GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 23 Apr 2019, 17:42

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Almost like clones in their similarity to one another, the cheetah spe

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 11 Aug 2018
Posts: 91
Location: Pakistan
GPA: 2.73
Premium Member
Re: QOTD: Almost like clones in their similarity to one another  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2018, 22:08
Sentence Analysis
As we read the sentence from the beginning, we understand that somethings are almost like clones, and they are like clones in terms of their similarity to each other. So, as we read further, we expect to see a plural noun that can be “like clones”. However, we encounter the noun “the cheetah species’ homogeneity”. Please note that “cheetah species” is not a noun here; it’s acting as an adjective to “homogeneity”.

So, we have an error here – Illogical modification. We know that homogeneity cannot be like clones!

Also, since we have a pronoun “them” (‘makes them especially”), it needs to refer to a noun; however, cheetah species is not acting as a noun in this sentence. Thus, we do not have an antecedent for “them”.
_________________
If you like this post, be kind and help me with Kudos!

Cheers!
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 442
Re: Almost like clones in their similarity to one another, the cheetah spe  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Apr 2019, 14:49
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one issue at a time, and narrow it down to the correct choice! First, let's take a closer look at the original question and highlight any major differences we can find in orange:

Almost like clones in their similarity to one another, the cheetah species’ homogeneity makes them especially vulnerable to disease.

(A) the cheetah species’ homogeneity makes them especially vulnerable to disease
(B) the cheetah species is especially vulnerable to disease because of its homogeneity
(C) the homogeneity of the cheetah species makes it especially vulnerable to disease
(D) homogeneity makes members of the cheetah species especially vulnerable to disease
(E) members of the cheetah species are especially vulnerable to disease because of their homogeneity

After a quick glance over the options, a couple things jump out that we can focus on:

1. Modifiers (leading with homogeneity or cheetahs)
2. Pronouns (them / its / it / their)


Let's start off with #1 in our list: modifiers. Whenever we look at modifiers, we need to ask ourselves these two things:

1. Where is the modifier?
2. What is the modifier referring to?


If we can figure out those two things, we can probably figure out if there are any misplaced, misleading, or just plain wrong modifiers! Here's the original sentence:

Almost like clones in their similarity to one another, the cheetah species’ homogeneity makes them especially vulnerable to disease.

The modifier is the non-underlined portion of the sentence, so we know that has to stay as is. Now we need to ask ourselves, "WHAT is the modifier referring to?" WHAT is almost like clones? Cheetahs! We need to make sure that the modifier is right next to the cheetahs, and nothing else:

(A) the cheetah species’ homogeneity makes them especially vulnerable to disease
(B) the cheetah species is especially vulnerable to disease because of its homogeneity
(C) the homogeneity of the cheetah species makes it especially vulnerable to disease
(D) homogeneity makes members of the cheetah species especially vulnerable to disease
(E) members of the cheetah species are especially vulnerable to disease because of their homogeneity

We can eliminate options A, C, & D because they mislead the reader into thinking that the modifier is referring to homogeneity, and not cheetahs.

Now that we have it narrowed down to only 2 options, let's tackle #2 on our list: pronouns. We need to make sure all pronouns have clear antecedents and that they agree with their antecedents in number:

(B) the cheetah species is especially vulnerable to disease because of its homogeneity

This is INCORRECT because the singular pronoun "its" doesn't agree with the plural antecedent "species."

(E) members of the cheetah species are especially vulnerable to disease because of their homogeneity

This is CORRECT! The pronoun "their" and antecedent "members" are both plural. It's also clear that the modifier in the beginning is referring to cheetahs, and not homogeneity.

There you have it - option E is the correct choice! By focusing on the obvious differences between the options, we can narrow down options quickly to get the right one.


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.
_________________
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Almost like clones in their similarity to one another, the cheetah spe   [#permalink] 09 Apr 2019, 14:49

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 22 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Almost like clones in their similarity to one another, the cheetah spe

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.