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In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in

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In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2015, 11:32
2
25
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

41% (01:18) correct 59% (01:14) wrong based on 568 sessions

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In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in both leagues hit an average total of 370 home runs each season, more than 60% percent less than those in the 1920s.

A) less than those in the 1920s
B) less than in the 1920s
C) less than the 1920s
D) fewer than the 1920s
E) fewer than that of the seasons in the 1920s

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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2015, 23:35
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Hi,

I thought "runs" are countable... so "fewer" should be used..

I found the same question and its explanation in this link:

fewer-vs-less-180587.html

I would like people to discuss it again here though. Nice one Harley.

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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2015, 01:21
B I believe is the right answer.

Here meaning is very important. Consider this part 'MLB hitters hit an average of 370 home runs, more than 60% percent.....

It is the runs that are more or in other words, hitters hit more than 60% runs .....than (the runs scored) in the 1920s. C,D,E change the meaning and compare runs to years. A uses 'those' which is redundant. Hence, B.
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In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2015, 02:24
dominicraj wrote:
Hi,

I thought "runs" are countable... so "fewer" should be used..

I found the same question and its explanation in this link:

fewer-vs-less-180587.html

I would like people to discuss it again here though. Nice one Harley.

Regards,
Dom


Hello dominicraj
I too chose fewer but this word refers to average total not to runs, so fewer will be wrong and we need less
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2015, 02:33
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Here ‘more than 60% less than’ refers to the average total and neither to the runs nor the hitters. Since ‘a total’ is taken as a quantum and singular, using ‘less than’ is acceptable. B is the choice.
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2015, 02:48
Hi,

Actually as per the link where Magoosh has discussed this in detail, they are focusing mainly on "an average".. ie. they are going into a little too technical aspect of countable vs uncountable and how the number being decimal or integer may make the difference. :)

Nevertheless, Is " total" not countable?.. IMO total shows that the number is "limited to". What is your opinion?

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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2015, 02:54
Total is always a single number. You cannot have several totals for a given addition or subtraction; So it is non-countable
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2015, 01:59
egmat,

can you pls help to explain why option b is correct?

IMO, we are comparing 'the total of the runs in 1900-1919' to 'the total of the runs in 1920s' and thus, we need a pronoun here, such as that ?

thanks
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2017, 08:37
justdoitxxxxx wrote:
egmat,

can you pls help to explain why option b is correct?

IMO, we are comparing 'the total of the runs in 1900-1919' to 'the total of the runs in 1920s' and thus, we need a pronoun here, such as that ?

thanks


We have 1920's in the answer choice. Had the option be 1920, then we need that
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2018, 23:34
WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHAT DOES THOSE REFERS TO IN OPTION A?
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2018, 01:41
1
Harley1980 wrote:
In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in both leagues hit an average total of 370 home runs each season, more than 60% percent less than those in the 1920s.

A) less than those in the 1920s
B) less than in the 1920s
C) less than the 1920s
D) fewer than the 1920s
E) fewer than that of the seasons in the 1920s


great question, this is gmat like and very hard and basic.

look at choice A , a big trap.
at first we see that "those " refers to "hitter" and the sentence look good
look at
in 1900s, Major hitter hit 370 runs, less than those do in 1920.
this is correct sentence because "those hitter " refer the previous hitter and "do" refer to "hit".
we can cut off the element which are the same in two parts of comparisons. we can cut off both the same elements.
and the sentence become
in 1990, Major hitter hit 370 run less than in 1920. this is choice B. correct.
look at choice A.
less than those in 1920.
why here only "do" is cut off. why "those" is not cut off. this is one inconsistent thing.
the second error is
"those in 1920" dose not make paralel pattern which is required in comparison. in the first part of comparison, we do not have "hitter in 1900", so, we can not logically have "those in 1920". because this choice cut off only one of two the same element in the second part, it make an unparallel pattern. if both 2 the same elements are cut off in the second part, we have a paralel pattern.

choice A is particularly tricky for us. by analysing carefully , we can avoid choice A next time.

the takeaway is
- cut off both the similar elements, not only one to keep sentence parallel.
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2018, 01:54
this sentence is great. I am sure, there are similar problems in og books.

the nature of making ellipsis pattern is that the similar elements in the second part of comparison must be cut off. we can not cut off one of two similar elements. WHY WE CUT OFF JUST ONE OF TWO SIMILAR ELEMENTS. this is not logic and this is a problem for comparison. we can use pronoun and do/did to refer back to previous elements.
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Re: In the "dead-ball" era of 1900-1919, Major League Baseball hitters in  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2018, 16:12
2

OE Magoosh:



Split #1: this is a very tricky "less"/"fewer" split. If we were comparing individual totals of homeruns, something we could count for each person, then we would be comparing something countable, and we would have to used fewer (e.g. "Ted Williams hit fewer homeruns than Reggie Jackson.") Here, though, we are talking about comparing the "average total" --- the average of several seasons is not guaranteed to be a whole number: it could be a decimal. Therefore, we aren't really counting whole things anymore, so we don't used "fewer" (used only for countable nouns), and instead, we use "less." Choices (A) & (B) & (C) have this correct.

Split #2: the comparison. First of all, we don't want to compare the average HR total in the dead ball era to the decade of the 1920s. We need to compare average to average. The phrasing in (C) & (D), "than the 1920s", means we are comparing something to the entire decade of the 1920's ---- this is not what the sentence means. Choices (C) & (D) are incorrect. We are trying to compare the average HR total in the dead ball era to the average HR total in the 1920s. It would be correct to say "than that in the 1920s", because the singular pronoun "that" would be referring the average HR total. BUT, the plural pronoun "those" is not correct: (A) makes this mistake. Only choice (B) correctly drops all the common words ("Major League Baseball hitters in both leagues hit an average total of home runs each season") and economically states just the key words that make the difference: "in the 1920s." This is a remarkably elegant and sophisticated way to convey this comparison, and it is 100% correct. (B) is the only possible answer.
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