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Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che

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Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring chemical elements , is more abundant in the Earth's crust than silver, mercury, or iodine.

= of the stable, naturally-occurring chemical elements
= of the chemical elements to be stable and naturally occurring
= of the elements that are stable and naturally occurring
= stable and naturally occurring of the chemical elements
= chemical elements stable and naturally occurring
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by blueseas on 26 Aug 2013, 23:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2013, 12:50
i think it should be C. because that implies only those element( Ur, Silver, mercury and iodine) which are stable and naturally occuring.
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2013, 13:48
Between C & D. IMO C.

In D, naturally occurring 'of the' is awkward.
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2013, 23:07
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adityapagadala wrote:
Whats wrong with A?


OE by KAPLAN
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence contains no grammatical errors as written and has no glaring style issues. However, time permitting, the other answer choices should always be tested systematically, even when "correct as written" is expected.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

With no error to scan for and no obvious correct/incorrect split in the answer choices, Step 2 is impractical for this problem. Unfortunately, answers must be eliminated one by one.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

Choices (B) and (C) both reconstruct the underlined portion with more words and less clarity than the original. Eliminate them both.

Choice (D) introduces clarity problems by rearranging the original’s word order and placing the word "stable" right after the adjective "heaviest." Eliminate.

Choice (E) is very confusing, implying that uranium is a plural noun and making the sentence’s logic generally difficult to follow. Eliminate.

The sentence as written makes its point in a correct, concise, and stylistically sound manner, so Answer Choice (A) is correct.
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2013, 23:56
blueseas wrote:
adityapagadala wrote:
Whats wrong with A?


OE by KAPLAN
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence contains no grammatical errors as written and has no glaring style issues. However, time permitting, the other answer choices should always be tested systematically, even when "correct as written" is expected.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

With no error to scan for and no obvious correct/incorrect split in the answer choices, Step 2 is impractical for this problem. Unfortunately, answers must be eliminated one by one.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

Choices (B) and (C) both reconstruct the underlined portion with more words and less clarity than the original. Eliminate them both.

Choice (D) introduces clarity problems by rearranging the original’s word order and placing the word "stable" right after the adjective "heaviest." Eliminate.

Choice (E) is very confusing, implying that uranium is a plural noun and making the sentence’s logic generally difficult to follow. Eliminate.

The sentence as written makes its point in a correct, concise, and stylistically sound manner, so Answer Choice (A) is correct.



Exactly ..!!

thanks for the explanation..!!
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2013, 04:56
I reduced the choices to C and A and chose C. I felt that "that are stable and naturally occuring" is clearer than "of the stable, naturally occuring". I felt that if the comma in A after "stable", is replaced by "and" as in C it would have been perfect. Anyway, now we know there was no error in A.
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2013, 05:00
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blueseas wrote:
adityapagadala wrote:
Whats wrong with A?


OE by KAPLAN
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence contains no grammatical errors as written and has no glaring style issues. However, time permitting, the other answer choices should always be tested systematically, even when "correct as written" is expected.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

With no error to scan for and no obvious correct/incorrect split in the answer choices, Step 2 is impractical for this problem. Unfortunately, answers must be eliminated one by one.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

Choices (B) and (C) both reconstruct the underlined portion with more words and less clarity than the original. Eliminate them both.

Choice (D) introduces clarity problems by rearranging the original’s word order and placing the word "stable" right after the adjective "heaviest." Eliminate.

Choice (E) is very confusing, implying that uranium is a plural noun and making the sentence’s logic generally difficult to follow. Eliminate.

The sentence as written makes its point in a correct, concise, and stylistically sound manner, so Answer Choice (A) is correct.


May I know how C is less clear? I agree A is more concise than C, and C is more wordy, but less clear? "that are stable and naturally occurring" is clear. isn't it? or am I missing something?
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2013, 10:56
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HarishLearner wrote:
blueseas wrote:
adityapagadala wrote:
Whats wrong with A?


OE by KAPLAN
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence contains no grammatical errors as written and has no glaring style issues. However, time permitting, the other answer choices should always be tested systematically, even when "correct as written" is expected.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

With no error to scan for and no obvious correct/incorrect split in the answer choices, Step 2 is impractical for this problem. Unfortunately, answers must be eliminated one by one.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

Choices (B) and (C) both reconstruct the underlined portion with more words and less clarity than the original. Eliminate them both.

Choice (D) introduces clarity problems by rearranging the original’s word order and placing the word "stable" right after the adjective "heaviest." Eliminate.

Choice (E) is very confusing, implying that uranium is a plural noun and making the sentence’s logic generally difficult to follow. Eliminate.

The sentence as written makes its point in a correct, concise, and stylistically sound manner, so Answer Choice (A) is correct.


May I know how C is less clear? I agree A is more concise than C, and C is more wordy, but less clear? "that are stable and naturally occurring" is clear. isn't it? or am I missing something?


Let me try to help.

Noun: chemical elements
Adjectives: stable, naturally occurring
Generally, it's more common and concise to place the adjectives separated with commas before the Noun. At least, this observation has worked for me when stuck between choices such as A and C which are both grammatically correct and differ only in style.

Also, C misses the word "chemical" from the sentence altogether.

Example: Robert De Niro, the oldest among all the tall, well-built actors, is going to feature in the upcoming movie Last Vegas to be released before Christmas this year.
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2013, 12:45
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HarishLearner wrote:
blueseas wrote:
adityapagadala wrote:
Whats wrong with A?


OE by KAPLAN
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence contains no grammatical errors as written and has no glaring style issues. However, time permitting, the other answer choices should always be tested systematically, even when "correct as written" is expected.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

With no error to scan for and no obvious correct/incorrect split in the answer choices, Step 2 is impractical for this problem. Unfortunately, answers must be eliminated one by one.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

Choices (B) and (C) both reconstruct the underlined portion with more words and less clarity than the original. Eliminate them both.

Choice (D) introduces clarity problems by rearranging the original’s word order and placing the word "stable" right after the adjective "heaviest." Eliminate.

Choice (E) is very confusing, implying that uranium is a plural noun and making the sentence’s logic generally difficult to follow. Eliminate.

The sentence as written makes its point in a correct, concise, and stylistically sound manner, so Answer Choice (A) is correct.


May I know how C is less clear? I agree A is more concise than C, and C is more wordy, but less clear? "that are stable and naturally occurring" is clear. isn't it? or am I missing something?


I'll suggest you go through OG13 sentence correction explanations when studying. Don't jump any question you get correctly. Take the pains to study the way the exam setters think and you will understand why they prefer certain structures to the other.

For example take a look at sentence 1 & 2 below:

1. The cute, cuddly monkey escaped from its cage
2. The cute and cuddly monkey escaped from its cage

Nothing is wrong with both sentences but the GMAT can throw both of them at you as options. After going through the OG explanations, you will get to understand that the GMAT prefers sentence 1 to sentence 2. Sentence 1 is more concise because it explains the idea with fewer words without losing the meaning.
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2013, 23:38
knightofdelta wrote:
HarishLearner wrote:
blueseas wrote:
OE by KAPLAN
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence contains no grammatical errors as written and has no glaring style issues. However, time permitting, the other answer choices should always be tested systematically, even when "correct as written" is expected.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

With no error to scan for and no obvious correct/incorrect split in the answer choices, Step 2 is impractical for this problem. Unfortunately, answers must be eliminated one by one.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

Choices (B) and (C) both reconstruct the underlined portion with more words and less clarity than the original. Eliminate them both.

Choice (D) introduces clarity problems by rearranging the original’s word order and placing the word "stable" right after the adjective "heaviest." Eliminate.

Choice (E) is very confusing, implying that uranium is a plural noun and making the sentence’s logic generally difficult to follow. Eliminate.

The sentence as written makes its point in a correct, concise, and stylistically sound manner, so Answer Choice (A) is correct.


May I know how C is less clear? I agree A is more concise than C, and C is more wordy, but less clear? "that are stable and naturally occurring" is clear. isn't it? or am I missing something?


I'll suggest you go through OG13 sentence correction explanations when studying. Don't jump any question you get correctly. Take the pains to study the way the exam setters think and you will understand why they prefer certain structures to the other.

For example take a look at sentence 1 & 2 below:

1. The cute, cuddly monkey escaped from its cage
2. The cute and cuddly monkey escaped from its cage

Nothing is wrong with both sentences but the GMAT can throw both of them at you as options. After going through the OG explanations, you will get to understand that the GMAT prefers sentence 1 to sentence 2. Sentence 1 is more concise because it explains the idea with fewer words without losing the meaning.


I will definitely follow your advice henceforth. :-D
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GMAT Prep : Critical Reasoning Decoded

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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2013, 23:47
Gian wrote:
HarishLearner wrote:
blueseas wrote:

OE by KAPLAN
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence contains no grammatical errors as written and has no glaring style issues. However, time permitting, the other answer choices should always be tested systematically, even when "correct as written" is expected.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

With no error to scan for and no obvious correct/incorrect split in the answer choices, Step 2 is impractical for this problem. Unfortunately, answers must be eliminated one by one.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

Choices (B) and (C) both reconstruct the underlined portion with more words and less clarity than the original. Eliminate them both.

Choice (D) introduces clarity problems by rearranging the original’s word order and placing the word "stable" right after the adjective "heaviest." Eliminate.

Choice (E) is very confusing, implying that uranium is a plural noun and making the sentence’s logic generally difficult to follow. Eliminate.

The sentence as written makes its point in a correct, concise, and stylistically sound manner, so Answer Choice (A) is correct.


May I know how C is less clear? I agree A is more concise than C, and C is more wordy, but less clear? "that are stable and naturally occurring" is clear. isn't it? or am I missing something?


Let me try to help.

Noun: chemical elements
Adjectives: stable, naturally occurring
Generally, it's more common and concise to place the adjectives separated with commas before the Noun. At least, this observation has worked for me when stuck between choices such as A and C which are both grammatically correct and differ only in style.

Also, C misses the word "chemical" from the sentence altogether.

Example: Robert De Niro, the oldest among all the tall, well-built actors, is going to feature in the upcoming movie Last Vegas to be released before Christmas this year.


Thanks. Got it. A very good explanation indeed !
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GMAT Prep : Critical Reasoning Decoded

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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2017, 12:32
Shouldn't there be "and" between "stable" & "naturally occurring" ?
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che [#permalink]

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No. It's quite common to separate two adjectives or adjective phrases with only a comma when they precede a noun, as in "The cow is a beautiful, intelligent animal." Now, if we use those adjectives predicatively, by putting them at the end after the verb, we do need "and": "This cow is beautiful and intelligent."
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Re: Uranium, the heaviest of the stable, naturally-occurring che   [#permalink] 25 Apr 2017, 22:57
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