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The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp

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The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.


(A) doubling the increase of

(B) doubling that of the increase in

(C) double as much as the increase of

(D) twice as many as the increase in

(E) twice as many as the increase of


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Originally posted by bigoyal on 14 Jul 2009, 09:25.
Last edited by Bunuel on 24 Jan 2019, 05:01, edited 6 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2012, 08:09
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Hi All,

The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

Let’s first understand the meaning of this sentence. The year 1990 experienced a sharp rise in the number of people flying first class on domestic flights. This rise doubled the increase seen previous year.

Error Analysis:

This sentence uses verb-ing modifier “doubling” preceded by a comma. This means that this modifier will modify the entire preceding clause. Usage of “doubling” is correct here because it correctly presents the result of the preceding clause. There was a rise sharp in the number of specific passengers. This rise doubled the increased witnessed the previous year. Hence there is no error in this sentence.

POE:

a. doubling the increase of: Correct for the reason stated above.

b. doubling that of the increase in: Incorrect.
1. There is no antecedent of pronoun “that”.
2. When we say “increase in something”, the phrase means that “something” has increased itself. Hence, this phrase does not make sense in this choice as it suggests that “the previous year” increased itself.

c. double as much as the increase of: Incorrect.
1. Here “double”, a noun modifier has no particular noun to refer to.
2. The correct way to say is “double the increase” and not “double as much as the increase…”.

d. twice as many as the increase in: Inocrrect.
1. Noun modifier “twice” dos not have a noun to refer to.
2. Use of “many” for uncountable noun “increase” is incorrect.
3. Repeats the idiom error of choice B.

e. twice as many as the increase of: Incorrect. This choice repeats the first two errors of Choice D.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2009, 09:32
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bigoyal wrote:
The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

A. doubling the increase of
B. doubling that of the increase in
C. double as much as the increase of
D. twice as many as the increase in
E. twice as many as the increase of


A sounds right to me. "the number of people" is singular so that makes C, D, and E wrong.

A sounds better than B ..
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2012, 21:54
(A) doubling the increase of
phrase refers back to the subject of the main verb "number of people..."

(B) doubling that of the increase in
"that of" does not have a clear antecedent.

(C) double as much as the increase of
"twice as much as" is the correct form

(D) twice as many as the increase in
"many" cannot be used as comparative for the subject "number", needs to be "much".

(E) twice as many as the increase of
same as D
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2015, 22:46
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IMO A.
Analysis:
Whhile modifying the complete clause, VERBing modifier WITH COMMA contributes to the sentence meaning in two ways:
- How the main clause action happened
- Effect of main clause action.
This sentence is a case for the 2nd one (Effect of main clause action).
The number rose --- Effect ---> doubled the increase of previous year.

POE:
B: "that of" refers back to "the number", making the option "the number of increase"!!!! - INCORRECT
C: "as much as" compares "the number" with "increase of.." - ILLOGICAL. Apart from that, use of "as much as" for comparing number is not very convincing. INCORRECT
D: Same as C ILLOGICAL comparison - INCORRECT
E: Same as C ILLOGICAL comparison - INCORRECT
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2016, 07:31
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abh007 wrote:


TWICE or TWO TIMES is the FREQUENCY. On the other hand DOUBLE is QUANTITY X 2.

Ex. The stock prices of the company DOUBLED when they rose sharply TWICE in the same day.


We could also use twice to indicate a multiple x2, isn't it?

My age is double your age.
My age is twice as your age.
I am two times as old as you.

All the above three sentences mean the same, isn't it?.. none of them refer to frequency, but to a multiple.

The point is, twice or two times could be used for two different meanings:

1. frequency, as you stated (because of the word times)
2. multiple x2, as I mentioned above.

However double can only be used to refer to the multiple x2.
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2016, 10:37
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The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

A. doubling the increase of - -ing participle word correctly links the second part sentence of the sentence to the first.
B. doubling that of the increase in - that does not refer to anything
C. double as much as the increase of . - double and "as much as" are both comparison words. "as much as is used for uncountable things"
D. twice as many as the increase in - twice and "as many as" are both comparison words - Redundancy
E. twice as many as the increase of - twice and "as many as" are both comparison words - Redundancy

souvik101990 merge the topics @shttp://gmatclub.com/forum/the-number-of-people-flying-first-class-on-domestic-flights-80878.html
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2016, 07:30
The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

A. doubling the increase of
B. doubling that of the increase in
C. double as much as the increase of
D. twice as many as the increase in
E. twice as many as the increase of


I think it's D.

But OA is A...WHY??

the number of people is countable so many can be used.
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2016, 07:59
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soumya170293 wrote:
The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

A. doubling the increase of
B. doubling that of the increase in
C. double as much as the increase of
D. twice as many as the increase in
E. twice as many as the increase of


I think it's D.

But OA is A...WHY??

the number of people is countable so many can be used.


Because GMAT prefers more concise wording, "twice as many as" can be expressed as "double" replaces the word. That's why C, D , E are out.

Between A & B, B is out because doubling that of the increase in previous year" should be "that of previous year" or it shouldn't be using "that of".

In my opinion Answer is A is most suitable one.

+1 if this helped :wink:
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Dec 2016, 01:47
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bigoyal wrote:
The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

A. doubling the increase of
B. doubling that of the increase in
C. double as much as the increase of
D. twice as many as the increase in
E. twice as many as the increase of



Quote:
How does one go ahead. I was stuck between Aand B. I was trying to see where the pronoun was pointing to. Please advice


(B) is incorrect because "that" has no antecedent. We need to double the increase but "increase" is not mentioned before "that".
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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mdacosta wrote:
what is the difference between A and B? CDE are clearly wrong, but is it that the word 'that' in B has no referent and thus B is wrong?



Yes, in option (B), "that" is used as a pronoun. It needs to have an antecedent. But it doesn't.

(B) The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling that of the increase in the previous year.

What does "that" stand for here?

"that" stands for "the increase" but it hasn't been mentioned before.

e.g.
Democrats have rated the U.N. more positively than Republicans, with Democrats' average approval rating (46%) nearly doubling that of Republicans (24%).

"that" stands for "average approval rating". The pronoun needs an antecedent.

In option (B), the pronoun "that" has no antecedent.
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2018, 17:28
The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

The clause “The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990” is the cause and the clause after the comma modifies this whole clause as it has to be the result/‘leading to’ of the clause before the comma.
Hence the options C,D, and E go out.

A. doubling the increase of
Doubling modifies the whole preceding clause, and ‘increase of’ that it is the increase of something else.

B. doubling that of the increase in
“That of” has no antecedent., and when it is “increase in” it basically means that the something increased itself. Previous year didn’t increase itself.

C. double as much as the increase of

D. twice as many as the increase in
Twice… i.e. the noun modifier has no noun to modify.
Many is a countable noun.
Twice also used as the frequency indicator.
and when it is “increase in” it basically means that the something increased itself. Previous year didn’t increase itself.

E. twice as many as the increase of
Many is a countable noun used here
Twice also used as the frequency indicator.

Here the word double can only be used in the most appropriate manner.
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2019, 03:27
A is the only error-free option.

Option B is wrong because “that” doesn’t have a clear antecedent. C D and E all have the error that there is an adjective and it is not clear what noun it is supposed to refer to. In C the adjective is “double” and in D and E the adjective is “twice”.
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2019, 04:43
I was thinking that the antecedent refers to the 'number of people' . That is why I chose B. please help explain why B is wrong. thanks
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2019, 16:08
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Leonaann wrote:
I was thinking that the antecedent refers to the 'number of people' . That is why I chose B. please help explain why B is wrong. thanks

Here's the full sentence again, with (B) inserted:

Quote:
The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling that of the increase in the previous year.

If we replace the pronoun "that" with "number of people", we get nonsense: "The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the number of people of the increase in the previous year." I can't make any sense of that at all.

I hope this helps!
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2019, 23:26
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bigoyal wrote:
The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.


(A) doubling the increase of

(B) doubling that of the increase in

(C) double as much as the increase of

(D) twice as many as the increase in

(E) twice as many as the increase of


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"the increase in X" means that X itself has increased. therefore, "the increase in the previous year" doesn't make sense, because the implication would be that the previous year itself had increased (what would that possibly mean?).
eliminate (B) & (D).
**********

"That" refers to the number of people.
b. doubling "the number of people" of the increase in the previous year.

Also note that the correct answer replaces "that" with "increase." You're saying the increase doubled, not the number of people flying first class. Important meaning shift.

"the increase of TIME PERIOD", by contrast, means exactly what it should mean in this particular instance.
Another reason to eliminate (B)
***************

if you say "twice as many", then this construction should be paired with a countable noun.
e.g., twice as many dogs --> "dogs" is a countable noun

if you said "twice as much", then this construction should be paired with an uncountable noun.
e.g., twice as much water --> "water" is an uncountable noun

if the noun in question is already an explicitly numerical quantity, then you should use neither "much" nor "many". instead, you should just use "twice" or "double" by itself.
e.g., twice the increase --> "increase" is an explicitly numerical quantity

these rules are followed pretty closely.
so, for instance:
twice as much water --> correct, since "water" is an uncountable noun (but is not an explicitly numerical quantity)
twice the water... --> incorrect, since water is not a numerical quantity

twice as much as the increase... --> incorrect; redundant
twice the increase... --> correct

So you can not use "as much as/as many as" if the noun(increase) is an explicitly numerical quantity.
and also in (D) & (E), you can not use "MANY" with uncountable noun "increase"
eliminate (C), (D) and (E)

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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2019, 18:41
egmat wrote:
Hi All,

The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

Let’s first understand the meaning of this sentence. The year 1990 experienced a sharp rise in the number of people flying first class on domestic flights. This rise doubled the increase seen previous year.

Error Analysis:

This sentence uses verb-ing modifier “doubling” preceded by a comma. This means that this modifier will modify the entire preceding clause. Usage of “doubling” is correct here because it correctly presents the result of the preceding clause. There was a rise sharp in the number of specific passengers. This rise doubled the increased witnessed the previous year. Hence there is no error in this sentence.

POE:


a. doubling the increase of: Correct for the reason stated above.

b. doubling that of the increase in: Incorrect.
1. There is no antecedent of pronoun “that”.
2. When we say “increase in something”, the phrase means that “something” has increased itself. Hence, this phrase does not make sense in this choice as it suggests that “the previous year” increased itself.

c. double as much as the increase of: Incorrect.
1. Here “double”, a noun modifier has no particular noun to refer to.
2. The correct way to say is “double the increase” and not “double as much as the increase…”.

d. twice as many as the increase in: Inocrrect.
1. Noun modifier “twice” dos not have a noun to refer to.
2. Use of “many” for uncountable noun “increase” is incorrect.
3. Repeats the idiom error of choice B.

e. twice as many as the increase of: Incorrect. This choice repeats the first two errors of Choice D.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha


A implies that the number of people has done the action of 'doubling the incerase' whereas 'the rise' actually doubled the increase. Is this usage okay?
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2019, 21:55
sups3906 wrote:
A implies that the number of people has done the action of 'doubling the incerase' whereas 'the rise' actually doubled the increase. Is this usage okay?

Hi sups3906, you are absolutely right. That's the reason such participial phrases (doubling the increase here) act both as adjective as well as adverbial modifier; adverbial because such participial phrases modify the verb of the previous clause (in this case rose).
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2019, 22:44
I have doubt regarding this part :

Quote:
d. twice as many as the increase in: Inocrrect.
1. Noun modifier “twice” dos not have a noun to refer to.
2. Use of “many” for uncountable noun “increase” is incorrect.
3. Repeats the idiom error of choice B.


The increase refers to the new number of people who are availing first class after a sharp rise. Since the number of people are countable, why can't we use 'many'?

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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2019, 11:48
egmat wrote:
Hi All,

The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharply in 1990, doubling the increase of the previous year.

Let’s first understand the meaning of this sentence. The year 1990 experienced a sharp rise in the number of people flying first class on domestic flights. This rise doubled the increase seen previous year.

Error Analysis:

This sentence uses verb-ing modifier “doubling” preceded by a comma. This means that this modifier will modify the entire preceding clause. Usage of “doubling” is correct here because it correctly presents the result of the preceding clause. There was a rise sharp in the number of specific passengers. This rise doubled the increased witnessed the previous year. Hence there is no error in this sentence.

POE:

a. doubling the increase of: Correct for the reason stated above.

b. doubling that of the increase in: Incorrect.
1. There is no antecedent of pronoun “that”.
2. When we say “increase in something”, the phrase means that “something” has increased itself. Hence, this phrase does not make sense in this choice as it suggests that “the previous year” increased itself.

c. double as much as the increase of: Incorrect.
1. Here “double”, a noun modifier has no particular noun to refer to.
2. The correct way to say is “double the increase” and not “double as much as the increase…”.

d. twice as many as the increase in: Inocrrect.
1. Noun modifier “twice” dos not have a noun to refer to.
2. Use of “many” for uncountable noun “increase” is incorrect.
3. Repeats the idiom error of choice B.

e. twice as many as the increase of: Incorrect. This choice repeats the first two errors of Choice D.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi, in this question, you mentioned that "twice" and "double" have no noun entity to refer to, but won't "the number" do the job of that noun entity?
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Re: The number of people flying first class on domestic flights rose sharp   [#permalink] 10 Jun 2019, 11:48

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