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Magoosh practice question -- Gen.Joseph Hooker

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Joined: 17 Sep 2016
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Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 30

Magoosh practice question -- Gen.Joseph Hooker [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2017, 00:48
Hi mikemcgarry

Here is a question from Magoosh practice, would you please introduce more usage of "WOULD"

Gen. Joseph Hooker initially seized the advantage at the Battle of Chancellorsville, but despite having an army twice the size of Gen. Lee's confederates, he lost his nerve and settled into a more defensive posture, with the result that his army would suffer a humiliating defeat.   

A) with the result that his army would suffer

B) eventually with his army suffering

C) and as a result, his army eventually would suffer

D) his army eventually suffering

E) which eventually caused his army to suffer


I don't understand the usage of "WOULD" in answer A and C is correct, as I know, "WOULD" can be used
#1 as past tense of "will"
Eg: She said she would finish the task.

#2 to describe the low possibility in conditionals
Eg: If I had worked harder, I would have passed the exam

I think "WOULD" is used neither of two above,
Did I miss something, please introduce/clarify

Thanks in advance
have a nice day

Zoe
>_~

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 30

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Re: Magoosh practice question -- Gen.Joseph Hooker [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2017, 13:37
zoezhuyan wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry

Here is a question from Magoosh practice, would you please introduce more usage of "WOULD"

Gen. Joseph Hooker initially seized the advantage at the Battle of Chancellorsville, but despite having an army twice the size of Gen. Lee's confederates, he lost his nerve and settled into a more defensive posture, with the result that his army would suffer a humiliating defeat.   

A) with the result that his army would suffer

B) eventually with his army suffering

C) and as a result, his army eventually would suffer

D) his army eventually suffering

E) which eventually caused his army to suffer


I don't understand the usage of "WOULD" in answer A and C is correct, as I know, "WOULD" can be used
#1 as past tense of "will"
Eg: She said she would finish the task.

#2 to describe the low possibility in conditionals
Eg: If I had worked harder, I would have passed the exam

I think "WOULD" is used neither of two above,
Did I miss something, please introduce/clarify

Thanks in advance
have a nice day

Zoe
>_~

Dear zoezhuyan,

How are you, my friend? :-) I'm happy to help you. :-)

My friend, I may have said this to you before, but there are two basic approaches to GMAT Verbal, especially SC.
Approach #1 = rule-based (learn all the rules of grammar and apply those rules)
Approach #2 = develop intuition derived from extensive experience
Approach #1 appears shorter and many non-native speakers try to pursue #1 and avoid #2. The problem is that Approach #1 will NEVER result in GMAT SC mastery. In fact, students naively think that the GMAT SC tests grammar, but that is short-sighted. The GMAT SC tests the way that grammar and logic and rhetoric all come together to produce meaning: it's about all of that, not just about grammar in isolation.
Approach #2 is much longer, involving much more time and energy and focus, but this is ultimately the best way to arrive at a high performance in GMAT Verbal. See:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score
Developing a consistent habit of reading and challenging yourself each and every day to read high-level English material from topics that are not familiar to you will be the best way to develop intuition over time.

In this particular instance, you understand the rule itself perfectly, but you don't have enough of a "feel" for the language to realize that you are not applying the rule correctly.

Let's look at (C), the OA:
Gen. Joseph Hooker initially seized the advantage at the Battle of Chancellorsville, but despite having an army twice the size of Gen. Lee's confederates, he lost his nerve and settled into a more defensive posture, and as a result, his army eventually would suffer a humiliating defeat

This is a correct use of rule #1, the past tense of "will." The focus of the sentence is what we might call the "set-up" or initial phases of the Battle of Chancellorsville. (BTW, that entire Wikipedia article would be an excellent example of something you could read for practice!!) The time period on which the sentence focuses is the beginning of this battle, so from that perspective, the end of the battle would be something in the future. If a "fortune teller" had met Gen. Hooker at the beginning of the battle, this fortune teller might have told him "Your army will suffer a humiliating defeat." From that particular time, the defeat would have been in the future. Since the time on which the sentence is focused is in the past, the future of that past event, which is now another past event, is denoted with "would."

Does all this make sense?

Take care, my friend!
Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Kudos [?]: 8784 [0], given: 106

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Joined: 17 Sep 2016
Posts: 199

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 30

Re: Magoosh practice question -- Gen.Joseph Hooker [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2017, 19:57
thanks so much Mike

I think what I missed.

Yes, my feeling is not enough to get high score, anyway, I will keep reading The Economist as your suggestion

have a nice day

Zoe
>_~

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 30

Re: Magoosh practice question -- Gen.Joseph Hooker   [#permalink] 12 Oct 2017, 19:57
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Magoosh practice question -- Gen.Joseph Hooker

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