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Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging

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Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 28 Sep 2018, 11:43
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OG V 2017 New RC
Line
    Exactly when in the early modern era Native
    Americans began exchanging animal furs with
    Europeans for European-made goods is uncertain.
    What is fairly certain, even though they left
(5)
    no written evidence of having done so, is that
    the first Europeans to conduct such trade during
    the modern period were fishing crews working the
    waters around Newfoundland. Archaeologists had
    noticed that sixteenth-century Native American
(10)
    sites were strewn with iron bolts and metal
    pins. Only later, upon reading Nicolas Denys’s
    1672 account of seventeenth-century European
    settlements in North America, did archaeologists
    realize that sixteenth-century European fishing
(15)
    crews had dismantled and exchanged parts of their
    ships for furs.
    By the time Europeans sailing the Atlantic coast
    of North America first documented the fur trade, it
    was apparently well underway. The first to record
(20)
    such trade—the captain of a Portuguese vessel
    sailing from Newfoundland in 1501—observed that a
    Native American aboard the ship wore Venetian silver
    earrings. Another early chronicler noted in 1524 that
    Native Americans living along the coast of what is now
(25)
    New England had become selective about European
    trade goods: they accepted only knives, fishhooks,
    and sharp metal. By the time Cartier sailed the Saint
    Lawrence River ten years later, Native Americans had
    traded with Europeans for more than thirty years,
(30)
    perhaps half a century.
(Book Question: 46)
The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is now New England


(Book Question: 47)
The passage suggests that which of the following is partially responsible for the difficulty in establishing the precise date when the fur trade in North America began?

A. A lack of written accounts before that of Nicolas Denys in 1672
B. A lack of written documentation before 1501
C. Ambiguities in the evidence from Native American sources
D. Uncertainty about Native American trade networks
E. Uncertainty about the origin of artifacts supposedly traded by European fishing crews for furs


(Book Question: 48)
Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the author’s assertion in the first sentence of the second paragraph?

A. When Europeans retraced Cartier’s voyage in the first years of the seventeenth century, they frequently traded with Native Americans.
B. Furs from beavers, which were plentiful in North America but nearly extinct in Europe, became extremely fashionable in Europe in the final decades of the sixteenth century.
C. Firing arms were rarely found on sixteenth-century Native American sites or on European lists of trading goods since such arms required frequent maintenance and repair.
D. Europeans and Native Americans had established trade protocols, such as body language assuring one another of their peaceful intentions, that antedate the earliest records of trade.
E. During the first quarter of the sixteenth century, an Italian explorer recorded seeing many Native Americans with what appeared to be copper beads, though they may have been made of indigenous copper.


(Book Question: 49)
Which of the following best describes the primary function of lines 11–16?

A. It offers a reconsideration of a claim made in the preceding sentence.
B. It reveals how archaeologists arrived at an interpretation of the evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
C. It shows how scholars misinterpreted the significance of certain evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
D. It identifies one of the first significant accounts of seventeenth-century European settlements in North America.
E. It explains why Denys’s account of seventeenth-century European settlements is thought to be significant.


(Book Question: 50)
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.


(Book Question: 51)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?

A. They had little use for decorative objects such as earrings.
B. They became increasingly dependent on fishing between 1501 and 1524.
C. By 1524, only certain groups of Europeans were willing to trade with them.
D. The selectivity of their trading choices made it difficult for them to engage in widespread trade with Europeans.
E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524.


(Book Question: 52)
The passage supports which of the following statements about sixteenth-century European fishing crews working the waters off Newfoundland?

A. They wrote no accounts of their fishing voyages.
B. They primarily sailed under the flag of Portugal.
C. They exchanged ship parts with Native Americans for furs.
D. They commonly traded jewelry with Native Americans for furs.
E. They carried surplus metal implements to trade with Native Americans for furs.


(Book Question: 53)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about evidence pertaining to the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. A lack of written evidence has made it difficult to establish which Europeans first participated in this trade.
B. In general, the physical evidence pertaining to this trade has been more useful than the written evidence has been.
C. There is more written evidence pertaining to this trade from the early part of the sixteenth century than from later in that century.
D. The earliest written evidence pertaining to this trade dates from a time when the trade was already well established.
E. Some important pieces of evidence pertaining to this trade, such as Denys’s 1672 account, were long overlooked by archaeologists.


(Book Question: 54)
The passage suggests which of the following about the sixteenth-century Native Americans who traded with Europeans on the coast of what is now called New England?

A. By 1524 they had become accustomed to exchanging goods with Europeans.
B. They were unfamiliar with metals before encountering Europeans.
C. They had no practical uses for European goods other than metals and metal implements.
D. By 1524 they had become disdainful of European traders because such traders had treated them unfairly in the past.
E. By 1524 they demanded only the most prized European goods because they had come to realize how valuable furs were on European markets.



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Originally posted by AbdurRakib on 29 Jul 2016, 02:28.
Last edited by GMATNinjaTwo on 28 Sep 2018, 11:43, edited 1 time in total.
corrected choice Q1 choice E
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New post 31 Jul 2016, 10:58
7
1
46. The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans - There was nothing mentioned about Cartier's accounts. He is cited as a fact for how long the Native Americans had been dealing with the Europeans.
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is

47. The passage suggests that which of the following is partially responsible for the difficulty in establishing the precise date when the fur trade in North America began?

A. A lack of written accounts before that of Nicolas Denys in 1672 - trap answer! this looks too good to be true and it is. We don't know if there was a lack of written accounts before Nicolas Denys.
B. A lack of written documentation before 1501 - correct, it states in line 20, "The first to record ..."
C. Ambiguities in the evidence from Native American sources - not mentioned
D. Uncertainty about Native American trade networks - not mentioned
E. Uncertainty about the origin of artifacts supposedly traded by European fishing crews for furs - not mentioned

From the second sentence you can infer the answer is between A and B.

48. Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the author’s assertion in the first sentence of the second paragraph?

A. When Europeans retraced Cartier’s voyage in the first years of the seventeenth century, they frequently traded with Native Americans.
B. Furs from beavers, which were plentiful in North America but nearly extinct in Europe, became extremely fashionable in Europe in the final decades of the sixteenth century.
C. Firing arms were rarely found on sixteenth-century Native American sites or on European lists of trading goods since such arms required frequent maintenance and repair.
D. Europeans and Native Americans had established trade protocols, such as body language assuring one another of their peaceful intentions, that antedate the earliest records of trade. -
E. During the first quarter of the sixteenth century, an Italian explorer recorded seeing many Native Americans with what appeared to be copper beads, though they may have been made of indigenous copper.

This question is referring to "By the time Europeans sailing the Atlantic coastof North America first documented the fur trade, it was apparently well underway" and only answer choice D strengthens the trade was underway.

49. Which of the following best describes the primary function of lines 11–16?

A. It offers a reconsideration of a claim made in the preceding sentence. - it is not a reconsideration
B. It reveals how archaeologists arrived at an interpretation of the evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
C. It shows how scholars misinterpreted the significance of certain evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence. - trap answer! it is not an misinterpretation, but rather how the archaeologists arrived to the answer. Be careful!
D. It identifies one of the first significant accounts of seventeenth-century European settlements in North America.
E. It explains why Denys’s account of seventeenth-century European settlements is thought to be significant.

50. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s. - Little bit of math here, 1524 was cited and then Cartier sailed 10 years later in 1534. Passage cities that trade could have started more than 30 years and maybe even 50 years (half a century) therefore that gives you 1484 as the earliest.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

51. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?

A. They had little use for decorative objects such as earrings. - Can not be inferred
B. They became increasingly dependent on fishing between 1501 and 1524. - While one may want to make this conclusion because the Native Americans only wanted to trade certain items related to fishing, this stretches it
C. By 1524, only certain groups of Europeans were willing to trade with them. - Unknown
D. The selectivity of their trading choices made it difficult for them to engage in widespread trade with Europeans. - This is a trap answer and if this is the case, then why would the trade have continued on for at least 30 years?
E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524.

Look to the connect line 25 with the rest of the passage. It is talking about the selectivity of their trading choices for a significant period of time already.

(Book Question: 52)
The passage supports which of the following statements about sixteenth-century European fishing crews working the waters off Newfoundland?

A. They wrote no accounts of their fishing voyages.
B. They primarily sailed under the flag of Portugal.
C. They exchanged ship parts with Native Americans for furs. - directly supported in lines 13-17
D. They commonly traded jewelry with Native Americans for furs.
E. They carried surplus metal implements to trade with Native Americans for furs.

(Book Question: 53)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about evidence pertaining to the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. A lack of written evidence has made it difficult to establish which Europeans first participated in this trade.
B. In general, the physical evidence pertaining to this trade has been more useful than the written evidence has been.
C. There is more written evidence pertaining to this trade from the early part of the sixteenth century than from later in that century.
D. The earliest written evidence pertaining to this trade dates from a time when the trade was already well established. - You can tie this in with the math that was already done and connect the timeline.
E. Some important pieces of evidence pertaining to this trade, such as Denys’s 1672 account, were long overlooked by archaeologists.

(Book Question: 54)
The passage suggests which of the following about the sixteenth-century Native Americans who traded with Europeans on the coast of what is now called New England?

A. By 1524 they had become accustomed to exchanging goods with Europeans. - they had been trading for at least 30 years.
B. They were unfamiliar with metals before encountering Europeans. - unknown
C. They had no practical uses for European goods other than metals and metal implements. - this seems like an attractive answer but it is a stretch to say they ha dno practical uses for other items. Maybe the metals were more in demand for Native Americans instead of others. Dunno.
D. By 1524 they had become disdainful of European traders because such traders had treated them unfairly in the past. - unknown and actually rather the opposite if they had been going strong for 30 years.
E. By 1524 they demanded only the most prized European goods because they had come to realize how valuable furs were on European markets. - can not infer this.
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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 08:44
1
Can anyone explain the question 5 which is
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?
A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

Why not E? And why A?
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New post 26 Jul 2017, 09:45
1
NaeemHasan wrote:
Can anyone explain the question 5 which is
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?
A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

Why not E? And why A?



The question asks you to infer and inference is something that will not be stated explicitly in the passage. since E is stated explicitly hence E is incorrect.
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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2017, 14:05
2
NaeemHasan wrote:
Can anyone explain the question 5 which is
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?
A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

Why not E? And why A?





Another early chronicler noted in 1524 that
Native Americans living along the coast of what is now
(25) New England had become selective about European
trade goods: they accepted only knives, fishhooks,
and sharp metal. By the time Cartier sailed the Saint
Lawrence River ten years later, Native Americans had
traded with Europeans for more than thirty years,
(30) perhaps half a century.


Well if you go carefully to the passage
You can infer from these line that native americans had traded before 30 years or 50 (perhaps half a century) so these can give you insight about 1524-50 =1474(approx before 1480)
so option A
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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2017, 00:46
2
vrindachopra wrote:
Can someone explain question 3 ??


Hello vrindachopra ,

This is the statement the question is pointing to.
By the time Europeans sailing the Atlantic coast of North America first documented the fur trade, it was apparently well underway.

We have to find which out of the five statements strengthens the assertion author has made in the above statement.

Assertion : The trade was already on-going between Europeans and Americans, before the first documentation of the fur trade was done.

In strengthen questions you have to consider the statements given in the answer choices to be true.
Hence if choice D - Europeans and Native Americans had established trade protocols, such as body language assuring one another of their peaceful intentions, that antedate the earliest records of trade - is true, then we can infer that Europeans and Americans were in contact with each before any sort of documentation was done, since they had already discussed and established trade protocols.
Why would they otherwise set up trade protocols ?

I hope I have answered your question.

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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2017, 20:16
2
NaeemHasan wrote:
Can anyone explain the question 5 which is
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?
A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

Why not E? And why A?

The author claims that the fur trade was well underway by the time it was first recorded in 1501. Furthermore, the author says that by the time Cartier sailed the St. Lawrence (ten years after 1524, so 1534), Europeans may have been trading with Native Americans for a half century (50 years before 1534, so 1484). Thus, the author would agree that the trade may have begun as early as the 1480s, and choice (A) is correct.
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New post 17 Dec 2017, 06:39
The passage supports which of the following statements about sixteenth-century European fishing crews working the waters off Newfoundland?

A)They wrote no accounts of their fishing voyages.
Not mentioned: Even though there's no evidence or record found in the early stage, the author did not assert no one wrote accounts of the voyages.

B)They primarily sailed under the flag of Portugal.
Not mentioned: The author didn't mention anything about the flag.

C)They exchanged ship parts with Native Americans for furs.
Correct: The last line in the first passage directly support this one.

D)They commonly traded jewelry with Native Americans for furs.
Not mentioned: The author didn't mention anything about the jewelry trading. Though the earrings were mentioned, that is not explicitly enough.

E)They carried surplus metal implements to trade with Native Americans for furs.
Not mentioned: The author never said the metal implements are "surplus".

Please correct me if my understanding is wrong..;)
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New post 10 May 2018, 19:20
(Book Question: 51)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?

A. They had little use for decorative objects such as earrings.
B. They became increasingly dependent on fishing between 1501 and 1524.
C. By 1524, only certain groups of Europeans were willing to trade with them.
D. The selectivity of their trading choices made it difficult for them to engage in widespread trade with Europeans.
E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524.

I eliminated all answer choices, why is the answer E?
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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2018, 17:39
ENEM wrote:
(Book Question: 51)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?

A. They had little use for decorative objects such as earrings.
B. They became increasingly dependent on fishing between 1501 and 1524.
C. By 1524, only certain groups of Europeans were willing to trade with them.
D. The selectivity of their trading choices made it difficult for them to engage in widespread trade with Europeans.
E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524.

I eliminated all answer choices, why is the answer E?


Very well late on this, but let me try to answer:

Look at the line 25:

Quote:
Another early chronicler noted in 1524 that Native Americans living along the coast of what is now New England had become selective about European trade goods: they accepted only knives, fishhooks, and sharp metal.


The author tries to point out that by 1524, Native Americans had already became selective about the traded goods. This means that , in order to be selective, they must have prior knowledge of the all the available traded items. And this confirms that, they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period.
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New post 28 Sep 2018, 10:57
Dear AbdurRakib,

Kindly complete the Option E of Question 1:
Quote:
The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is

Option E should be: a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is now New England.
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New post 28 Sep 2018, 19:08
GMATYoda wrote:
Dear AbdurRakib,

Kindly complete the Option E of Question 1:
Quote:
The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is

Option E should be: a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is now New England.

Fixed! Thanks GMATYoda for bringing that to our attention. (And that's a great username!)
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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2018, 18:35
Main point - trades of fur started at what time is not clear. writtn evidences given but it started way before that. How is also given.

(Book Question: 46)
The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans- Cartier’s accounts is not defined. Cartier’s voyage is.
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements - y
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain - y
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites - y
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is now New England - y

--------------------------------------

(Book Question: 47)
The passage suggests that which of the following is partially responsible for the difficulty in establishing the precise date when the fur trade in North America began?
lack of any written doc.

B. A lack of written documentation before 1501 -
------------------------------------------
(Book Question: 48)
Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the author’s assertion in the first sentence of the second paragraph?
assertion - By the time Europeans sailing the Atlantic coast of North America first documented the fur trade, it was apparently well underway.
PT - Clearly trade was going on for some time. as this one is strengthening question, outside information is allowed. Something on the lines that trade was well established, will be good .
A. When Europeans retraced Cartier’s voyage in the first years of the seventeenth century, they frequently traded with Native Americans. --- we are talking about a different period. this time line is quiet later.
B. Furs from beavers, which were plentiful in North America but nearly extinct in Europe, became extremely fashionable in Europe in the final decades of the sixteenth century. ----- again time line is quiet later. we are talking around 1501 period.
C. Firing arms were rarely found on sixteenth-century Native American sites or on European lists of trading goods since such arms required frequent maintenance and repair. ----- Soemthing does not found>>> this will not explain the established trade.
D. Europeans and Native Americans had established trade protocols, such as body language assuring one another of their peaceful intentions, that antedate the earliest records of trade. ----- this make sense. rules of trade were defind by this time make a solid stand for established trade.
E. During the first quarter of the sixteenth century, an Italian explorer recorded seeing many Native Americans with what appeared to be copper beads, though they may have been made of indigenous copper. ----- makes a stand but time line a littile bit later, we can not say for sure any conclusion around 1501, almost a quarter century early.

-------------------------------------------------

(Book Question: 49)
Which of the following best describes the primary function of lines 11–16?

sites were strewn with iron bolts and metal
pins. Only later, upon reading Nicolas Denys’s
1672 account of seventeenth-century European
settlements in North America, did archaeologists
realize that sixteenth-century European fishing
(15)
crews had dismantled and exchanged parts of their
ships for furs.

how trade happens for fur ?
B. It reveals how archaeologists arrived at an interpretation of the evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence. - y

------------------------------------------------

(Book Question: 50)
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?
anchor - fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era

A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s. - best of the lot.

------------------------------------------------
(Book Question: 51)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?
Another early chronicler noted in 1524 that
Native Americans living along the coast of what is now
(25)
New England had become selective about European
trade goods: they accepted only knives, fishhooks,
and sharp metal.
PT - what is the observation from first record.

E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524. - best of the lot.
-------------------------------------------------

(Book Question: 52)
The passage supports which of the following statements about sixteenth-century European fishing crews working the waters off Newfoundland?
anchor - sixteenth-century European fishing crews

What is fairly certain is that the first Europeans to conduct such trade during the modern period were fishing crews working the waters around Newfoundland.

European fishing crews had dismantled and exchanged parts of their ships for furs.

A. They wrote no accounts of their fishing voyages. - no, wrote ans written by some one has diff.
B. They primarily sailed under the flag of Portugal. - no
C. They exchanged ship parts with Native Americans for furs. - yes
D. They commonly traded jewelry with Native Americans for furs. - no
E. They carried surplus metal implements to trade with Native Americans for furs. - no; surplus is not mentioned.

-----------------------------------------------------

(Book Question: 53)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about evidence pertaining to the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?
anchor - evidence pertaining to the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. A lack of written evidence has made it difficult to establish which Europeans first participated in this trade. - no
B. In general, the physical evidence pertaining to this trade has been more useful than the written evidence has been. - no comparison given.
C. There is more written evidence pertaining to this trade from the early part of the sixteenth century than from later in that century - comparison is not given.
D. The earliest written evidence pertaining to this trade dates from a time when the trade was already well established. - yes
E. Some important pieces of evidence pertaining to this trade, such as Denys’s 1672 account, were long overlooked by archaeologists. - no

-------------------------------------------------------

(Book Question: 54)
The passage suggests which of the following about the sixteenth-century Native Americans who traded with Europeans on the coast of what is now called New England?

A. By 1524 they had become accustomed to exchanging goods with Europeans. - by POE seems the best
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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2018, 06:31
AbdurRakib wrote:
OG V 2017 New RC
Line
    Exactly when in the early modern era Native
    Americans began exchanging animal furs with
    Europeans for European-made goods is uncertain.
    What is fairly certain, even though they left
(5)
    no written evidence of having done so, is that
    the first Europeans to conduct such trade during
    the modern period were fishing crews working the
    waters around Newfoundland. Archaeologists had
    noticed that sixteenth-century Native American
(10)
    sites were strewn with iron bolts and metal
    pins. Only later, upon reading Nicolas Denys’s
    1672 account of seventeenth-century European
    settlements in North America, did archaeologists
    realize that sixteenth-century European fishing
(15)
    crews had dismantled and exchanged parts of their
    ships for furs.
    By the time Europeans sailing the Atlantic coast
    of North America first documented the fur trade, it
    was apparently well underway. The first to record
(20)
    such trade—the captain of a Portuguese vessel
    sailing from Newfoundland in 1501—observed that a
    Native American aboard the ship wore Venetian silver
    earrings. Another early chronicler noted in 1524 that
    Native Americans living along the coast of what is now
(25)
    New England had become selective about European
    trade goods: they accepted only knives, fishhooks,
    and sharp metal. By the time Cartier sailed the Saint
    Lawrence River ten years later, Native Americans had
    traded with Europeans for more than thirty years,
(30)
    perhaps half a century.
(Book Question: 46)
The author of the passage draws conclusions about the fur trade in North America from all of the following sources EXCEPT

A. Cartier’s accounts of trading with Native Americans
B. a seventeenth-century account of European settlements
C. a sixteenth-century account written by a sailing vessel captain
D. archaeological observations of sixteenth-century Native American sites
E. a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans in what is now New England

(Book Question: 47)
The passage suggests that which of the following is partially responsible for the difficulty in establishing the precise date when the fur trade in North America began?

A. A lack of written accounts before that of Nicolas Denys in 1672
B. A lack of written documentation before 1501
C. Ambiguities in the evidence from Native American sources
D. Uncertainty about Native American trade networks
E. Uncertainty about the origin of artifacts supposedly traded by European fishing crews for furs

(Book Question: 48)
Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the author’s assertion in the first sentence of the second paragraph?

A. When Europeans retraced Cartier’s voyage in the first years of the seventeenth century, they frequently traded with Native Americans.
B. Furs from beavers, which were plentiful in North America but nearly extinct in Europe, became extremely fashionable in Europe in the final decades of the sixteenth century.
C. Firing arms were rarely found on sixteenth-century Native American sites or on European lists of trading goods since such arms required frequent maintenance and repair.
D. Europeans and Native Americans had established trade protocols, such as body language assuring one another of their peaceful intentions, that antedate the earliest records of trade.
E. During the first quarter of the sixteenth century, an Italian explorer recorded seeing many Native Americans with what appeared to be copper beads, though they may have been made of indigenous copper.

(Book Question: 49)
Which of the following best describes the primary function of lines 11–16?

A. It offers a reconsideration of a claim made in the preceding sentence.
B. It reveals how archaeologists arrived at an interpretation of the evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
C. It shows how scholars misinterpreted the significance of certain evidence mentioned in the preceding sentence.
D. It identifies one of the first significant accounts of seventeenth-century European settlements in North America.
E. It explains why Denys’s account of seventeenth-century European settlements is thought to be significant.

(Book Question: 50)
It can be inferred from the passage that the author would agree with which of the following statements about the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. This trade may have begun as early as the 1480s.
B. This trade probably did not continue much beyond the 1530s.
C. This trade was most likely at its peak in the mid-1520s.
D. This trade probably did not begin prior to 1500.
E. There is no written evidence of this trade prior to the seventeenth century.

(Book Question: 51)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the Native Americans mentioned in line 25?

A. They had little use for decorative objects such as earrings.
B. They became increasingly dependent on fishing between 1501 and 1524.
C. By 1524, only certain groups of Europeans were willing to trade with them.
D. The selectivity of their trading choices made it difficult for them to engage in widespread trade with Europeans.
E. The selectivity of their trading choices indicates that they had been trading with Europeans for a significant period of time prior to 1524.

(Book Question: 52)
The passage supports which of the following statements about sixteenth-century European fishing crews working the waters off Newfoundland?

A. They wrote no accounts of their fishing voyages.
B. They primarily sailed under the flag of Portugal.
C. They exchanged ship parts with Native Americans for furs.
D. They commonly traded jewelry with Native Americans for furs.
E. They carried surplus metal implements to trade with Native Americans for furs.

(Book Question: 53)
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about evidence pertaining to the fur trade between Native Americans and Europeans in the early modern era?

A. A lack of written evidence has made it difficult to establish which Europeans first participated in this trade.
B. In general, the physical evidence pertaining to this trade has been more useful than the written evidence has been.
C. There is more written evidence pertaining to this trade from the early part of the sixteenth century than from later in that century.
D. The earliest written evidence pertaining to this trade dates from a time when the trade was already well established.
E. Some important pieces of evidence pertaining to this trade, such as Denys’s 1672 account, were long overlooked by archaeologists.

(Book Question: 54)
The passage suggests which of the following about the sixteenth-century Native Americans who traded with Europeans on the coast of what is now called New England?

A. By 1524 they had become accustomed to exchanging goods with Europeans.
B. They were unfamiliar with metals before encountering Europeans.
C. They had no practical uses for European goods other than metals and metal implements.
D. By 1524 they had become disdainful of European traders because such traders had treated them unfairly in the past.
E. By 1524 they demanded only the most prized European goods because they had come to realize how valuable furs were on European markets.



It is so difficult to answer question that refers back to para or line numbers because the whole passage has been presented in a muddled way!! Am i the only to face this difficulty? please correct the para orientation!
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Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2018, 02:17
Hello

This doubt is regarding Question 1 from the passage:

The author draws inferences about the fur trade in North America from

The archaeologists’ observations about sixteenth-century Native American sites
And from their understanding derived after reading about the seventeenth-century European settlements in Denys’ narration.
The Portuguese captain’s account of 1501



Doubt :

In this question, I have not been able to understand how option E is incorrect.

Option E .a sixteenth-century account of Native Americans

Account refers to a report/description/observation of an event. 

The passage mentions that :

Another early chronicler noted in 1524 that Native Americans living along the coast of what is now New England had become selective about European trade goods: they accepted only knives, fishhooks, and sharp metal.

It explains the observation/account of an early traveller about the Native American behaviour.

The passage mentions no ACCOUNT OF NATIVE AMERICANS.



The passage also mentions:

What is fairly certain, even though they left no written evidence of having done so:

Here they refers to Native Americans and not Europeans.

So Native Americans have left no account whatsoever. The only thing we have is an observation of a early chronicler. 

Can someone please point out where I am going wrong in my understanding here?
Would really be grateful!

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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2018, 22:22
In this context, "account of" means a story reported about something. In this case, that "something" is Native Americans. It definitely does not mean an account BY Native Americans.
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Re: Exactly when in the early modern era Native Americans began exchanging &nbs [#permalink] 29 Nov 2018, 22:22
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