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The modern multinational corporation is described as having

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Re: The modern multinational corporation is described as having [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2017, 22:30
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adkikani wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
Here, the author says --- scholars studying the the origins of modern multinationals usually start with the period when "when the owner-managers of nineteenth-century British firms carrying on international trade were replaced by teams of salaried managers organized into hierarchies." That's a perfectly sensible and appropriate thing to study, but the author is saying --- they would understand a little bit better if they also paid some attention to the early chartered trading companies. That not at all the same as saying they are "quite mistaken." This is OUT.

I can not infer this from passage at all. In the first paragraph the complete facts are stated by author and no where scholars are mentioned. I did read your comment - Again, if the passage is about an academic topic, as many many RC passages are, then don't be the least bit surprised if the word "scholar" or "professor" or similar words don't appear in the passage but do appear in the answer choices.
but then how did you infer from passage the distinction between narrator - author / scholars?


Hi adkikani! Carolyn from Magoosh here - I'll step in for Mike :-)

First, let's talk about the mention of "scholars". Here are a few excerpts from the text:

The modern multinational corporation is described as having originated when the owner-managers of nineteenth-century British firms carrying on international trade were replaced by teams of salaried managers organized into hierarchies.

Sixteenth- and seventeenth century chartered trading companies, despite the international scope of their activities,
are usually considered irrelevant to this discussion

Despite these differences, however, early trading companies organized effectively in remarkably modern ways and
merit further study as analogues of more modern structures.

Most of the passage here is written in a passive tense, like the first two sentences here, which we can see from the verbs "is described..." and "are usually considered...", and the last sentence talks about further studying this concept. The passage voice here shows that the narrator is simply describing research or information that has been collected by others (not him- or herself), implying that other people, most likely scholars of some sort, are or were studying these ideas. Also, whenever we have historical passages like this, we have to assume that the information was collected by someone - and that someone is pretty much always going to be a scholar of some sort :-) So whenever we see an academic text, "scholars", generally referring to the people who study the topic or compiled the information, are directly implied. The narrator here is likely also a scholar of some sort, but that doesn't change our interpretation :-) We can distinguish between the narrator's perspective and the general view of other scholars by the tense that is used. So again, anything in passive tense ("is described", "are typically considered") reflects the perspective of other scholars. In those cases, the narrator is simply describing the typical view held by others (scholars). Anything that's in a more active tense ("did differ strikingly", "depended") is probably information that the narrator is adding in, reflecting his or her own viewpoint.

So now let's think about the whole passage in that context :-) The first paragraph is setting the scene - it's pretty much completely written in passive voice, talking about things that are "commonly believed" or "usually considered irrelevant" (again, by scholars). After that, we start seeing the narrator's personal view: "In reality...". So this passage is setting up a contrast between what scholars typically believe and what the narrator believes. One of those differences is the view of how modern multinationals originated. Again, the author says:

The modern multinational corporation is described as having originated when the owner-managers of nineteenth-century British firms carrying on international trade were replaced by teams of salaried managers organized into hierarchies.

Here we see passive voice, indicating the view of "scholars", rather than the narrator's personal view.

adkikani wrote:
Also usually I see words like evaluate, discuss, criticize as first starting word in POE for main point Qs, whereas here all POE and solutions seem to approach this Q as an inference since POE are facts. Am I correct?


Awesome catch :-) Words like "evaluate", "discuss", and "criticize" are very commonly used in the answer choices for questions that ask about the main or primary purpose of a passage. However, "main point" isn't quite the same thing. A point can also be interpreted as the main thing that the author is trying to say. So when we're asked about the main point, we want to ask ourselves, "What is the main thing that the author is trying to get across here?" Whereas when we're asked about the main purpose of a passage, we ask "Why is the author writing this?" While these are very related, they're not quite identical. In the case of a primary purpose question, the answer choices will typically be verbs, like "evaluate", "discuss", etc.. But when we're asked for the main point, the answer choices will look more like pieces of information - what is the main piece of information that the author is trying to convey? So again, there is a subtle difference :-)

I hope that helps clear things up here! :-)
-Carolyn
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Re: The modern multinational corporation is described as having [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2017, 03:04
MagooshExpert mikemcgarry GMATNinja

Quote:
Awesome catch :-) Words like "evaluate", "discuss", and "criticize" are very commonly used in the answer choices for questions that ask about the main or primary purpose of a passage. However, "main point" isn't quite the same thing. A point can also be interpreted as the main thing that the author is trying to say. So when we're asked about the main point, we want to ask ourselves, "What is the main thing that the author is trying to get across here?" Whereas when we're asked about the main purpose of a passage, we ask "Why is the author writing this?" While these are very related, they're not quite identical. In the case of a primary purpose question, the answer choices will typically be verbs, like "evaluate", "discuss", etc.. But when we're asked for the main point, the answer choices will look more like pieces of information - what is the main piece of information that the author is trying to convey? So again, there is a subtle difference :-)


I wanted to ask a bit different question for this part. What I meant was-
while reading Expert's approach or even on GmatPrep solutions, I meant that for this main purpose question,
we approached as if we are trying to infer something from the passage (must be true).
As per me main point of RC is much like conclusion for CR but MUST BE TRUE statements that
follow from argument / passage in CR/RC are almost identical which are better knows as inferences.

Let me know if I made my query more clear.
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Re: The modern multinational corporation is described as having [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2017, 19:23
adkikani wrote:
MagooshExpert
I wanted to ask a bit different question for this part. What I meant was-
while reading Expert's approach or even on GmatPrep solutions, I meant that for this main purpose question,
we approached as if we are trying to infer something from the passage (must be true).
As per me main point of RC is much like conclusion for CR but MUST BE TRUE statements that
follow from argument / passage in CR/RC are almost identical which are better knows as inferences.

Let me know if I made my query more clear.


Hi adkikani,

I'd like to help, but I'm not sure if I completely understand your question still! The differences between "conclusion" questions and "inference" questions are sometimes very small and very subtle. I think that's the case here - this "main point" question isn't 100% a "conclusion"-type question, but it also isn't 100% an "inference"-type question - it's something in between. But we can and should use strategies from both of those question types to answer "main point" questions like this one :-) We just can't necessarily categorize them into one "type" or another.

Does that help at all? If not, let me know :-)
-Carolyn
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The modern multinational corporation is described as having [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2018, 12:44
Took 8 mins to answer and 4 mins just to read the Passage.

adkikani Main point is not inference. It is something that author wants to convey to you. It is the heart of the passage. More importantly it is in line with the tone that author uses in the passage.

Inference could be something that has been mentioned in the passage and not of outmost importance but true.
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The modern multinational corporation is described as having   [#permalink] 04 Jan 2018, 12:44

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