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Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative,

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Re: Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative, [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2017, 04:42
mikemcgarry wrote:
Mo2men wrote:
Hi Mike,

The article is full of tricky examples. :)

I have question about the phrase 'his contemporary Mengzi’s interpretation'. I know that 'his' refer to 'Zhuangzi' but the name itself 'Zhuangzi' is mentioned in possessive form. I mean to use 'his', it should mention Zhuangzi clearly to be a correct reference.

Do I miss something? Can you you help?

Dear Mo2men,
Great question, my friend! I am happy to help! :-)

This is a very tricky rule about pronouns and their antecedents. In general, a noun in the possessive cannot be the antecedent of a pronoun, but the exception is that an noun in the possessive can be the antecedent of a possessive pronoun.
e.g. Mozart's piano concerti are performed more frequently than his wind concerti."
That's what's going on with Zhuanghi's name in (D).

Does this make sense?

Mike :-)


Dear Mike,

I have some confusion about role mentioned above and the following:

In her birthday party, Alison served cakes and drinks

Is the above construction acceptable in GMAT? does 'her party' refer to Alison's party' correctly?

Thanks in advance

Kudos [?]: 287 [0], given: 164

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Re: Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative, [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2017, 14:13
Mo2men wrote:
Dear Mike,

I have some confusion about role mentioned above and the following:

In her birthday party, Alison served cakes and drinks

Is the above construction acceptable in GMAT? does 'her party' refer to Alison's party' correctly?

Thanks in advance

Dear Mo2men,

I'm happy to respond. How are you, my friend? :-)

Your example sentence:
In her birthday party, Alison served cakes and drinks.
In this sentence, the placement of the pronoun is not only 100% correct but quite sophisticated. This is one of the many rhetorical devices that writers use to build tension in a sentence. The reader reads "In her birthday party . . ." and immediately wonders, "who?" This curiosity can drive the reader with curiosity to read the rest of the sentence. Skilled writers don't just want to dump information on the reader: they want to create structures that produce a sort of "intellectual current" that impels the reader through their work. This is one simple example. Obviously, with story-book topic about a child's birthday party is not that intellectually enthralling, but we could imagine more dramatic academic or historical use.
Before she traveled around the world in just 72 days in 1889-1890, . . .
After he conquered China, becoming its first non-native emperor, . . .
Though his last novel has be called both a "masterpiece" and "unreadable," . . .

In all three cases, the "antecedent" of the pronoun would follow the comma, coming long after the mention of the pronoun itself. In all three cases, as I think you will agree, the unidentified pronoun generates a certain curiosity that would compel the read to read the rest of the sentence.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative, [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2017, 14:20
mikemcgarry wrote:
Mo2men wrote:
Dear Mike,

I have some confusion about role mentioned above and the following:

In her birthday party, Alison served cakes and drinks

Is the above construction acceptable in GMAT? does 'her party' refer to Alison's party' correctly?

Thanks in advance

Dear Mo2men,

I'm happy to respond. How are you, my friend? :-)

Your example sentence:
In her birthday party, Alison served cakes and drinks.
In this sentence, the placement of the pronoun is not only 100% correct but quite sophisticated. This is one of the many rhetorical devices that writers use to build tension in a sentence. The reader reads "In her birthday party . . ." and immediately wonders, "who?" This curiosity can drive the reader with curiosity to read the rest of the sentence. Skilled writers don't just want to dump information on the reader: they want to create structures that produce a sort of "intellectual current" that impels the reader through their work. This is one simple example. Obviously, with story-book topic about a child's birthday party is not that intellectually enthralling, but we could imagine more dramatic academic or historical use.
Before she traveled around the world in just 72 days in 1889-1890, . . .
After he conquered China, becoming its first non-native emperor, . . .
Though his last novel has be called both a "masterpiece" and "unreadable," . . .

In all three cases, the "antecedent" of the pronoun would follow the comma, coming long after the mention of the pronoun itself. In all three cases, as I think you will agree, the unidentified pronoun generates a certain curiosity that would compel the read to read the rest of the sentence.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)



Thanks Mike. :-)
I do share the curiosity when it is written in such a style.

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Re: Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative, [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 04:19
mikemcgarry wrote:
Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative, but in terms of a lasting impact on the course of Chinese civilization this was not as influential as the interpretation of Confucianism of Mengzi, who was his contemporary.

(A) Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative, but in terms of a lasting impact on the course of Chinese civilization this was not as influential as the interpretation of Confucianism of Mengzi, who was his contemporary

(B) Mengzi’s interpretation of Confucianism had a lasting impact on the course of Chinese civilization, whereas his contemporary Zhuangzi’s interpretation of Daoism, though highly imaginative, did not do this

(C) Zhuangzi had a highly imaginative interpretation of Daoism, but this interpretation had less of an impact on the course of Chinese civilization than his contemporary Mengzi, whose interpretation of Confucianism was more influential

(D) Zhuangzi’s interpretation of Daoism, though highly imaginative, did not have as lasting an impact on the course of Chinese civilization as had his contemporary Mengzi’s interpretation of Confucianism

(E) In terms of lasting impact, Mengzi’s interpretation of Confucianism influenced Chinese civilization more than the highly imaginative interpretation of Daoism by Mengzi’s contemporary Zhuangzi


This is a very complicated comparison SC question, the sort that the GMAT might give you. How does one approach such questions? For three more questions of this sort, as well as the OE for this question, see:
Challenging Comparison Questions on the GMAT

Mike :-)


This is very complicated; the thing about D is that is succinctly expresses the idea. The modifier in C can be done away though the way D is written may sound wrong to a native's ear.

D

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Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative, [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 13:15
(C) Zhuangzi had a highly imaginative interpretation of Daoism, but this interpretation had less of an impact on the course of Chinese civilization than his contemporary Mengzi, whose interpretation of Confucianism was more influential

Compare "people" to "this interpretation" - NOPE

(D) Zhuangzi’s interpretation of Daoism, though highly imaginative, did not have as lasting an impact on the course of Chinese civilization as had his contemporary Mengzi’s interpretation of Confucianism

Correctly compare Zhuangzi’s interpretation of Daoism to Mengzi’s interpretation of Confucianism.

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Zhuangzi had an interpretation of Daoism that was highly imaginative,   [#permalink] 28 Sep 2017, 13:15

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