GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 21 Jun 2018, 03:33

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 05 Aug 2015
Posts: 22
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Aug 2015, 06:37
Bunuel wrote:
arijitb1980 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Are x and y both positive?
(1) 2x-2y=1
(2) x/y>1

(1) 2x-2y=1. Well this one is clearly insufficient. You can do it with number plugging OR consider the following: x and y both positive means that point (x,y) is in the I quadrant. 2x-2y=1 --> y=x-1/2, we know it's an equation of a line and basically question asks whether this line (all (x,y) points of this line) is only in I quadrant. It's just not possible. Not sufficient.

(2) x/y>1 --> x and y have the same sign. But we don't know whether they are both positive or both negative. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) Again it can be done with different approaches. You should just find the one which is the less time-consuming and comfortable for you personally.

One of the approaches:
\(2x-2y=1\) --> \(x=y+\frac{1}{2}\)
\(\frac{x}{y}>1\) --> \(\frac{x-y}{y}>0\) --> substitute x --> \(\frac{1}{y}>0\) --> \(y\) is positive, and as \(x=y+\frac{1}{2}\), \(x\) is positive too. Sufficient.

Answer: C.

Hello Bunuel,

I am preparing for GMAT and you are a master in quantitatives,I salute you. However this problem I did not understand why it is C.I got E by plugging in numbers.
Considerin Stmt (1)
2x-2y=1
Means x-y=1/2
Now i used 2 numbers x=2,y=1.5 and x= -1.5 and y= -2
So (1) is insufficient as both x and y can be both +ve or -ve.
Stmt(2)
x/y > 1
Means x >y
If i use the above numbers x=2,y=1.5 and x= -1.5 and y= -2
then this holds true but cannot determine if x and y are both positive or negetive.
Combining (1) and (2) I still cannot determine if x and y are both positive or negetive .
So for me answer is E .
Please let me know what am I missing here.

Thanks


As stated above, x= -1.5 and y= -2 does not satisfy the second statement, hence you cannot use these values when plugging numbers.



Hi,

While I see that translating (x/y)>1 into x>y must be wrong, as clearly it lets me use a different range of numbers (and is the reason I chose E instead of C), I don't understand what is wrong with my algebra.

Why can't I multiply (x/y) * y > 1 * y and get x>y?

Thank you.
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
SVP
SVP
User avatar
P
Joined: 08 Jul 2010
Posts: 2114
Location: India
GMAT: INSIGHT
WE: Education (Education)
Reviews Badge
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Aug 2015, 07:07
1
Matthias15 wrote:


Hi,

While I see that translating (x/y)>1 into x>y must be wrong, as clearly it lets me use a different range of numbers (and is the reason I chose E instead of C), I don't understand what is wrong with my algebra.

Why can't I multiply (x/y) * y > 1 * y and get x>y?

Thank you.


Hi Matthias15

If (x/y) > 1

Case-1: If y >0 then x > y

Case-2: If y <0 then x < y

Please note: Multiplying a Negative Number on both sides require the Inequation sign to flip [as mentioned in Case-2]

That's where you are wrong.

I hope it helps!
_________________

Prosper!!!
GMATinsight
Bhoopendra Singh and Dr.Sushma Jha
e-mail: info@GMATinsight.com I Call us : +91-9999687183 / 9891333772
Online One-on-One Skype based classes and Classroom Coaching in South and West Delhi
http://www.GMATinsight.com/testimonials.html

22 ONLINE FREE (FULL LENGTH) GMAT CAT (PRACTICE TESTS) LINK COLLECTION

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 04 Dec 2014
Posts: 11
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 16:00
What happens when y = o?

X = 0.5 and y = 0, satisfies i and x/y is indeed > 0 since anything divided by 0 is infinity. But, despite this, y is not positive as it '0'.

Even in this case -

"One of the approaches:
2x−2y=1 --> x=y+12
xy>1 --> x−yy>0 --> substitute x --> 1y>0 --> y is positive, and as x=y+12, x is positive too. Sufficient."

The moment you assume y = 0, you can easily see that 1/y is infinity that is greater than 0 and hence, satisfies the equation.

Am i missing something. My answer would be 'E'
Expert Post
3 KUDOS received
CEO
CEO
User avatar
P
Joined: 12 Sep 2015
Posts: 2564
Location: Canada
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 16:16
3
1
Manbehindthecurtain wrote:
Are x and y both positive?

(1) 2x-2y = 1
(2) x/y > 1


Target question: Are x and y both positive?

Statement 1: 2x - 2y = 1
There are several pairs of numbers that satisfy this condition. Here are two:
Case a: x = 1 and y = 0.5, in which case x and y are both positive
Case b: x = -0.5 and y = -1, in which case x and y are not both positive
Since we cannot answer the target question with certainty, statement 1 is NOT SUFFICIENT

Statement 2: x/y > 1
This tells us that x/y is positive. This means that either x and y are both positive or x and y are both negative. Here are two possible cases:
Case a: x = 4 and y = 2, in which case x and y are both positive
Case b: x = -4 and y = -2, in which case x and y are not both positive
Since we cannot answer the target question with certainty, statement 2 is NOT SUFFICIENT

Statements 1 and 2
Statement 1 tells us that 2x - 2y = 1.
Divide both sides by 2 to get: x - y = 1/2
Solve for x to get x = y + 1/2

Now take the statement 2 inequality (x/y > 1) and replace x with y + 1/2 to get:
(y + 1/2)/y > 1
Rewrite as: y/y + (1/2)/y > 1
Simplify: 1 + 1/(2y) > 1
Subtract 1 from both sides: 1/(2y) > 0
If 1/(2y) is positive, then y must be positive.

Statement 2 tells us that either x and y are both positive or x and y are both negative.
Now that we know that y is positive, it must be the case that x and y are both positive
Since we can now answer the target question with certainty, the combined statements are SUFFICIENT

Answer: C

Cheers,
Brent
_________________

Brent Hanneson – Founder of gmatprepnow.com

Image

Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
CEO
CEO
User avatar
P
Joined: 12 Sep 2015
Posts: 2564
Location: Canada
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2015, 16:21
2
jitendra31 wrote:
What happens when y = o?
X = 0.5 and y = 0, satisfies i and x/y is indeed > 0 since anything divided by 0 is infinity. But, despite this, y is not positive as it '0'.
'

It may seem that 0.5/0 = infinity, but this is not the case.
If we approach 0 from the positive side, then it looks like 0.5/0 is a REALLY BIG POSITIVE NUMBER
0.5/0.1 = 5
0.5/0.01 = 50
0.5/0.001 = 500
0.5/0.0001 = 5000
0.5/0.00001 = 50000
etc.

But what if we approach 0 from the NEGATIVE side:
0.5/(-0.1) = -5
0.5/(-0.01) = -50
0.5/(-0.001) = -500
0.5/(-0.0001) = -5000
0.5/(-0.00001) = -50000
Here it looks like 0.5/0 will be a REALLY BIG NEGATIVE NUMBER

This is why we say that x/0 is undefined.

Cheers,
Brent
_________________

Brent Hanneson – Founder of gmatprepnow.com

Image

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Target Test Prep Representative
User avatar
G
Status: Head GMAT Instructor
Affiliations: Target Test Prep
Joined: 04 Mar 2011
Posts: 2570
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 May 2016, 06:42
1
LM wrote:
Are x and y both positive?

(1) 2x - 2y = 1
(2) x/y > 1


Solution:

We need to determine whether x and y are both positive.

Statement One Alone:

2x – 2y = 1

Simplifying statement one we have:

2(x – y) = 1

x – y = ½

The information in statement one is not sufficient to determine whether x and y are both positive. For instance if x = 1 and y = ½, x and y are both positive; however if x = -1/2 and y = -1, x and y are not both positive. We can eliminate answer choices A and D.

Statement Two Alone:

x/y > 1

Using the information in statement two, we see that x and y can both be positive or both be negative. Statement two alone is not sufficient to answer the question. We can eliminate answer choice B.

Statements One and Two Together:

Using the information in statements one and two we know that x – y = ½ and that x/y > 1. Isolating x in the equation we have: x = ½ + y. We can now substitute ½ + y for x in the inequality x/y > 1 and we have:

(1/2 + y)/y > 1

(1/2)/y + y/y > 1

1/2y + 1 > 1

1/2y > 0

Thus, y must be greater than zero. Also, since x/y is greater than one, x also must be greater than zero.

Answer: C
_________________

Jeffery Miller
Head of GMAT Instruction

GMAT Quant Self-Study Course
500+ lessons 3000+ practice problems 800+ HD solutions

Expert Post
Math Revolution GMAT Instructor
User avatar
D
Joined: 16 Aug 2015
Posts: 5593
GMAT 1: 800 Q59 V59
GPA: 3.82
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jun 2016, 21:17
There are 2 variables (x and y) in the original condition. In order to match the number of variables and the number of equations, we need 2 equations. Since the condition 1) and 2) each has 1 equation, there is high chance that the correct answer is C. Using 1) and 2), from 2(x-y)=1>0 we get 2(x-y)>0, x>y. Using 2), if we multiply both sides by y^2, we get xy>y^2, xy-y^2>0, y(x-y)>0. Since x-y>0, we get y>0. From x>y>0, x>0. The answer is always yes and the condition is sufficient. Hence, the correct answer is C.



For cases where we need 2 more equations, such as original conditions with “2 variables”, or “3 variables and 1 equation”, or “4 variables and 2 equations”, we have 1 equation each in both 1) and 2). Therefore, there is 70% chance that C is the answer, while E has 25% chance. These two are the majority. In case of common mistake type 3,4, the answer may be from A, B or D but there is only 5% chance. Since C is most likely to be the answer using 1) and 2) separately according to DS definition (It saves us time). Obviously there may be cases where the answer is A, B, D or E.
Attachments

variable approach's answer probability.jpg
variable approach's answer probability.jpg [ 219.74 KiB | Viewed 2730 times ]


_________________

MathRevolution: Finish GMAT Quant Section with 10 minutes to spare
The one-and-only World’s First Variable Approach for DS and IVY Approach for PS with ease, speed and accuracy.
"Only $99 for 3 month Online Course"
"Free Resources-30 day online access & Diagnostic Test"
"Unlimited Access to over 120 free video lessons - try it yourself"

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 18 Jan 2010
Posts: 254
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jun 2016, 22:03
Manbehindthecurtain wrote:
Are x and y both positive?

(1) 2x-2y = 1
(2) x/y > 1



Statement 1
2x-2y = 1

x - y = (1/2)

x = 3/2; y = 1 ; both x and y positive

x = 1/4, y = -1/4; x is positive, y is negative

so not sufficient

Statement 2

(x/y) > 1

x = 3/2; y = 1 ; (x/y) is more than 1. both x and y positive

x = -2; y = -1 ; (x/y) is more than 1. both x and y negative

so not sufficient

Combining Statement 1 and 2

x - y = 1/2

x = y+(1/2)

x/y > 1

{y+(1/2)} / y is more than 1

1+(1/2y) > 1

(1/2y) > 0

y has to be positive. because x = y+1/2, so x also has to be positive.

C is the answer.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 01 May 2016
Posts: 2
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jan 2017, 12:47
What about the example of y=0? Then x/y is surely greater than 1, hence I chose answer E.
Expert Post
Top Contributor
CEO
CEO
User avatar
P
Joined: 12 Sep 2015
Posts: 2564
Location: Canada
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Jan 2017, 13:50
Top Contributor
1
vgmatv wrote:
What about the example of y=0? Then x/y is surely greater than 1, hence I chose answer E.


x/0 can be really big OR really small...

From my earlier post:

If we approach 0 from the positive side, then it looks like 0.5/0 is a REALLY BIG POSITIVE NUMBER
0.5/0.1 = 5
0.5/0.01 = 50
0.5/0.001 = 500
0.5/0.0001 = 5000
0.5/0.00001 = 50000
etc.

But what if we approach 0 from the NEGATIVE side:
0.5/(-0.1) = -5
0.5/(-0.01) = -50
0.5/(-0.001) = -500
0.5/(-0.0001) = -5000
0.5/(-0.00001) = -50000
Here it looks like 0.5/0 will be a REALLY BIG NEGATIVE NUMBER

This is why we say that x/0 is undefined.

Cheers,
Brent
_________________

Brent Hanneson – Founder of gmatprepnow.com

Image

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 46250
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jun 2017, 22:27
TaN1213 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Are x and y both positive?
(1) 2x-2y=1
(2) x/y>1

(1) 2x-2y=1. Well this one is clearly insufficient. You can do it with number plugging OR consider the following: x and y both positive means that point (x,y) is in the I quadrant. 2x-2y=1 --> y=x-1/2, we know it's an equation of a line and basically question asks whether this line (all (x,y) points of this line) is only in I quadrant. It's just not possible. Not sufficient.

(2) x/y>1 --> x and y have the same sign. But we don't know whether they are both positive or both negative. Not sufficient.

(1)+(2) Again it can be done with different approaches. You should just find the one which is the less time-consuming and comfortable for you personally.

One of the approaches:
\(2x-2y=1\) --> \(x=y+\frac{1}{2}\)
\(\frac{x}{y}>1\) --> \(\frac{x-y}{y}>0\) --> substitute x --> \(\frac{1}{y}>0\) --> \(y\) is positive, and as \(x=y+\frac{1}{2}\), \(x\) is positive too. Sufficient.

Answer: C.

Discussed here: http://gmatclub.com/forum/ds1-93964.htm ... approaches and also here along with other hard inequality problems: http://gmatclub.com/forum/inequality-an ... 86939.html

Hope it helps.

Hi Buñuel,

If we put x=1/2 & y=0 , would you please explain how are both statements together sufficient? Both statements hold true for these values of x and y, yet 0 is not positive.

Regards.
chris558 wrote:
Are x and y both positive?

1) 2x-2y=1
2(x-y)=1
x-y=1/2
-->3/4-1/4=1/2....YES
-->-1/4-(-3/4)=1/2...NO
INSUFFICIENT

2) x/y>1
This just means that x and y have the same sign. They're either both positive or both negative.
INSUFFICIENT

1&2)
x=1/2+y

(1/2+y)/y>1
y/2 + 1 > 1
y/2 > 0 which means that Y is greater than 0. And since both x and y have the same sign, both x and y are Positive. YES.

Answer is C.



Sent from my Redmi Note 4 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app


y cannot be 0 because in this case x/y will not be defined (division by 0 is not allowed) and not greater than 1 as given in the second statement.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Joined: 19 Mar 2014
Posts: 974
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2017, 13:36
Are x and y both positive?

(1) 2x-2y = 1

2(x-y) = 1

x-y = 1/2 = 05

Lets substitute some values and check:

x = 0.1 & y = -0.4

0.1 - (-0.4) = 0.5 ==============> Answer to the question is NO

x = 1 & y = 0.5

1 - 05 = 0.5 =================> Answer to the questions is YES

As we are getting multiple answers, Statement (1) is Not Sufficient.

(2) x/y > 1

Which means both x & y have same sing, they can be either positive or both negative.

As we are getting multiple answers, statement (2) us Not Sufficient.

Now, lets combine both (1) and (2)

we get:

x = y + 1/2

also, we know x/y>1

which means: (y+1/2)/y>1

which means y is > 0

as y>0, x has to be > 0 as well. So we can come to the conclusion that both x & y are positive.


Hence, Answer is C

_________________

"Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not: nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not: the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."

Best AWA Template: https://gmatclub.com/forum/how-to-get-6-0-awa-my-guide-64327.html#p470475

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Jan 2017
Posts: 34
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2017, 22:46
First of all, everyone should really read Bunel's earlier posts before just tagging him. He must have written the same explanation five times!

Let me try:

Statement 1:
2x - 2y =1
2*(x-y) = 1
x - y =0.5

Ok cool, but you can probably tell intuitively that a difference of 0.5 doesn't really help. X and Y could be 1 and 0.5 or 0.25 and -0.25.

So this is not really that helpful, however it was important to do this algebra because, often on DS questions, you need to see how the statements work together and simpler expressions are much easier to work with. So, always at least try and simplify stuff wherever possible as the GMAT really seems to reward that reflex.

Statement 2:
x/y > 1

This should be an immediate reaction: same sign. If you don't immediately think that, practice until you do.

Now, as Bunel mentioned, there are two approaches. Number picking and algebra. Whenever possible, I try to use algebra. It's really personal preference on a question like this, but I have a panic that goes off in my head where I am scared I am missing a potential extreme value. So I try to use algebra to avoid that feeling.

Whenever you have an equation and an inequality, you always want to substitute the equation into the inequality (the other way around is not really permitted).

Notice that it actually doesn't matter which value you isolate. Because you know x and y have the same sign, you are just trying to figure out the sign of either one of them.

equation 1: x = y + 0.5
equation 2: x/y > 1

Now you can clean up the second equation as Bunel did, or you can go straight for it.

(y + 0.5)/y > 1
y/y + 0.5/y >1
1 + 0.5/y > 1
0.5y > 0

So a positive number (0.5) multiplied by y is greater that 0. Ok so y has to be positive. And if y is positive......so is x (because statement 2 told us that).

(C)

Keep practicing everyone!
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 46250
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2018, 17:11
1
1
Are x and y both positive?


GRAPHIC APPROACH.

Notice that the question is basically asks whether the point (x, y) is in the first quadrant.


(1) \(2x - 2y = 1\). Draw line \(y=x-\frac{1}{2}\):

Image

Not sufficient.


(2) \(\frac{x}{y} > 1\). Draw line \(\frac{x}{y}=1\). The solutions is the green region:

Image

Not sufficient.


(1)+(2) Intersection is the portion of the blue line which lies in the first quadrant. Sufficient.

Answer: C.

Attachment:
graph.png
graph.png [ 6.13 KiB | Viewed 1777 times ]

Attachment:
graph %282%29.png
graph %282%29.png [ 5.95 KiB | Viewed 1782 times ]

_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Feb 2017
Posts: 21
Location: Viet Nam
GPA: 3.5
WE: General Management (Education)
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Apr 2018, 07:42
Hi everyone,

Sorry but i dont understand the condition that 1/2y > 0 so y must be positive. But i think y can also be negative because when y is negative so 2y is still positive and 1/2y > 0 anyway. Where am i wrong? Please help. Thank you so much
Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 46250
Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1 [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Apr 2018, 07:54
Hungluu92vn wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry but i dont understand the condition that 1/2y > 0 so y must be positive. But i think y can also be negative because when y is negative so 2y is still positive and 1/2y > 0 anyway. Where am i wrong? Please help. Thank you so much


For \(\frac{1}{2y}>0\) to be true y must be positive. It cannot be negative because in this case 2y = 2*negative = negative, so \(\frac{1}{2y}=\frac{1}{negative}=negative<0\).
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Re: Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1   [#permalink] 30 Apr 2018, 07:54

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 36 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Are x and y both positive? (1) 2x - 2y = 1 (2) x/y > 1

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.