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When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950

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When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 18 Jun 2018, 15:38
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A
B
C
D
E

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When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950's, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many.

(A) there are less than one-quarter that many

(B) there are fewer than one-quarter as many

(C) there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount

(D) the number is less than one-quarter the amount

(E) it is less than one-quarter of that amount

https://www.nytimes.com/1991/08/31/nyregion/the-last-drive-in-in-new-jersey-is-fading-to-black.html

At the height of their popularity in the late 1950's more than 4,000 of the country's 16,354 movie screens were at drive-ins. This year, with the total number of screens exceeding 23,000, there are only 910 in drive-ins, according to the National Organization of Theater Owners.

In most states, a handful of drive-ins have managed to hold on and, in some western states, drive-ins have even added screens. But when the Route 35 Drive-In closes New Jersey will join Alaska, Rhode Island and Delaware as the only states without a single drive-in, according to the California-based theater organization.

Originally posted by ricokevin on 24 Apr 2007, 05:02.
Last edited by hazelnut on 18 Jun 2018, 15:38, edited 7 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2016, 14:23
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2
sa18 wrote:
Still confused between B and C.
Can someone please explain B? ''as many'' is sort of confusing me.


The comparison marker "as many" is equivalent to mathematical operator multiplication.

You have 2 books; I have 5 times as many (books as you have).

It is allowed to omit the repeated part from the second element of 2 compared elements. Hence the part after "as many" is often deleted, since it is already mentioned within the first element of the comparison.

In option B, the complete ending is actually:

...fewer than one-quarter as many (as existed existed in the United States.)

In this expression, following would be the mathematical equivalent:

fewer than : <
one quarter: 1/4
as many: x (multiplication)
as existed in the US (omitted): 4000

Thus the expression means: < 1/4 x 4000
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2013, 23:20
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Countable: many, several, one, two, each, every, a number of, few
Non-Countable: less, amount, much, hardly any, great,

Less and Amount are incorrect usage for countable nouns. Hence, A, C,D,E are wrong.

Answer: B
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2014, 14:39
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Quote:
When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950тАЩs, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many.

A. there are less than one-quarter that many
B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many
C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount
D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount
E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount


This one can actually be an easy one if you know what to look for. This sentence correction problem tests your knowledge of when to use AMOUNT and LESS/FEWER.

These are the key principles you need to know to get the right answer

[*]AMOUNT - only used to describe objects that CAN'T be counted. For example: Bravery, charisma, and water
[*]NUMBER - used to describe objects that CAN be counted. For example: Cars in the parking lot, puppies in the pound, and zits on my pubescent face

[*]LESS - used to describe objects that can't be counted
[*]FEWER - used to describe objects that can be counted

A weird tip I use is to remember is reciting in my head "There is less air," after all you would never say "There is fewer air."

Now with that out of the way, lets proceed to break this bad boy down.

A. there are less than one-quarter that many

When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950's, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many.


A. there are less than one-quarter that many
Immediately you should know A is wrong. "Drive-ins" are countable and thus should use the word "fewer"


B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many



C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount
"Drive-in" is countable and thus should use the word "number" instead, not amount.

D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount
Same as C. We also should not use "less"

E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount
Same as D.
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2015, 11:31
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When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950’s, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many.

A. there are less than one-quarter that many
B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many
C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount
D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount
E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount

One point o confusion which may arise sometime is

one-quarter of X , 10% of X, etc.
here sometimes , you start thinking the we are to choose between less/few on basis of one-quarter/10% which are non countable.
but it s always about X.

here drive-ins are countable - hence Fewer -- options A, D,E are out

amount is used for non countable thing - hence C is out

correct B

Hope it helps
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2016, 03:40
Still confused between B and C.
Can someone please explain B? ''as many'' is sort of confusing me.
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2016, 13:34
Thanks for your answer !

Here it has to be "fewer" since the object is countable (drive-ins), so A, D, E are eliminated.

But, can you please explain me why C is eliminated ?
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2016, 19:48
1
Alex75PAris wrote:
Thanks for your answer !

Here it has to be "fewer" since the object is countable (drive-ins), so A, D, E are eliminated.

But, can you please explain me why C is eliminated ?


Hi,

C is wrong because of use of 'amount'..
Amount is used to talk of uncountable nouns... example-- amount of water , amount of love etc
and drive-ins are countable
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2016, 23:46
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ricokevin wrote:
When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950тАЩs, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many.

A. there are less than one-quarter that many
B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many
C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount
D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount
E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount

Isn't "amount" used only for uncountable nouns such as "amount of water"? drive-ins in the sentence above is countable, isn't it? And "fewer" is for countables, and "less" is for uncountables...so I picked B. :(

Please explain.


When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950's, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many

There are two very easy decision point here to take into consideration.
4000 is a number, (the number of some object - in this case the number of drive-in)
Number is countable. We use few for countable objects.
Number is countable. We cannot use "less" and "amount" for countable objects. "Amount" is used for uncountable nouns.


A. there are less than one-quarter that many :-
Wrong :-Less is incorrect

B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many. Correct.
Correct:- Avoids using less and amount.

C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount.
Wrong:- Fewer is correct but amount is wrong

D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount.
Wrong:- less and amount are both wrong

E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount.
Wrong:-less and amount are both wrong
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Apr 2017, 05:11
hi all,
although i got the answer as B but can someone explain what does as many refers in option B to me it should be of that not as many

kindly explain
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2017, 08:03
nks2611 wrote:
hi all,
although i got the answer as B but can someone explain what does as many refers in option B to me it should be of that not as many

kindly explain



Hello nks2611,


You ask a good question. :)

The term as many stands for any number used in a sentence in which this phrase has been used.

In Choice B, as many = 4,000 because that is the number that has been used in this official sentence.

The meaning conveyed by Choice B is that now, only a quarter of as many (4000) drive-ins exist in the United States.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 11:59
When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950's, some 4,000 existed in the United States, but today there are less than one-quarter that many.

A. there are less than one-quarter that many ===> Usage of "less" is incorrect as the subject "drive-ins" is countable
B. there are fewer than one-quarter as many ==> CORRECT - Usage of "as many" is correct in English and in GMAT
C. there are fewer than one-quarter of that amount ===> Usage of "amount" is incorrect as "amount" is only used for non-countable nouns and "Drive-ins"
is countable

D. the number is less than one-quarter the amount ===> Usage of "less" is incorrect as the subject "drive-ins" is countable
E. it is less than one-quarter of that amount ===> Usage of "less" is incorrect as the subject "drive-ins" is countable

This is really an interesting question!

Hence, Answer is B

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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950  [#permalink]

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Re: When drive-ins were at the height of their popularity in the late 1950 &nbs [#permalink] 03 Sep 2018, 18:29
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