GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 05 Apr 2020, 22:11

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 54
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 14 Oct 2018, 00:51
9
154
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

35% (02:35) correct 65% (02:39) wrong based on 2354 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?


A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.

D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.


Source GMATPrep Software by Pearson VUE

Originally posted by Pauline on 23 Jul 2005, 02:06.
Last edited by Bunuel on 14 Oct 2018, 00:51, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 54
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jul 2005, 01:04
46
1
10
ОА is C

Yes, this is a tough one.

Let's analize B and C (it's easy to eliminate A,D,E)
We have Theory 1: they pause to have rest
and Theory 2: they pause to process visual information

B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
=> The visual info is rocessed OK. Theory 2 is undermined. When you go down an incline - it's easier for you to go, so you need rest rarely. But here it is said that no matter up or down - the intervals are equal. Theory 1 is also undermined.

C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
=> Speed increases after pause - not after the insect begins to flee: that means that Theory 2 has a point - there's a problem with visual info. Intervals remain the same: speed_before*time < speed_after*time - the distance is greater, and the beetle is not tired. This undermines Theory 1.

Here it is, I think.
General Discussion
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 388
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2008, 23:50
1
IMO C.

Hypothesis1 is: tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information
Hypothesis2 is: so quickly go blind and stop.

Only C states the scenario to support hypothesis1 but hurt hypothesis2. "responds immediately to changes in the insect’s direction" supports the hypothesis1 while ignores the blind issue.

In E whether beetle stops due to blindness or changing variation is not clear. Whereas C clearly states the cause.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2014
Posts: 177
GMAT Date: 08-04-2015
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Oct 2015, 01:16
5
3
Mechmeera wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect.
However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack.
Theory1: Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest;
Theory2: while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.


can someone explain why B is wrong and C is right?


Hi,
I would like to add my 2 cents,

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
- The beetle changes its direction readily in pursuing a moving insect: what we get from this? Probably Tiger Beetles (TB) got GOOD vision. Theory 2 ruled out. Fine. They pause equally frequently no matter chasing up or down. Conclusion? Maintaining pace is NO big deal. Going down definitely gives TB more pace than going up. Theory 2 also gone. But we got undermine any one of the theories. ELIMINATE.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
- fixed time interval between pauses - this part supports that TB actually can't maintain too much pace(supports Theory 1). As if, TB got to stop after attaining X miles/hr speed. TB increases its speed as stationary insect begins to flee - TB has a great vision(Theory 2 undermined). C seems GOOD.

I think its a fairly lengthy CR in terms of amount of thinking involved, a fact that the author utilized in devising a trick answer choice B, which is a great choice except for its undermining both the theories. :wink:

Binit.
Math Expert
avatar
V
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 8311
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Oct 2016, 17:33
2
1
Keats wrote:
Can you please explain the correct answer C here. I have traversed a lot of forums and explanations and I am not able to find a satisfying explanation. Please if you can attend chetan2u


Hi,
Just read few posts above yours and my understanding of C is slightly different....

C tells us that the beetles pause at regular intervals....
Say it pauses after 10 secs....
When the insect is stationary, it travels at a slower speed say 6m per minute so it travels 1 m and pauses..
Now the insect is fleeing and the beetle increases its speed to say 12m per minute...
Now it travels 2 m in 10 secs and then pauses..

BUT if the beetle was getting tired and taking rest it should have stopped after traveling 1 m in second case too that is after five seconds and not 10 seconds..

So it means the beetle stops to adjust its vision after regular intervals..
_________________
Current Student
User avatar
P
Joined: 26 Aug 2016
Posts: 558
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, International Business
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V33
GMAT 2: 700 Q50 V33
GMAT 3: 730 Q51 V38
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Reviews Badge
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jul 2018, 19:35
3
Lets decipher:

Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Tiger beetles stop intermittently in between while running.
1st theory : They stop because they become tired.
2nd Theory: While running tiger beetles are unable to process resulting rapidly changing information and go blind and stop.



Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?


A When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.
They won't stop... This guy undermines both the theories. Both theories say they stop because X and because Y. A says they never stop. --- OUT

B In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.
They immediately respond to insects change in direction. - So they can process the information quickly cool. - Theory 2 is failing
They pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline- what the fish... So It is not because they become tired ? When running down the cliff they expend less energy so they should stop in NON-EQUAL intervals when compared to when they climb up. - So it is not because they become tired. - Theory 1 is failing - JUST last phrase kicks the option OUT. We need to read the whole option from now on..

C The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.
Fixed time interval between pauses - OK nice they become tired at regular intervals when running. - Supporting Theory 1
Although when the insect that had been stationary begins to flee. - Wow they maintain fixed pauses even when the insect changes its direction and movement - Now It undermines Theory 2.

ANSWER

D If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.
wow nothing... It supports neither theory 1 nor theory 2 ... OUT

E When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.
SOMETIMES..... not a good one.. OUT
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 10 Aug 2018
Posts: 291
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Operations
WE: Operations (Energy and Utilities)
Reviews Badge
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Aug 2019, 23:12
Indeed a nice question.
Between B and C we have to carefully read each word/phrase.
'the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction' ----This undermines the second conclusion.
'Stops equally frequently when moving up or down' ------This undermines the first conclusion.

C is the answer.
_________________
On the way to get into the B-school and I will not leave it until I win. WHATEVER IT TAKES.

" I CAN AND I WILL"
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 10240
Location: Pune, India
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2019, 02:31
1
Pauline wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?


A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.

D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.


Source GMATPrep Software by Pearson VUE


First, take a look at the argument:

Tiger beetles are very fast runners.
When running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack.
There are two hypotheses presented for this behavior:

The beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment’s rest.
While running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.
We need to support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other. We don’t know which one will be supported and which will be undermined. How will we support/undermine a hypothesis?

The beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment’s rest.

Support: Something that tells us that they do get tired. e.g. going uphill they pause more.

Undermine: Something that says that fatigue plays no role e.g. the frequency of pauses do not increase as the chase continues.

While running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Support: Something that says that they are not able to process changing visual information e.g. as speed increases, frequency of pauses increases.

Undermine: Something that says that they are able to process changing visual information e.g. it doesn’t pause on turns.

Now, we need to look at each answer choice to see which one supports one hypothesis and undermines the other. Focus on the impact each option has on our two hypotheses:

(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

This undermines both hypotheses. If the beetle is able to run without stopping in some situations, it means that it is not a physical ailment that makes him take pauses. He is not trying to catch his breath – so to say – nor is he adjusting his field of vision.

(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

If the beetle alters its course while running, it is obviously processing changing visual information and changing its course accordingly while running. This undermines the hypothesis “it cannot process rapidly changing visual information”. However, if the beetle pauses more frequently as the chase progresses, it is tiring out more and more due to the long chase and, hence, is taking more frequent breaks. This supports the hypothesis, “it cannot maintain its speed and pauses for rest”.

Answer choice B strengthens one hypothesis and undermines the other. This must be the answer, but let’s check our other options, just to be sure:

(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect’s direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

This answer choice undermines both hypotheses. If the beetle responds immediately to changes in direction, it is able to process changing visual information. In addition, if the beetle takes similar pauses going up or down, it is not the effort of running that is making it take the pauses (otherwise, going up, it would have taken more pauses since it takes more effort going up).

(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

This answer choice might strengthen the hypothesis that the beetle is not able to respond to changing visual information since it decides whether it is giving up or not after pausing (in case there is a certain stance that tells us that it has paused), but it doesn’t actually undermine the hypothesis that the beetle pauses to rest. It is very possible that it pauses to rest, and at that time assesses the situation and decides whether it wants to continue the chase. Hence, this option doesn’t undermine either hypothesis and cannot be our answer.

(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

This answer choice strengthens both of the hypotheses. The faster the beetle runs, the more rest it would need, and the more rapidly visual information would change causing the beetle to pause. Because this option does not undermine either hypothesis, it also cannot be our answer.

Only answer choice B strengthens one hypothesis and undermines the other, therefore, our answer must be B.

Also discussed on our blog here: https://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2016/0 ... tion-gmat/
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Posts: 15
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Sep 2019, 20:23
VeritasKarishma wrote:
Pauline wrote:
Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually any nonflying insect. However, when running toward an insect, the beetles intermittently stop, and then, a moment later, resume their attack. Perhaps they cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment's rest; but an alternative hypothesis is that while running tiger beetles are unable to process the resulting rapidly changing visual information, and so quickly go blind and stop.

Which of the following, if discovered in experiments using artificially moved prey insects, would support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other?


A. When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately turns and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.

D. If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

E. When an obstacle is suddenly introduced just in front of running beetles, the beetles sometimes stop immediately, but they never respond by running around the barrier.


Source GMATPrep Software by Pearson VUE


First, take a look at the argument:

Tiger beetles are very fast runners.
When running toward an insect, a tiger beetle will intermittently stop and then, a moment later, resume its attack.
There are two hypotheses presented for this behavior:

The beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment’s rest.
While running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.
We need to support one of the two hypotheses and undermine the other. We don’t know which one will be supported and which will be undermined. How will we support/undermine a hypothesis?

The beetles cannot maintain their pace and must pause for a moment’s rest.

Support: Something that tells us that they do get tired. e.g. going uphill they pause more.

Undermine: Something that says that fatigue plays no role e.g. the frequency of pauses do not increase as the chase continues.

While running, tiger beetles are unable to adequately process the resulting rapidly changing visual information and so quickly go blind and stop.

Support: Something that says that they are not able to process changing visual information e.g. as speed increases, frequency of pauses increases.

Undermine: Something that says that they are able to process changing visual information e.g. it doesn’t pause on turns.

Now, we need to look at each answer choice to see which one supports one hypothesis and undermines the other. Focus on the impact each option has on our two hypotheses:

(A) When a prey insect is moved directly toward a beetle that has been chasing it, the beetle immediately stops and runs away without its usual intermittent stopping.

This undermines both hypotheses. If the beetle is able to run without stopping in some situations, it means that it is not a physical ailment that makes him take pauses. He is not trying to catch his breath – so to say – nor is he adjusting his field of vision.

(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

If the beetle alters its course while running, it is obviously processing changing visual information and changing its course accordingly while running. This undermines the hypothesis “it cannot process rapidly changing visual information”. However, if the beetle pauses more frequently as the chase progresses, it is tiring out more and more due to the long chase and, hence, is taking more frequent breaks. This supports the hypothesis, “it cannot maintain its speed and pauses for rest”.

Answer choice B strengthens one hypothesis and undermines the other. This must be the answer, but let’s check our other options, just to be sure:

(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect’s direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

This answer choice undermines both hypotheses. If the beetle responds immediately to changes in direction, it is able to process changing visual information. In addition, if the beetle takes similar pauses going up or down, it is not the effort of running that is making it take the pauses (otherwise, going up, it would have taken more pauses since it takes more effort going up).

(D) If, when a beetle pauses, it has not gained on the insect it is pursuing, the beetle generally ends its pursuit.

This answer choice might strengthen the hypothesis that the beetle is not able to respond to changing visual information since it decides whether it is giving up or not after pausing (in case there is a certain stance that tells us that it has paused), but it doesn’t actually undermine the hypothesis that the beetle pauses to rest. It is very possible that it pauses to rest, and at that time assesses the situation and decides whether it wants to continue the chase. Hence, this option doesn’t undermine either hypothesis and cannot be our answer.

(E) The faster a beetle pursues an insect fleeing directly away from it, the more frequently the beetle stops.

This answer choice strengthens both of the hypotheses. The faster the beetle runs, the more rest it would need, and the more rapidly visual information would change causing the beetle to pause. Because this option does not undermine either hypothesis, it also cannot be our answer.

Only answer choice B strengthens one hypothesis and undermines the other, therefore, our answer must be B.

Also discussed on our blog here: https://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2016/0 ... tion-gmat/


Hi Karishma,

Can you please clarify below?

The question have these two choices:

B. In pursuing a moving insect, the beetles usually respond immediately to changes in the insect's direction, and pause equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

C. The beetles maintain a fixed time interval between pauses, although when an insect that had been stationary begins to flee, the beetle increases its speed after its next pause.

But your response as below choices:

(B) In pursuing a swerving insect, a beetle alters its course while running and its pauses become more frequent as the chase progresses.

(C) In pursuing a moving insect, a beetle usually responds immediately to changes in the insect’s direction, and it pauses equally frequently whether the chase is up or down an incline.

Is the correct choice what you have in answer or question stem?
VP
VP
User avatar
D
Joined: 18 Dec 2017
Posts: 1271
Location: United States (KS)
GMAT 1: 600 Q46 V27
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2019, 08:55
Quote:
Hi,
Just read few posts above yours and my understanding of C is slightly different....

C tells us that the beetles pause at regular intervals....
Say it pauses after 10 secs....
When the insect is stationary, it travels at a slower speed say 6m per minute so it travels 1 m and pauses..
Now the insect is fleeing and the beetle increases its speed to say 12m per minute...
Now it travels 2 m in 10 secs and then pauses..

BUT if the beetle was getting tired and taking rest it should have stopped after traveling 1 m in second case too that is after five seconds and not 10 seconds..

So it means the beetle stops to adjust its vision after regular intervals..


chetan2u

Hello Sir,
So I did read your explanation and it makes sense to me. But just for full proofing the argument , can you tell me, based on your analysis, which hypothesis is undermined and which one is supported?

I know a similar question exists and for which OA is B. That one clearly undermines one and supports another one. But this one is confusing.
_________________
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long

Why You Don’t Deserve A 700 On Your GMAT

Learn from the Legend himself: All GMAT Ninja LIVE YouTube videos by topic
You are missing on great learning if you don't know what this is: Project SC Butler
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an   [#permalink] 04 Nov 2019, 08:55
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Tiger beetles are such fast runners that they can capture virtually an

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne