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SC : Confusable words

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SC : Confusable words [#permalink]

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Hello GMAT takers!!!

I have come across the below confusable words in my GMAT verbal preparation so far. I would like to share the same with you guys. I will keep on updating the list. Please feel free to add/update further. :cool:

1) ACCEDE/EXCEED
The word exceed comes from the Latin word “excedere,” which means to go out, go forth, go beyond a certain limit, overpass, exceed, transgress.
e.g. If you drive too fast, you exceed the speed limit.

The word accede comes from the Latin word “accedo”, which means to approach. It means "give in," "agree."
e.g. Do not accede too readily to his demands or he will think you are a wimp!

2) ADAPT/ADEPT/ADOPT
ADAPT-make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose
ADOPT- choose and follow; as of theories, ideas, policies, strategies or plans; to take on
ADEPT- very skilled or proficient at something.

3) ADVERSE/AVERSE
ADVERSE- adverse is something harmful,
AVERSE- averse is a strong feeling of dislike

4) ADVICE/ADVISE
ADVICE- it is a noun form.
ADVISE - it is verb form.

5) AESTHETIC/ASCETIC
AESTHETIC- "Aesthetic" (also spelled "esthetic") has to do with beauty.
AESTHETIC- ascetic" has to do with avoiding pleasure, including presumably the pleasure of looking at beautiful things.

6) AFFECT/EFFECT
AFFECT - Affect is chiefly used as a verb and its main meaning is ‘to influence or make a difference to.
e.g.The pay increase will greatly affect their lifestyle.

EFFECT - Effect, on the other hand, is used both as a noun and a verb, although is more commonly used as a noun. As a noun it means ‘a result or an influence’. Move the cursor until you get the effect you want.

When used as a verb effect means ‘to bring something about as a result’. It’s most often used in a formal context as oppose to everyday English: e.g. Growth in the economy can only be effected by stringent economic controls.

7) AFFLUENCE/EFFLUENCE
AFFLUENCE: Wealth brings affluence;
EFFLUENCE: sewage is effluence.

8) ALLITERATE/ILLITERATE
ALLITERATE - Pairs of words with the same initial sound alliterate, like "wild and wooly."
ILLITERATE- Those who can't read are illiterate.

9) ALLUDE/ELUDE
ALLUDE is to suggest or indirectly call attention to something, for example:
She had a way of alluding to Jean but never saying her name.

ELUDE means to escape from or avoid someone or something, for example:
The thief eluded the authorities for months.

Or the failure to achieve or attain something, for example:
After three years, the cup still eluded them.

10) ALLUSION/ILLUSION
ALLUSION is a reference, direct or implied, to something or someone. Allusions are often found in books, songs, TV shows, and movies. For instance, the title of Aldous Huxley’s classic novel Brave New World is an allusion to a work by William Shakespeare.

ILLUSION, on the other hand, is something that deceives the mind or senses by creating a false impression of reality. Illusions are often (though not always) related to visual perception, as in optical illusion. A mirage, such as a phenomenon of perceiving a sea of water in a desert, is a type of illusion.

If you feel this post is useful, appreciate it ...
I will keep on adding new words to the list...
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Re: SC : Confusable words [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2017, 23:29
Really good
Keep up !
Thanks

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Re: SC : Confusable words [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2017, 04:18
In gmatclub.com, we have a unique method to appreciate someone's work... :cool:
Please provide Kudos by clicking on +1 kudo button :thumbup: on bottom of post... :angel:
Yanick wrote:
Really good
Keep up !
Thanks

Sent from my SM-N915F using GMAT Club Forum mobile app

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Re: SC : Confusable words [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2017, 08:30
Confusable words : Part 2

11) ANXIOUS/EAGER

Most people use "anxious" interchangeably with "eager," but its original meaning had to do
with worrying, being full of anxiety. Perfectly correct phrases like, "anxious to please"
obscure the nervous tension implicit in this word and lead people to say less correct things
like "I'm anxious for Christmas morning to come so I can open my presents." Traditionalists
frown on anxiety-free anxiousness. Say instead you are eager for or looking forward to a
happy event.

12) APPRAISE/APPRISE
When you estimate the value of something, you appraise it. When you inform people of a
situation, you apprise them of it.

13)ASOCIAL/ANTISOCIAL
Someone who doesn't enjoy socializing at parties might be described as either "asocial" or
"antisocial"; but "asocial" is too mild a term to describe someone who commits an antisocial
act like planting a bomb. "Asocial" suggests indifference to or separation from society,
whereas "anti-social" more often suggests active hostility toward society.

14)ASSURE/ENSURE/INSURE
To "assure" a person of something is to make him or her confident of it. According to
Associated Press style, to "ensure" that something happens is to make certain that it does,
and to "insure" is to issue an insurance policy. Other authorities, however, consider "ensure"
and "insure" interchangeable. To please conservatives, make the distinction. However, it is
worth noting that in older usage these spellings were not clearly distinguished.
European "life assurance" companies take the position that all policy-holders are mortal and
someone will definitely collect, thus assuring heirs of some income. American companies
tend to go with "insurance" for coverage of life as well as of fire, theft, etc.

15)AURAL/ORAL
"Aural" has to do with things you hear, "oral" with things you say, or relating to your mouth.

16)AVENGE/REVENGE
When you try to get vengeance for people who've been wronged, you want to avenge them.
You can also avenge a wrong itself: "He avenged the murder by taking vengeance on the
killer." Substituting "revenge" for "avenge" in such contexts is very common, but frowned on
by some people. They feel that if you seek revenge in the pursuit of justice you want to
avenge wrongs; not revenge them.

17)AVOCATION/VOCATION
Your avocation is just your hobby; don't mix it up with your job: your vocation.

18)AWHILE/A WHILE
When "awhile" is spelled as a single word, it is an adverb meaning "for a time" ("stay awhile");
but when "while" is the object of a prepositional phrase, like "Lend me your monkey wrench
for a while" the "while" must be separated from the "a." (But if the preposition "for" were
lacking in this sentence, "awhile" could be used in this way: "Lend me your monkey wrench
awhile.")

19)BACKWARD/BACKWARDS
As an adverb, either word will do: "put the shirt on backward" or "put the shirt on
backwards." However, as an adjective, only "backward" will do: "a backward glance." When
in doubt, use "backward."

20)BEMUSE/AMUSE
When you bemuse someone, you confuse them, and not necessarily in an entertaining way.
Don't confuse this word with "amuse."

Appreciate my post by giving Kudos :thumbup: ...
gmatbusters wrote:
Hello GMAT takers!!!

I have come across the below confusable words in my GMAT verbal preparation so far. I would like to share the same with you guys. I will keep on updating the list. Please feel free to add/update further. :cool:

1) ACCEDE/EXCEED
The word exceed comes from the Latin word “excedere,” which means to go out, go forth, go beyond a certain limit, overpass, exceed, transgress.
e.g. If you drive too fast, you exceed the speed limit.

The word accede comes from the Latin word “accedo”, which means to approach. It means "give in," "agree."
e.g. Do not accede too readily to his demands or he will think you are a wimp!

2) ADAPT/ADEPT/ADOPT
ADAPT-make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose
ADOPT- choose and follow; as of theories, ideas, policies, strategies or plans; to take on
ADEPT- very skilled or proficient at something.

3) ADVERSE/AVERSE
ADVERSE- adverse is something harmful,
AVERSE- averse is a strong feeling of dislike

4) ADVICE/ADVISE
ADVICE- it is a noun form.
ADVISE - it is verb form.

5) AESTHETIC/ASCETIC
AESTHETIC- "Aesthetic" (also spelled "esthetic") has to do with beauty.
AESTHETIC- ascetic" has to do with avoiding pleasure, including presumably the pleasure of looking at beautiful things.

6) AFFECT/EFFECT
AFFECT - Affect is chiefly used as a verb and its main meaning is ‘to influence or make a difference to.
e.g.The pay increase will greatly affect their lifestyle.

EFFECT - Effect, on the other hand, is used both as a noun and a verb, although is more commonly used as a noun. As a noun it means ‘a result or an influence’. Move the cursor until you get the effect you want.

When used as a verb effect means ‘to bring something about as a result’. It’s most often used in a formal context as oppose to everyday English: e.g. Growth in the economy can only be effected by stringent economic controls.

7) AFFLUENCE/EFFLUENCE
AFFLUENCE: Wealth brings affluence;
EFFLUENCE: sewage is effluence.

8) ALLITERATE/ILLITERATE
ALLITERATE - Pairs of words with the same initial sound alliterate, like "wild and wooly."
ILLITERATE- Those who can't read are illiterate.

9) ALLUDE/ELUDE
ALLUDE is to suggest or indirectly call attention to something, for example:
She had a way of alluding to Jean but never saying her name.

ELUDE means to escape from or avoid someone or something, for example:
The thief eluded the authorities for months.

Or the failure to achieve or attain something, for example:
After three years, the cup still eluded them.

10) ALLUSION/ILLUSION
ALLUSION is a reference, direct or implied, to something or someone. Allusions are often found in books, songs, TV shows, and movies. For instance, the title of Aldous Huxley’s classic novel Brave New World is an allusion to a work by William Shakespeare.

ILLUSION, on the other hand, is something that deceives the mind or senses by creating a false impression of reality. Illusions are often (though not always) related to visual perception, as in optical illusion. A mirage, such as a phenomenon of perceiving a sea of water in a desert, is a type of illusion.

If you feel this post is useful, appreciate it ...
I will keep on adding new words to the list...

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Re: SC : Confusable words [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2017, 21:23
gmatbusters wrote:
Hello GMAT takers!!!

I have come across the below confusable words in my GMAT verbal preparation so far. I would like to share the same with you guys. I will keep on updating the list. Please feel free to add/update further. :cool:

1) ACCEDE/EXCEED
The word exceed comes from the Latin word “excedere,” which means to go out, go forth, go beyond a certain limit, overpass, exceed, transgress.
e.g. If you drive too fast, you exceed the speed limit.

The word accede comes from the Latin word “accedo”, which means to approach. It means "give in," "agree."
e.g. Do not accede too readily to his demands or he will think you are a wimp!

2) ADAPT/ADEPT/ADOPT
ADAPT-make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose
ADOPT- choose and follow; as of theories, ideas, policies, strategies or plans; to take on
ADEPT- very skilled or proficient at something.

3) ADVERSE/AVERSE
ADVERSE- adverse is something harmful,
AVERSE- averse is a strong feeling of dislike

4) ADVICE/ADVISE
ADVICE- it is a noun form.
ADVISE - it is verb form.

5) AESTHETIC/ASCETIC
AESTHETIC- "Aesthetic" (also spelled "esthetic") has to do with beauty.
AESTHETIC- ascetic" has to do with avoiding pleasure, including presumably the pleasure of looking at beautiful things.

6) AFFECT/EFFECT
AFFECT - Affect is chiefly used as a verb and its main meaning is ‘to influence or make a difference to.
e.g.The pay increase will greatly affect their lifestyle.

EFFECT - Effect, on the other hand, is used both as a noun and a verb, although is more commonly used as a noun. As a noun it means ‘a result or an influence’. Move the cursor until you get the effect you want.

When used as a verb effect means ‘to bring something about as a result’. It’s most often used in a formal context as oppose to everyday English: e.g. Growth in the economy can only be effected by stringent economic controls.

7) AFFLUENCE/EFFLUENCE
AFFLUENCE: Wealth brings affluence;
EFFLUENCE: sewage is effluence.

8) ALLITERATE/ILLITERATE
ALLITERATE - Pairs of words with the same initial sound alliterate, like "wild and wooly."
ILLITERATE- Those who can't read are illiterate.

9) ALLUDE/ELUDE
ALLUDE is to suggest or indirectly call attention to something, for example:
She had a way of alluding to Jean but never saying her name.

ELUDE means to escape from or avoid someone or something, for example:
The thief eluded the authorities for months.

Or the failure to achieve or attain something, for example:
After three years, the cup still eluded them.

10) ALLUSION/ILLUSION
ALLUSION is a reference, direct or implied, to something or someone. Allusions are often found in books, songs, TV shows, and movies. For instance, the title of Aldous Huxley’s classic novel Brave New World is an allusion to a work by William Shakespeare.

ILLUSION, on the other hand, is something that deceives the mind or senses by creating a false impression of reality. Illusions are often (though not always) related to visual perception, as in optical illusion. A mirage, such as a phenomenon of perceiving a sea of water in a desert, is a type of illusion.

If you feel this post is useful, appreciate it ...
I will keep on adding new words to the list...




Good post ?
Please keep sharing such observations, which ease our prep process.

Posted from my mobile device

Posted from my mobile device
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Re: SC : Confusable words [#permalink]

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New post 14 Dec 2017, 05:36
SC - Confusable words Part-3

21) BENEFACTOR/BENEFICIARY

Benefactors give benefits; beneficiaries receive them. We expect to hear of generous
benefactors and grateful beneficiaries.

22) BESIDE/BESIDES
"Besides" can mean "in addition to" as in "besides the puppy chow, Spot scarfed up the filet
mignon I was going to serve for dinner." "Beside," in contrast, usually means "next to." "I sat
beside Cheryl all evening, but she kept talking to Jerry instead." Using "beside" for "besides,"
won't usually get you in trouble; but using "besides" when you mean "next to" will.

23) COMPLEMENT/COMPLIMENT
"compliment": nice things said about someone ("She paid me the compliment of admiring
the way I shined my shoes."). "Complement," much less common, has a number of meanings
associated with matching or completing. Complements supplement each other, each adding
something the others lack, so we can say that "Alice's love for entertaining and Mike's love
for washing dishes complement each other." Remember, if you're not making nice to
someone, the word is "complement."

24) CONSCIENCE, CONSCIOUS, CONSCIOUSNESS
Your conscience makes you feel guilty when you do bad things, but your consciousness is
your awareness. If you are awake, you are conscious. Although it is possible to speak of your
"conscious mind," you can't use "conscious" all by itself to mean "consciousness."

25) COUNCIL/COUNSEL/CONSUL
The first two words are pronounced the same but have distinct meanings. An official group
that deliberates, like the Council on Foreign Relations, is a "council"; all the rest are
"counsels": your lawyer, advice, etc. A consul is a local representative of a foreign
government.

26) CREDIBLE/CREDULOUS
"Credible" means "believable" or "trustworthy." It is also used in a more abstract sense,
meaning something like "worthy": "She made a credible lyric soprano." Don't confuse
"credible" with "credulous," a much rarer word which means "gullible." "He was
incredulous" means "he didn't believe it" whereas "he was incredible" means "he was
wonderful" (but use the latter expression only in casual speech).

27) CREVICE/CREVASSE
Crevices are by definition tiny, like that little crevice between your teeth where the popcorn
hulls always get caught. A huge crack in a glacier is given the French spelling: crevasse.

28) CURRANT/CURRENT
"Current" is an adjective having to do with the present time, and can also be a noun naming
a thing that, like time, flows: electrical current, currents of public opinion. "Currant" refers
only to little fruits.

29) DEFUSE/DIFFUSE
You defuse a dangerous situation by treating it like a bomb and removing its fuse; to diffuse,
in contrast, is to spread something out: "Bob's cheap cologne diffused throughout the room,
wrecking the wine-tasting."

30) DEPRECIATE/DEPRECATE
To depreciate something is to actually make it worse, whereas to deprecate something is
simply to speak or think of it in a manner that demonstrates your low opinion of it. People
who make unflattering jokes or comments about themselves are self-deprecating.
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Re: SC : Confusable words [#permalink]

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New post 15 Dec 2017, 18:20
SC - Confusable words Part-4

31) DEVICE/DEVISE
"Device" is a noun. A can-opener is a device. "Devise" is a verb. You can devise a plan for
opening a can with a sharp rock instead. Only in law is "devise" properly used as a noun,
meaning something deeded in a will.

32) DIFFER/VARY
"Vary" can mean "differ," but saying "our opinions vary" makes it sound as if they were
changing all the time when what you really mean is "our opinions differ." Pay attention to
context when choosing one of these words.

33) DISSEMBLE/DISASSEMBLE
People who dissemble are being dishonest, trying to hide what they are really up to. This is
an uncommon word, often misused when "disassemble" is meant. People who disassemble
something take it apart--they are doing the opposite of assembling it.

34) EMIGRATE/IMMIGRATE
To "emigrate" is to leave a country. The E at the beginning of the word is related to the E in
other words having to do with going out, such as "exit." "Immigrate," in contrast, looks as if it
might have something to do with going in, and indeed it does: it means to move into a new
country. The same distinction applies to "emigration" and "immigration." Note the double M
in the second form. A migrant is someone who continually moves about.

35) EMINENT/IMMINENT/IMMANENT
By far the most common of these words is "eminent," meaning "prominent, famous."
"Imminent," in phrases like "facing imminent disaster," means "threatening." It comes from
Latin minere, meaning "to project or overhang." Think of a mine threatening to cave in.
Positive events can also be imminent: they just need to be coming soon. The rarest of the
three is "immanent," used by philosophers to mean "inherent" and by theologians to mean
"present throughout the universe" when referring to God. It comes from Latin "manere,"
"remain." Think of God creating "man" in his own image.
When a government exercises its power over private property it is drawing on its eminent
status in society, so the proper legal phrase is "eminent domain."
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Re: SC : Confusable words   [#permalink] 15 Dec 2017, 18:20
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