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In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in

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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2017, 09:48
Thanks Ajitesh. As requested, it would help if you can cite an example where GMAT is fine with this usage. Will help me clarify this ambiguity.
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New post 11 Mar 2017, 02:36
malavika1 wrote:
Thanks Ajitesh. As requested, it would help if you can cite an example where GMAT is fine with this usage. Will help me clarify this ambiguity.
I'm not saying that the GMAT is fine with it. I'm just saying that we don't have reliable evidence to the contrary, that the GMAT is definitely not fine with it (for example, the company that made this particular question does not make questions for the GMAT anymore).
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Mar 2017, 03:18
AjiteshArun wrote:
I'm not saying that the GMAT is fine with it. I'm just saying that we don't have reliable evidence to the contrary, that the GMAT is definitely not fine with it (for example, the company that made this particular question does not make questions for the GMAT anymore).

If the standard/quality/appropriateness of GMAT questions varies with the company that "currently" makes questions for GMAT, this is really unfortunate.

Also, this is brilliant information for me Sir. So, GMAT actually "outsources" the question preparation? Wow. Which was this company and which company now makes questions for GMAT?
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2017, 03:37
malavika1 wrote:
If the standard/quality/appropriateness of GMAT questions varies with the company that "currently" makes questions for GMAT, this is really unfortunate.

Also, this is brilliant information for me Sir. So, GMAT actually "outsources" the question preparation? Wow. Which was this company and which company now makes questions for GMAT?
ETS used to make GMAT questions. Now GMAT questions are made by ACT. I actually asked some senior people at the GMAC, and they said that they stand by all GMAT questions (even the ETS questions). But in some cases we can clearly see explanations in the OG changing. I don't think that's a bad thing. Language evolves, and so too must GMAT questions.
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New post 21 Mar 2017, 10:56
Interesting. What is ACT?

I tried searching on Google and could not find any reference.
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New post 21 Mar 2017, 10:58
AjiteshArun wrote:
I'm just saying that we don't have reliable evidence to the contrary, that the GMAT is definitely not fine with it

Hello Sir, in terms of GMAT, what exactly would be considered a reliable evidence?
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2017, 15:07
In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in Virginia, stunned his family, friends, and neighbors by filing a deed of emancipa¬tion, setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered his property.
(A) setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered
(B) setting free more than the 500 slaves legally considered as
(C) and set free more than 500 slaves, who were legally considered as
(D) and set free more than the 500 slaves who were legally considered
(E) and he set free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered as


'Considered as' is unidiomatic, so we eliminate B,C and E.

In D the usage of article 'The' before the slaves means that he had more than 500 slaves and only 500 were leagally his property while the rest were illeagal.,it is change in meaning so elimiate D

A is the correct choice.
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2017, 03:25
AjiteshArun wrote:
malavika1 wrote:
Ajitesh, I have an idiom list which mentions that "consider as" is not correct.

Can you cite an example where GMAT is fine with this usage? Will help me clarify this ambiguity.
The thinking behind that particular entry in your idiom list is flawed. Consider as is standard and is very much in use, even if it is (perhaps) not as common, or as concise, as consider X Y (where X and Y are both nouns). However, it remains a stretch to say that the as will always be incorrect.

Whether this affects you or not is debatable, but what is not debatable is that the GMAT has exploited such incorrect classifications in the past by making questions in which the correct option uses a supposedly unidiomatic structure.


Hi AjiteshArun, Utkarsh from Jamboree Classes. I have a doubt, Is it correct to use 'the' before 'more than' as used in option A?
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2017, 07:29
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utkarshthapak wrote:
Hi AjiteshArun, Utkarsh from Jamboree Classes. I have a doubt, Is it correct to use 'the' before 'more than' as used in option A?
Hi Utkarsh, yes it is. Look at it this way:

The people
The 110 people (just specifying the number)
The (>100) people (maybe we don't know the exact number, or that level of precision is unnecessary)
The (more than hundred) people (putting it in words)
The more than hundred people

Here is a similar sentence from a recent NYT article:
Quote:
Employees like Dolan, who work the phones, start at $14 an hour, about a dollar less than the median wage earned by the more than 2.5 million Americans who work as customer-service representatives.

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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2017, 01:18
ugimba wrote:
349. In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in Virginia, stunned his family, friends, and neighbors by filing a deed of emancipation, setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered his property.

(A) setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered
(B) setting free more than the 500 slaves legally considered as
(C) and set free more than 500 slaves, who were legally considered as
(D) and set free more than the 500 slaves who were legally considered
(E) and he set free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered as


First of all ..."setting free ....." is a verb-ing modifier describing how Mr Carter "stunned" (verb) his family and friends..
So we need "setting free" as it is ...
Hence, option C, D and E are out..

Next, the noun here is "the more than 500 slaves" - a noun phrase..
There is a difference between "the more than 500 slaves" and "more than the 500 slaves"
First phrase means : Carter released all the slaves which were more than 500 in numbers...
Second phrase means : Carter released some more than 500 slaves - this does NOT mean he released all of them ...it may be a minor fraction of all or may be 80% of all ..etc .etc ...

Hence, option B changes the meaning of hte sentence..
Option A is correct

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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2017, 05:01
Why is considered as wrong? In this particular scenario?
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2017, 12:32
In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in Virginia, stunned his family, friends, and neighbors by filing a deed of emancipation, setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered his property.

(A) setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered -Correct
(B) setting free more than the 500 slaves legally considered as -considered as is wrong idiom
(C) and set free more than 500 slaves, who were legally considered as -not parallel; incorrect idiom
(D) and set free more than the 500 slaves who were legally considered - not parallel
(E) and he set free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered as -incorrect idiom
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2017, 12:33
Prashant10692 wrote:
Why is considered as wrong? In this particular scenario?


Hi,

Its a wrong idiom. Correct idiom is "considered" --no "as", no "to be"; just "considered".

For details refer SC book by MGMAT.

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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2019, 22:16
I did not understand the idiom usage here.
Why cannot we consider
1. X and Y structure instead of X,Y
2. filing as the -ing for stunned.
Experts please help.
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2019, 00:16

fluke wrote:
akkifreaky wrote:
"Setting Free the more than 500" ! Does not tis sound weird ? I went with option B.


"the more than 500" and "more than 500" are both syntactically correct but not semantically as the absence of article "the" changes the meaning of the sentence.

"the": tells us that he had only 500 slaves and he freed all of them.
absence of "the": tells us that he freed 500 slaves out of all slaves he owned and thus changes the meaning.

also; "considered as legally" sounds as if the slaves are still considered as his property, whereas the actual event happened way in the past.

the statement with "and" should be ignored as it makes the two acts, filing the deed and setting free, independent of each other, whereas the original sentence conveys that the first act caused the second.

"A" is most appropriate.


This one post clears so many doubts on SC!!!! Amazing
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2019, 09:33
daagh wrote:
Let’s take you have more than 500 flowers and you want to sell all of them. Then we say that you want to sell the more than 500 flowers.
In the second case, you have more than 600 or 700 flowers, but you want to sell only just more than 500 flowers, say 550 or so , retaining the others. In this case, we will say that you want to sell more than the 500 flowers.
In the given topic the in A before more stresses that he set free all his 500 and odd slaves, while D implies that he retained some. This is not the intended meaning. If he wanted emancipate slaves, why would ha have retained a few alone?


Hi, can you please explain the correct usage of "considered / considered as". Which one is correct and why?

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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2019, 08:56
daagh sir, is the usage of 'considered as' unidiomatic/redundant for this question? As you can see from what I've quoted below, what is the right approach?

Quote:
In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in Virginia, stunned his family, friends, and neighbors by filing a deed of emancipation, setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered his property.

(A) setting free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered
(B) setting free more than the 500 slaves legally considered as
(C) and set free more than 500 slaves, who were legally considered as
(D) and set free more than the 500 slaves who were legally considered
(E) and he set free the more than 500 slaves who were legally considered as



Quote:
The thinking behind that particular entry in your idiom list is flawed. Consider as is standard and is very much in use, even if it is (perhaps) not as common, or as concise, as consider X Y (where X and Y are both nouns). However, it remains a stretch to say that the as will always be incorrect.

Whether this affects you or not is debatable, but what is not debatable is that the GMAT has exploited such incorrect classifications in the past by making questions in which the correct option uses a supposedly unidiomatic structure.
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Re: In 1791 Robert Carter III, one of the wealthiest plantation owners in   [#permalink] 10 Aug 2019, 08:56

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