It is currently 16 Aug 2017, 14:41

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchangi

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Top Contributor
4 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
B
Status: I don't stop when I'm Tired,I stop when I'm done
Joined: 11 May 2014
Posts: 568

Kudos [?]: 2034 [4] , given: 220

Location: Bangladesh
Concentration: Finance, Leadership
GPA: 2.81
WE: Business Development (Real Estate)
Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchangi [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jul 2016, 03:28
4
This post received
KUDOS
Top Contributor
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

45% (04:11) correct 55% (02:32) wrong based on 225

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

63% (01:50) correct 37% (01:21) wrong based on 216

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

36% (02:12) correct 64% (01:36) wrong based on 195

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 4
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

68% (02:12) correct 32% (00:45) wrong based on 206

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

61% (02:05) correct 39% (01:21) wrong based on 197

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

83% (01:00) correct 17% (00:54) wrong based on 190

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

71% (02:12) correct 29% (00:46) wrong based on 184

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

74% (02:13) correct 26% (00:48) wrong based on 184

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 9
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

69% (03:29) correct 31% (01:38) wrong based on 176

HideShow timer Statistics

OG V 2017 New RC
Line
    Exactly when in the early modern era Native
    Americans began exchanging animal furs with
    Europeans for European-made goods is uncertain.
    What is fairly certain, even though they left
(5)
    no written evidence of having done so, is that
    the first Europeans to conduct such trade during
    the modern period were fishing crews working the
    waters around Newfoundland. Archaeologists had
    noticed that sixteenth-century Native American
(10)
    sites were strewn with iron bolts and metal
    pins. Only later, upon reading Nicolas Denys’s
    1672 account of seventeenth-century European
    settlements in North America, did archaeologists
    realize that sixteenth-century European fishing
(15)
    crews had dismantled and exchanged parts of their
    ships for furs.
    By the time Europeans sailing the Atlantic coast
    of North America first documented the fur trade, it
    was apparently well underway. The first to record
(20)
    such trade—the captain of a Portuguese vessel
    sailing from Newfoundland in 1501—observed that a
    Native American aboard the ship wore Venetian silver
    earrings. Another early chronicler noted in 1524 that
    Native Americans living along the coast of what is now
(25)
    New England had become selective about European
    trade goods: they accepted only knives, fishhooks,
    and sharp metal. By the time Cartier sailed the Saint
    Lawrence River ten years later, Native Americans had
    traded with Europeans for more than thirty years,
(30)
    perhaps half a century.
(Book Question: 46)
The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is

[Reveal] Spoiler:
A

(Book Question: 47)
The passage suggests that which of the following is partially responsible for the difficulty in establishing the precise date when the fur trade in North America began?

A. A lack of written accounts before that of Nicolas Denys in 1672
B. A lack of written documentation before 1501
C. Ambiguities in the evidence from Native American sources
D. Uncertainty about Native American trade networks
E. Uncertainty about the origin of artifacts supposedly traded by European fishing crews for furs

[Reveal] Spoiler:
B

(Book Question: 48)
Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the author’s assertion in the first sentence of the second paragraph?

A. When Europeans retraced Cartier’s voyage in the first years of the seventeenth century, they frequently traded with Native Americans.
B. Furs from beavers, which were plentiful in North America but nearly extinct in Europe, became extremely fashionable in Europe in the final decades of the sixteenth century.
C. Firing arms were rarely found on sixteenth-century Native American sites or on European lists of trading goods since such arms required frequent maintenance and repair.
D. Europeans and Native Americans had established trade protocols, such as body language assuring one another of their peaceful intentions, that antedate the earliest records of trade.
E. During the first quarter of the sixteenth century, an Italian explorer recorded seeing many Native Americans with what appeared to be copper beads, though they may have been made of indigenous copper.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
D

(Book Question: 49)
Which of the following best describes the primary function of lines 11–16?

A. It offers a reconsideration of a claim made in the preceding sentence.
B. It reveals how archaeologists arrived at an interpretation of the evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
C. It shows how scholars misinterpreted the significance of certain evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
D. It identifies one of the first significant accounts of seventeenth-century European settlements in North America.
E. It explains why Denys’s account of seventeenth-century European settlements is thought to be significant.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
B

(Book Question: 50)
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
A

(Book Question: 51)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?

A. They had little use for decorative objects such as earrings.
B. They became increasingly dependent on fishing between 1501 and 1524.
C. By 1524, only certain groups of Europeans were willing to trade with them.
D. The selectivity of their trading choices made it difficult for them to engage in widespread trade with Europeans.
E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
E

(Book Question: 52)
The passage supports which of the following statements about sixteenth-century European fishing crews working the waters off Newfoundland?

A. They wrote no accounts of their fishing voyages.
B. They primarily sailed under the flag of Portugal.
C. They exchanged ship parts with Native Americans for furs.
D. They commonly traded jewelry with Native Americans for furs.
E. They carried surplus metal implements to trade with Native Americans for furs.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
C

(Book Question: 53)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about evidence pertaining to the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. A lack of written evidence has made it difficult to establish which Europeans first participated in this trade.
B. In general, the physical evidence pertaining to this trade has been more useful than the written evidence has been.
C. There is more written evidence pertaining to this trade from the early part of the sixteenth century than from later in that century.
D. The earliest written evidence pertaining to this trade dates from a time when the trade was already well established.
E. Some important pieces of evidence pertaining to this trade, such as Denys’s 1672 account, were long overlooked by archaeologists.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
D

(Book Question: 54)
The passage suggests which of the following about the sixteenth-century Native Americans who traded with Europeans on the coast of what is now called New England?

A. By 1524 they had become accustomed to exchanging goods with Europeans.
B. They were unfamiliar with metals before encountering Europeans.
C. They had no practical uses for European goods other than metals and metal implements.
D. By 1524 they had become disdainful of European traders because such traders had treated them unfairly in the past.
E. By 1524 they demanded only the most prized European goods because they had come to realize how valuable furs were on European markets.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
A

[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #1 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #2 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #3 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #4 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #5 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #6 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #7 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #8 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #9 OA

_________________

Md. Abdur Rakib

Please Press +1 Kudos,If it helps
Sentence Correction-Collection of Ron Purewal's "elliptical construction/analogies" for SC Challenges

Kudos [?]: 2034 [4] , given: 220

4 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jun 2016
Posts: 137

Kudos [?]: 111 [4] , given: 424

Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Technology
Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchangi [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jul 2016, 11:58
4
This post received
KUDOS
46. The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans - There was nothing mentioned about Cartier's accounts. He is cited as a fact for how long the Native Americans had been dealing with the Europeans.
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is

47. The passage suggests that which of the following is partially responsible for the difficulty in establishing the precise date when the fur trade in North America began?

A. A lack of written accounts before that of Nicolas Denys in 1672 - trap answer! this looks too good to be true and it is. We don't know if there was a lack of written accounts before Nicolas Denys.
B. A lack of written documentation before 1501 - correct, it states in line 20, "The first to record ..."
C. Ambiguities in the evidence from Native American sources - not mentioned
D. Uncertainty about Native American trade networks - not mentioned
E. Uncertainty about the origin of artifacts supposedly traded by European fishing crews for furs - not mentioned

From the second sentence you can infer the answer is between A and B.

48. Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the author’s assertion in the first sentence of the second paragraph?

A. When Europeans retraced Cartier’s voyage in the first years of the seventeenth century, they frequently traded with Native Americans.
B. Furs from beavers, which were plentiful in North America but nearly extinct in Europe, became extremely fashionable in Europe in the final decades of the sixteenth century.
C. Firing arms were rarely found on sixteenth-century Native American sites or on European lists of trading goods since such arms required frequent maintenance and repair.
D. Europeans and Native Americans had established trade protocols, such as body language assuring one another of their peaceful intentions, that antedate the earliest records of trade. -
E. During the first quarter of the sixteenth century, an Italian explorer recorded seeing many Native Americans with what appeared to be copper beads, though they may have been made of indigenous copper.

This question is referring to "By the time Europeans sailing the Atlantic coastof North America first documented the fur trade, it was apparently well underway" and only answer choice D strengthens the trade was underway.

49. Which of the following best describes the primary function of lines 11–16?

A. It offers a reconsideration of a claim made in the preceding sentence. - it is not a reconsideration
B. It reveals how archaeologists arrived at an interpretation of the evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
C. It shows how scholars misinterpreted the significance of certain evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence. - trap answer! it is not an misinterpretation, but rather how the archaeologists arrived to the answer. Be careful!
D. It identifies one of the first significant accounts of seventeenth-century European settlements in North America.
E. It explains why Denys’s account of seventeenth-century European settlements is thought to be significant.

50. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s. - Little bit of math here, 1524 was cited and then Cartier sailed 10 years later in 1534. Passage cities that trade could have started more than 30 years and maybe even 50 years (half a century) therefore that gives you 1484 as the earliest.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

51. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?

A. They had little use for decorative objects such as earrings. - Can not be inferred
B. They became increasingly dependent on fishing between 1501 and 1524. - While one may want to make this conclusion because the Native Americans only wanted to trade certain items related to fishing, this stretches it
C. By 1524, only certain groups of Europeans were willing to trade with them. - Unknown
D. The selectivity of their trading choices made it difficult for them to engage in widespread trade with Europeans. - This is a trap answer and if this is the case, then why would the trade have continued on for at least 30 years?
E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524.

Look to the connect line 25 with the rest of the passage. It is talking about the selectivity of their trading choices for a significant period of time already.

(Book Question: 52)
The passage supports which of the following statements about sixteenth-century European fishing crews working the waters off Newfoundland?

A. They wrote no accounts of their fishing voyages.
B. They primarily sailed under the flag of Portugal.
C. They exchanged ship parts with Native Americans for furs. - directly supported in lines 13-17
D. They commonly traded jewelry with Native Americans for furs.
E. They carried surplus metal implements to trade with Native Americans for furs.

(Book Question: 53)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about evidence pertaining to the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. A lack of written evidence has made it difficult to establish which Europeans first participated in this trade.
B. In general, the physical evidence pertaining to this trade has been more useful than the written evidence has been.
C. There is more written evidence pertaining to this trade from the early part of the sixteenth century than from later in that century.
D. The earliest written evidence pertaining to this trade dates from a time when the trade was already well established. - You can tie this in with the math that was already done and connect the timeline.
E. Some important pieces of evidence pertaining to this trade, such as Denys’s 1672 account, were long overlooked by archaeologists.

(Book Question: 54)
The passage suggests which of the following about the sixteenth-century Native Americans who traded with Europeans on the coast of what is now called New England?

A. By 1524 they had become accustomed to exchanging goods with Europeans. - they had been trading for at least 30 years.
B. They were unfamiliar with metals before encountering Europeans. - unknown
C. They had no practical uses for European goods other than metals and metal implements. - this seems like an attractive answer but it is a stretch to say they ha dno practical uses for other items. Maybe the metals were more in demand for Native Americans instead of others. Dunno.
D. By 1524 they had become disdainful of European traders because such traders had treated them unfairly in the past. - unknown and actually rather the opposite if they had been going strong for 30 years.
E. By 1524 they demanded only the most prized European goods because they had come to realize how valuable furs were on European markets. - can not infer this.

Kudos [?]: 111 [4] , given: 424

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 26 Aug 2016
Posts: 478

Kudos [?]: 44 [0], given: 49

Location: India
Schools: Duke '20, Tepper '20
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V33
GMAT 2: 700 Q50 V33
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchangi [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Apr 2017, 06:30
took 13 min to answer them all got 2 wrong.
:( easy passage.

Kudos [?]: 44 [0], given: 49

Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchangi   [#permalink] 11 Apr 2017, 06:30
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
5 Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging AbdurRakib 5 08 Aug 2017, 15:05
21 Experts publish their posts in the topic Prevailing scholarly opinion holds that modern science began... DensetsuNo 22 17 Jul 2017, 01:30
2 When the history of women began to receive JarvisR 8 04 Jul 2017, 20:42
6 Maps made by non-Native Americans to depict Native American land tenur Above750 17 05 May 2017, 03:01
7 Experts publish their posts in the topic When the history of women began to receive focused attention goalsnr 16 20 Jul 2017, 19:18
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchangi

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.