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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an

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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2005, 03:06
4
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A
B
C
D
E

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  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

38% (01:34) correct 62% (01:54) wrong based on 1270 sessions

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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?

A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
E When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.

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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2005, 02:04
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ОА is C

Yes, this is a tough one.

Let's analize B and C (it's easy to eliminate A,D,E)
We have Theory 1: they pause to have rest
and Theory 2: they pause to process visual information

B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
=> The visual info is rocessed OK. Theory 2 is undermined. When you go down an incline - it's easier for you to go, so you need rest rarely. But here it is said that no matter up or down - the intervals are equal. Theory 1 is also undermined.

C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
=> Speed increases after pause - not after the insect begins to flee: that means that Theory 2 has a point - there's a problem with visual info. Intervals remain the same: speed_before*time < speed_after*time - the distance is greater, and the beetle is not tired. This undermines Theory 1.

Here it is, I think.
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Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 00:50
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IMO C.

Hypothesis1 is: tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information
Hypothesis2 is: so quickly go blind and stop.

Only C states the scenario to support hypothesis1 but hurt hypothesis2. "responds immediately to changes in the insect’s direction" supports the hypothesis1 while ignores the blind issue.

In E whether beetle stops due to blindness or changing variation is not clear. Whereas C clearly states the cause.
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Re: #Top150 CR: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2015, 02:16
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Mechmeera wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect.
However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack.
Theory1: Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest;
Theory2: while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.


can someone explain why B is wrong and C is right?


Hi,
I would like to add my 2 cents,

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
- The beetle changes its direction readily in pursuing a moving insect: what we get from this? Probably Tiger Beetles (TB) got GOOD vision. Theory 2 ruled out. Fine. They pause equally frequently no matter chasing up or down. Conclusion? Maintaining pace is NO big deal. Going down definitely gives TB more pace than going up. Theory 2 also gone. But we got undermine any one of the theories. ELIMINATE.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
- fixed time interval between pauses - this part supports that TB actually can't maintain too much pace(supports Theory 1). As if, TB got to stop after attaining X miles/hr speed. TB increases its speed as stationary insect begins to flee - TB has a great vision(Theory 2 undermined). C seems GOOD.

I think its a fairly lengthy CR in terms of amount of thinking involved, a fact that the author utilized in devising a trick answer choice B, which is a great choice except for its undermining both the theories. :wink:

Binit.
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Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2016, 18:33
Keats wrote:
Can you please explain the correct answer C here. I have traversed a lot of forums and explanations and I am not able to find a satisfying explanation. Please if you can attend chetan2u


Hi,
Just read few posts above yours and my understanding of C is slightly different....

C tells us that the beetles pause at regular intervals....
Say it pauses after 10 secs....
When the insect is stationary, it travels at a slower speed say 6m per minute so it travels 1 m and pauses..
Now the insect is fleeing and the beetle increases its speed to say 12m per minute...
Now it travels 2 m in 10 secs and then pauses..

BUT if the beetle was getting tired and taking rest it should have stopped after traveling 1 m in second case too that is after five seconds and not 10 seconds..

So it means the beetle stops to adjust its vision after regular intervals..
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