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John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December

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John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2017, 09:50
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75% (01:49) correct 25% (02:07) wrong based on 113 sessions

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John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December 8, 1128, of two unusually large sunspots. Five days later a brilliant aurora borealis (northern lights) was observed in southern Korea. Sunspot activity is typically followed by the appearance of an aurora borealis, after a span of time that averages five days. Thus, the Korean sighting helps to confirm John of Worcester' s sighting.

Which one of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

(A) An aurora borealis can sometimes occur even when there has been no significant sunspot activity in the previous week.
(B) Chinese sources recorded the sighting of sunspots more than 1000 years before John of Worcester did.
(C) Only heavy sunspot activity could have resulted in an aurora borealis viewable at a latitude as low as that of Korea.
(D) Because it is impossible to view sunspots with the naked eye under typical daylight conditions, the sighting recorded by John of Worcester would have taken place under unusual weather conditions such as fog or thin clouds.
(E) John of Worcester's account included a drawing of the sunspots, which could be the earliest illustration of sunspot activity.

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John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2017, 15:07
Akela wrote:
John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December 8, 1128, of two unusually large sunspots. Five days later a brilliant aurora borealis (northern lights) was observed in southern Korea. Sunspot activity is typically followed by the appearance of an aurora borealis, after a span of time that averages five days. Thus, the Korean sighting helps to confirm John of Worcester' s sighting.

Which one of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

(A) An aurora borealis can sometimes occur even when there has been no significant sunspot activity in the previous week.
(B) Chinese sources recorded the sighting of sunspots more than 1000 years before John of Worcester did.
(C) Only heavy sunspot activity could have resulted in an aurora borealis viewable at a latitude as low as that of Korea.
(D) Because it is impossible to view sunspots with the naked eye under typical daylight conditions, the sighting recorded by John of Worcester would have taken place under unusual weather conditions such as fog or thin clouds.
(E) John of Worcester's account included a drawing of the sunspots, which could be the earliest illustration of sunspot activity.

LSAT


One way to solve this question is to think what could strengthen it: the argument is that one sighting strengthens the conclusion drawn form the other, since they are usually correlated. Thus, something telling us that this correlation is robust, frequent or even necessary would greatly strengthen it. This exactly what C tells us.

Another way to solve it is by going over the answers:
A - weakens the argument: it suggests the correlation between aurora and sunspots may be meaningless
B - irrelevant
C - Exactly what we need: by saying that only sunspot activity could lead to this result, this not only strengthens but actually means the sighting is definitely correct.
D - This weakens the argument, since it suggests the sighting was made under problematic conditions, in which there would have been interference.
E - irrelevant.
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Re: John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2017, 16:04
To strengthen the argument we need something that shows the Korean sighting helps to confirm John of Worcester' s sighting.

Answer C. Only heavy sunspot activity could have resulted in an aurora borealis viewable at a latitude as low as that of Korea
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Re: John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December &nbs [#permalink] 25 Dec 2017, 16:04
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John of Worcester, an English monk, recorded the sighting, on December

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