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In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass

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In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2018, 04:36
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A
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In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Association conference, Dr. Spagnoli distinguished pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders.


(A) pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders

(B) bipolar disorders and pronounced alterations in mood, occurring frequently and occasionally severely, without constituting a clinical illness

(C) pronounced alterations in mood, perhaps frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders

(D) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders

(E) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders

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In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2018, 05:36
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+1 for E.

(A) pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders

(B) bipolar disorders and pronounced alterations in mood, occurring frequently and occasionally severely, without constituting a clinical illness

(C) pronounced alterations in mood, perhaps frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders

(D) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders --> "Distinguish between X from Y" is unidiomatic

(E) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders --> Correct, "Distinguish between X and Y" is correct idiom, and rectifies modifier error

Hence, E.
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 04:15
sudarshan22 wrote:
+1 for E.

(A) pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders

(B) bipolar disorders and pronounced alterations in mood, occurring frequently and occasionally severely, without constituting a clinical illness

(C) pronounced alterations in mood, perhaps frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders

(D) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders --> "Distinguish between X from Y" is unidiomatic

(E) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders --> Correct, "Distinguish between X and Y" is correct idiom, and rectifies modifier error

Hence, E.



Can you please elaborate on errors in choice A?

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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 06:38
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Harshgmat wrote:
Can you please elaborate on errors in choice A?
Posted from my mobile device

Though not elaborated in details with words, I have already highlighted the error in my previous post.
"Their" in option A is ambiguous and does not have a fixed antecedent, although the sentence has a valid idiom i.e, "Distinguish X from Y".
But in our case "Distinguish between X and Y" is more legit.

Hope it helps! :thumbup:
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 06:57
sudarshan22 wrote:
Harshgmat wrote:
Can you please elaborate on errors in choice A?
Posted from my mobile device

Though not elaborated in details with words, I have already highlighted the error in my previous post.
"Their" in option A is ambiguous and does not have a fixed antecedent, although the sentence has a valid idiom i.e, "Distinguish X from Y".
But in our case "Distinguish between X and Y" is more legit.

Hope it helps! :thumbup:


I think possible antecedent for "their" is 'pronounced alterations in mood'

Is it not?
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 07:36
"Their" in option A is possessive pronoun used for alterations in mood.
so...and occasionally severe without alterations in mood's constituting a clinical illness.. sounds incorrect.
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2018, 01:40
Bunuel wrote:
In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Association conference, Dr. Spagnoli distinguished pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders.


(A) pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders

(B) bipolar disorders and pronounced alterations in mood, occurring frequently and occasionally severely, without constituting a clinical illness

(C) pronounced alterations in mood, perhaps frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders

(D) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders

(E) between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders


KAPLAN OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



Before moving to the question of expression, start with grammar. The answer choices provide you with some different idioms so let's start there. The verb distinguished needs to be followed by from unless it's followed by between, so eliminate (B) and (C). Between appears in (D) and (E) and, as you know from earlier examples, between must always be followed by and. Eliminate (D) for pairing between and from. Finally on the question of expression, (E) is superior to (A) because (A) contains an unnecessary their. (E) is the winner.
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2018, 02:47
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MY10SECAPPROACH :
Between follows distinguish as a preposition , Between comes with "and" for comparisons , only available in option E
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the annual American Psychological Ass   [#permalink] 12 Oct 2018, 02:47
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