chesapeake-bay-area-landed-more-than-203779.html
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 13:39
Hi GMATNinja

If I have a sentence with many "of's" e.g. hundreds of books of mammals what is the subject? What will dictate whether the verb is singular or plural? Thank you in advance.
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New post 20 Sep 2019, 06:23
https://gmatclub.com/forum/heirloom-tomatoes-grown-from-seeds-saved-from-the-previous-year-only-75868.html#p570995

At the end of 2001, motion picture industry representatives said that there were about a million copies of Hollywood movies available online and expected piracy to increase with high-speed Internet connections that become more widely available.


(A) online and expected piracy to increase with high-speed Internet connections that become more widely available

(B) online and expect the increase of piracy with the wider availability of high-speed Internet connections

(C) online, and they expect more piracy to increase with the wider availability of high-speed Internet connections

(D) online, and that they expected the increase of piracy as high-speed Internet connections would become more widely available

(E) online, and that they expected piracy to increase as high-speed Internet connections became more widely available

Hello Charles. The above question has loosened my bolts of concepts and i will really appreciate if you could help me with my following queries

1. How would you approach this question?
2. I believe many experts are saying that "said " and expected are parallel and if they are parallel , how come in choice E , being a list of two items the "expected" item is followed by " and" preceded by a comma. Basically if we have two entities parallel why would we need comma before "and" . I thought it to be an independent clause.
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New post 21 Sep 2019, 08:58
Hi Charles,

Hope you are doing Great. I request your advice on GMAT SC.
I have given the GMATPrep Mock last week and scored 630 (V31 Q47)

I feel SC is my weakest section.

I started my prep with Manhattan Prep SC this week, but its becoming very difficult to remember so many grammar rules without sufficient number of Qns in the Problem sets.

I am a bit lost as to how to proceed? I am currently planning to do one section every week, Eg: - SC current week followed by CR and RC the following week. Is this a proper way to go about verbal?

Also should I be solving OG simultaneously as I go through Manhattan prep SC or should I proceed with solving OG after I complete the Manhattan Prep?

Look forward to your advice.

Note: I am having my GMAT exam in Exactly 85 Days

Thanks
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New post 28 Sep 2019, 14:37
Federal legislation establishing a fund for the cleanup of sites damaged by toxic chemicals permits compensating state governments for damage to their natural resources but does not allow claims for injury to people.
(A) compensating state governments for damage to
(B) compensating state governments for the damaging of - Even this usage is not correct. damaging of.
(C) giving state governments compensation for damaging - for damaging changes the meaning
(D) giving compensation to state governments for the damage of
(E) the giving of compensation to state governments for damaging - for damaging changes the meaning

Between A and D, OA is A because of parallelism. Can you elaborate more on how to go about this one.
link: https://gmatclub.com/forum/federal-legi ... 37627.html
The tag says it is Pre 2000 OG question.

Thank you!
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New post 08 Oct 2019, 06:52
Hi GMATNinja

In this question, I got why (C) is the correct answer, but can you clarify why (D) is wrong? I would like to understand more about "which" usage:


Question:

Although Alice Walker published a number of essays, poetry collections, and stories during the 1970s, her third novel, The Color Purple, which was published in 1982, brought her the widest acclaim in that it won both the National Book Award as well as the Pulitzer Prize.


(A) which was published in 1982, brought her the widest acclaim in that it won both the National Book Award as well as the Pulitzer Prize

(B) published in 1982, bringing her the widest acclaim by winning both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize

(C) published in 1982, brought her the widest acclaim, winning both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize

(D) was published in 1982 and which, winning both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, brought her the widest acclaim

(E) was published in 1982, winning both the National Book Award as well as the Pulitzer Prize, and bringing her the widest acclaim
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New post 18 Oct 2019, 04:27
Hi GMATNinja,

great work on putting up the youtube videos. Loved them.
I have a confusion about the use of "being". Would really appreciate if you would help me understand the correct use of the word "being" in sentence correction. Couple resources I referred to explain the correct use of "being" in two different forms:
i. something is being.... (e.g.: The work is being done. Dont know if this is correct).
ii. Being something is.... (e.g.: "Being the president is both difficult and rewarding.")

Mostly I had deeply printed on my mind that I would cross off any answers that do not conform to these forms. But hey Bummer...! The official guide 2nd edition for verbal review has used the word "being" as below:

B The passage indicates that on average, the profitability of acquired firms fell after being acquired (lines 5–7).
[OG 2nd edition page 94]

Seeking your opinion. Thank you for being such supportive to everyone. [Now is this a correct use?]

Cheers!
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New post 21 Oct 2019, 11:31
Dear Diwash,

Vvv simple rule for the use of "being".
Try to sense from the meaning of being is indicating "a temporary phase" or not.
If yes, then use of being is ok.
If NO, then the use of "being"is wrong. So, all depends on the implied MEANING of that part of the sentence.

IMHO,
Regards

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New post 28 Oct 2019, 12:53
It is as difficult to prevent crimes against property as those that are against a person.

A) those that are against a
B) those against a
C) it is against a
D) preventing those against a
E) it is to prevent those against a



I kind of get that E) is correct, but isn't C also correct? And more concise? I get confused with such parallel constructions. Sometimes we use the verb sometimes we don't. Can you please help?
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New post 29 Oct 2019, 04:14
GMATNinja

Could you please help me with this question- https://gmatclub.com/forum/published-du ... 02278.html

I am confused b/w C and E
i rejected C beause in C we donot have a clear reference for his friend in "his friend Voltaire’s fictional Candide"

Please help
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New post 02 Nov 2019, 00:50
Hi Sir,

Hope you are doing well. Here's my doubt,

Since it is one of the world’s swiftest growers, gaining up to 1 meter a day, and can be harvested in under ten years, half the time it takes for the softest woods to mature, experts indicate that bamboo, China’s forgotten plant, should be considered “green gold”.

As per the solution, the above underlined portion is correct. My doubt is regarding the modifier. All the properties- one of the world's swiftest growers, gains 1 meter a day, and can be harvested under 10 years- talk about Bamboo plants and not about experts. Then why is it that right after the modifier, we have 'experts' as the subject or am I missing out on something? Please help.

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New post 09 Nov 2019, 10:57
I have a few questions related to Pronouns

1. When the pronoun appears as a part of the introductory modifier-

Although he spent most of his twenties and thirties as a struggling actor, Jon Hamm later gained prominence in NBC drama "Providence".
Is it necessary for Jon Hamm to immediately follow the clause that starts with although?
If later precedes Jon Hamm, will it be incorrect?

2.a. It takes great courage to prevail amidst uncertainty.
Does the pronoun "it" refers to the phrase 'to prevail amidst uncertainty'? or is it simply a placeholder?

b. Long before it was prevalent for African Americans to enter politics, Alexander Twilight became the first African American to serve in the state legislature.
Is the 'it' here a placeholder? or does it refer to phrase 'for African Americans to enter politics'?

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , GMATGuruNY , VeritasPrepBrian , MartyTargetTestPrep , DmitryFarber , VeritasKarishma , generis , other experts - please enlighten
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2019, 05:48
1
Is it necessary for Jon Hamm to immediately follow the clause that starts with although?

On the GMAT, when an introductory modifier includes a pronoun without an antecedent, the referent for the pronoun is invariably the FIRST WORD of the main clause.
Consider the following examples from the OG12:

Q7: As ITS sales of computer products have surpassed those of measuring instruments, THE COMPANY..
Q28: Building on civilizations that preceded THEM in coastal Peru, THE MOHICA...
Q31: Even though many of HER colleagues were convinced that genes were relatively simple and static, BARBARA MCCLINTOCK...

In each case, the introductory modifier includes a pronoun without an antecedent.
In each case, the referent for the pronoun is the first word of the main clause.
Be skeptical of any answer choice that violates this rule.

2.a. It takes great courage to prevail amidst uncertainty.
Does the pronoun "it" refers to the phrase 'to prevail amidst uncertainty'? or is it simply a placeholder?[/quote]

b. Long before it was prevalent for African Americans to enter politics, Alexander Twilight became the first African American to serve in the state legislature.
Is the 'it' here a placeholder? or does it refer to phrase 'for African Americans to enter politics'?


Even when it serves as an EXPLETIVE -- also known as a placeholder pronoun -- the referent for it should still be crystal clear.
In the first sentence, the referent for it is the infinitive in blue.
Conveyed meaning:
To prevail amidst uncertainty takes great courage.
In the second sentence, the referent for it is the infinitive in green.
Conveyed meaning:
Long before to enter politics was prevalent for African Americans, Alexander Twilight became the first African American to serve in the state legislature.
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Nov 2019, 19:59
Hello Gmat NINJA,
I just have a quick question considering the use of 'as' in comparison.
AS, when used in the comparison, should be followed by a clause. And in general, AS sets off a comparison between actions. (pls correct me if I am wrong).
But I just saw a sentence, maybe in the Manhattan SC.
'As in the previous case, the judge took an early break.' [/i]->Does this usage break the general assumption of AS b/c it is followed by a prep phrase? what is being compared here in the sentence?
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar   [#permalink] 21 Nov 2019, 19:59

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