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The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde

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The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Aug 2018, 07:24
2
16
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

86% (00:47) correct 14% (01:00) wrong based on 2495 sessions

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The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 10th Edition, 2003

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 78
Page: 665

The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowded, which results in loss in vigor, and spread too far outward, producing a bare center.

(A) which results in loss in vigor, and spread

(B) resulting in loss in vigor, or spreading

(C) with the result of loss of vigor, or spreading

(D) resulting in loss of vigor, or spread

(E) with a resulting loss of vigor, and spread

comma + with (adverbial modifier) = LINK1 & LINK 2 & LINK 3 & LINK 4 & LINK 7

Originally posted by bmwhype2 on 18 Jun 2007, 13:35.
Last edited by hazelnut on 08 Aug 2018, 07:24, edited 8 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2007, 19:16
bmwhype2 wrote:
822. The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowded, which results in loss in vigor, and spread too far outward, producing a bare center.
(A) which results in loss in vigor, and spread
(B) resulting in loss in vigor, or spreading
(C) with the result of loss of vigor, or spreading
(D) resulting in loss of vigor, or spread
(E) with a resulting loss of vigor, and spread

Please explain WHY an answer is wrong. :lol:


D for 2 reasons:
1.Idiom:either X or Y
2. IIlism: resulting ,producing
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2013, 23:59
822. The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowded, which results in loss in vigor, and spread too far outward, producing a bare center.
(A) which results in loss in vigor, and spread
(B) resulting in loss in vigor, or spreading
(C) with the result of loss of vigor, or spreading
(D) resulting in loss of vigor, or spread
(E) with a resulting loss of vigor, and spread

The sentence is using the idiom either X or Y. The only case which satisfies parallelism between X and Y is D -

either become too crowded, <-ing modifier>, or spread too far outward, <-ing modifier>.

The other choices donot satisfy parallelism. B,C use participles and don't have a main verb in X and Y both. A and E use AND instead of OR
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2015, 05:50
1
The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowded, which results in loss in vigor, and spread too far outward, producing a bare center.

1.The root systems of most flowering perennials does one out of two things in either X or Y way
they either
    become too crowded
    or spread too far outward

2. when the root systems of perennials become crowded, it results in loss of vigor
and this resulting action is best described in verb-ing form resulting since becoming crowded is an action.
Similarly, spreading action result is best represented by producing a bare center in non underlined part of sentence and both verb-ing parts are parallel.


coming to options
(A) which results in loss in vigor, and spread
which cannot refer to action and
loss in vigor is not idiomatic
either x or y is structure is disturbed by using and instead of or.


(B) resulting in loss in vigor, or spreading
loss in vigor as in A is not resolved yet
spreading is not parallel to become


(C) with the result of loss of vigor, or spreading
with the result is awkward
spreading is not parallel to become


(D) resulting in loss of vigor, or spread
correct

(E) with a resulting loss of vigor, and spread
errors as in A and B repeat here
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2017, 08:28
The word "either" is great to see, especially in the non-underlined portion of a SC question, because it is part of a reliable idiom. If you see the word 'either' in the non-underlined portion, you know two things:

1) The work 'or' will show up later in the sentence
2) What follows the 'either' and what follows the 'or' will be in parallel form

A and E can be eliminated because they don't have an 'or'.

B and C can be eliminated because what follows the 'or' (spreading) is not parallel with what follows the 'either' (become).
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2017, 04:10
Hello, I have applied the structure here in this question "Either X or Y'". Since this question includes parallelism too, I have applied that too and marked the option B as my answer choice considering "ing" then how my answer became wrong? Please advise.
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2017, 05:50
chandanindira wrote:
Hello, I have applied the structure here in this question "Either X or Y'". Since this question includes parallelism too, I have applied that too and marked the option B as my answer choice considering "ing" then how my answer became wrong? Please advise.


The parallel structure, as you have correctly identified, is EITHER X OR Y.
Here X = become (a verb). So Y should also be verb.

In B, present participle "spreading" is wrongly made parallel to verb "become".
In D, verb "spread" is correctly made parallel to verb "become".
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2017, 10:28
2
The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowded, which results in loss in vigor, and spread too far outward, producing a bare center.

Issues: Idiom | Parallelism

Analysis:
1. To complete the non-underlined "either...", we need "or.." to complete idiom "either X or Y"
2. Also, X and Y in idiom should be parallel.


(A) which results in loss in vigor, and spread
- "which" does have referent
- "and" is unidiomatic


(B) resulting in loss in vigor, or spreading
- "spreading" not parallel "become"

(C) with the result of loss of vigor, or spreading
- "spreading" not parallel "become"

(D) resulting in loss of vigor, or spread

(E) with a resulting loss of vigor, and spread
- "and" is unidiomatic

Answer: (D)
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2017, 20:01
The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowded, which results in loss in vigor, and spread too far outward, producing a bare center.

There are two flaws in the original sentence.
1. The idiom either A or B is not used
2. The phrase 'loss in vigor' is incorrect.

Using 1, we can eliminate A & E

Using 2, we can eliminate B

Answer choice C uses a redundant double preposition 'of loss of vigor', hence eliminate.
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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2018, 04:18
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowde &nbs [#permalink] 19 Sep 2018, 04:18
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