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GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar

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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Dec 2018, 06:59
Hello GMATNinja,
Your explanations to any of the Verbal questions are the best .I have been preparing for GMAT from quite a time now (ON & Off lately). But i have decided to prepare for it and get over it by March end. I need a lil help for someone who's preparing for it upon their own-
1)how to make a complete week-wise study plan so I have the total topics covered in sight & planned Judiciously.
2)I am looking forward to score a 720+ on GMAT and I feel i am more confident about scoring more on verbal than quant unlike Indian applicants.

Kindly Help.Thanks a Ton In advance ..Cheers!! :)
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2019, 13:22
1
GKomoku wrote:
Hello again GMAT Ninja,

OGVR-2018 Book Question: 251

As a result of record low temperatures, the water pipes on the third floor froze, which caused the heads of the sprinkler system to burst, which released torrents of water into offices on the second floor.

A. which caused the heads of the sprinkler system to burst, which released torrents of water
B. which caused the heads of the sprinkler system to burst and which released torrents of water
C. which caused the heads of the sprinkler system to burst, torrents of water were then released
D. causing the heads of the sprinkler system to burst, then releasing torrents of water
E. causing the heads of the sprinkler system to burst and release torrents of water

I need your help again.
I understand why A, B and C are wrong.
My concern is between D and E. Gramatically both of them seem correst, but the meaning is different.
Per my understanding the release of water could not happen without pior burst of sprinkler system, no burst no water release, clear. And this sequesne is clearly indicated in the orginal sentence.

I'm struggling, could you please explain me why answer choice E is correct?
Thank you for your help,

Best regards, GKomoku

You might be overthinking the sequence just a little bit. Sure: technically speaking, the sprinkler bursts before the water is released. But in reality, don’t both things happen in the blink of an eye, and appear to be simultaneous?

More importantly, it seems completely reasonable for the two actions (“burst” and “release”) to be in a parallel structure. When the water pipes froze, it caused the heads of the sprinkler system to do two things: burst and release torrents of water. Seems OK to me, since both actions were caused by the freezing of the water pipes.

Here's the full sentence again, with (D) punched in:

Quote:
(D) As a result of record low temperatures, the water pipes on the third floor froze, causing the heads of the sprinkler system to burst, then releasing torrents of water into offices on the second floor.

So what’s wrong with (D)? The use of “releasing” is confusing and problematic. “Releasing” seems to be a modifier here (and no, it’s definitely NOT a verb; more on that issue in this article), but I can’t quite figure out what it’s modifying. It’s hard for me to understand how “then releasing torrents of water” could possibly modify or describe “causing the heads of the sprinkler system to burst."

(E) is much, much clearer, since it vividly describes the two consequences that occurred when the water pipes froze. So it's our winner.

I hope this helps!
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2019, 13:52
warrior1991 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja

Sir please help me on the below solution. I am not able to understand why would is used and not will.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/gen-joseph-h ... 70243.html

Please don't lose even a moment of sleep over this question, warrior1991. It's a non-official question that has significant flaws, so please don't interpret it as a bellwether for the actual GMAT at all. Just keep moving. ;)
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2019, 14:46
Hoozan wrote:
113. Analysts blamed May’s sluggish retail sales on unexciting merchandise as well as the weather, colder and wetter than was usual in some regions, which slowed sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture.
(A) colder and wetter than was usual in some regions, which slowed
(B) which was colder and wetter than usual in some regions, slowing
(C) since it was colder and wetter than usually in some regions, which slowed
(D) being colder and wetter than usually in some regions, slowing
(E) having been colder and wetter than was usual in some regions and slowed


I chose choice B. However it took me too much time to select B cause I was confused with the usage of ,slowing

COMMA + VERB-ing is used to show some result of an action or describe the action. Please could you highlight the action which it is modifying? Also please could you highlight the doer of the modified action and that of the modifier (slowing). Since in a verb-ing modifier the doer of both the action (the modified and the modifier action is the same) I was unable to find the doer of the two

Here’s the whole sentence, with (B) inserted… and the key phrase in bold:

Quote:
Analysts blamed May’s sluggish retail sales on unexciting merchandise as well as the weather, which was colder and wetter than usual in some regions, slowing sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture.

So “the weather… was colder and wetter than usual in some regions”, right? And the result of this phrase (technically a state of being, and not an action) is that sales of grills and lawn furniture slowed.

It sounds like you might be overthinking the “doer of the action” thing. In this case, “slowing sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture” very reasonably gives us extra information about the clause “the weather… was colder and wetter than usual.” Did the weather “do” the action of slowing sales? Not exactly. But it still makes perfect sense, right?

I hope this helps!
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2019, 15:26
Huma2703 wrote:
Hi, can a sentence beginning with " WITH" in GMAT SC be correct?
What is the usage of WITH in GMAT sentence correction?

Huma2703, sorry for my slowness -- I should have tagged you when I responded to a similar question above.

Check out the bottom of this post for a brief -- and probably unsatisfying -- discussion of the word "with" on the GMAT.

And there's no rule that says that you couldn't start a sentence with the word "with." For example, it would be fine to say "I ate 400 dosas with great enthusiasm." The phrase "with great enthusiasm" just modifies the previous verb phrase, "I ate 40 dosas." But there's no reason why we couldn't flip it: "With great enthusiasm, I ate 400 dosas." I personally wouldn't choose to write the sentence that way, but technically speaking, there's nothing wrong with it -- and there are plenty of far more important things to worry about on the GMAT.

I hope this helps!
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Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 17 Jan 2019, 02:58
GMATNinja wrote:
Hoozan wrote:
113. Analysts blamed May’s sluggish retail sales on unexciting merchandise as well as the weather, colder and wetter than was usual in some regions, which slowed sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture.
(A) colder and wetter than was usual in some regions, which slowed
(B) which was colder and wetter than usual in some regions, slowing
(C) since it was colder and wetter than usually in some regions, which slowed
(D) being colder and wetter than usually in some regions, slowing
(E) having been colder and wetter than was usual in some regions and slowed


I chose choice B. However it took me too much time to select B cause I was confused with the usage of ,slowing

COMMA + VERB-ing is used to show some result of an action or describe the action. Please could you highlight the action which it is modifying? Also please could you highlight the doer of the modified action and that of the modifier (slowing). Since in a verb-ing modifier the doer of both the action (the modified and the modifier action is the same) I was unable to find the doer of the two

Here’s the whole sentence, with (B) inserted… and the key phrase in bold:

Quote:
Analysts blamed May’s sluggish retail sales on unexciting merchandise as well as the weather, which was colder and wetter than usual in some regions, slowing sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture.

So “the weather… was colder and wetter than usual in some regions”, right? And the result of this phrase (technically a state of being, and not an action) is that sales of grills and lawn furniture slowed.

It sounds like you might be overthinking the “doer of the action” thing. In this case, “slowing sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture” very reasonably gives us extra information about the clause “the weather… was colder and wetter than usual.” Did the weather “do” the action of slowing sales? Not exactly. But it still makes perfect sense, right?

I hope this helps!


Hey GMATNinja ,
Regarding,
Analysts blamed May’s sluggish retail sales on unexciting merchandise as well as the weather, colder and wetter than was usual in some regions, which slowed sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture.

Can we have a clause after than in the above case. Say for eg. one of the choices were to include than people face in arctic regions
1) Analysts blamed May’s sluggish retail sales on unexciting merchandise as well as the weather, colder and wetter than people face in arctic regions, weather that slowed sales of barbecue grills and lawn furniture.

Also in such cases is parallelism right ?
on the one side we have: colder and wetter
Other side we have a full clause: people face in arctic regions.

A similar question from veritas prep in which the correct choice reads.
2) Many newspapers across the country, forced to cope with about half as much advertising revenue as they were receiving twenty years ago, have frantically sought other sources of revenue.

I tried applying (2) in (1).

Also in 3)
A letter by Mark Twain, written in the same year as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn were published, reveals that Twain provided financial assistance to one of the first Black students at Yale Law School.
As per the experts answers on the use of "as" i understood from the post that we cannot have a clause after "as" because there is no clause before "as".
The experts also mentioned that if it were "the same year as the year in which Adventures of HF was published", then the sentence is fine. Also if the year is followed by a that the clause would stand.

From 1) 2) 3) can it be concluded that in modifiers "as" cannot be followed with clauses, but than and as X as can ? If yes, how does parallelism work in these cases.
I am not sure if i am getting too analytical but your explanation would be very helful.

Originally posted by kagrawal16 on 11 Jan 2019, 23:24.
Last edited by kagrawal16 on 17 Jan 2019, 02:58, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2019, 11:12
Sentence correction
When to use contribute and when to use contributes?

Posted from my mobile device
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2019, 04:07
1
madgmat19 wrote:
Sentence correction
When to use contribute and when to use contributes?

Posted from my mobile device


Hi,

Contribute - used when subject is plural (Eg - they contribute to the society)

Contributes - used when subject is singular (Eg - He contributes to the society)

Thanks
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2019, 05:08
GMATNinja sir,
I've got queries regarding the following question:

A group of students in an American village has been selected for testing a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity of current computer chips.

A. has been selected for testing a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity of current computer chips

B. have been selected to test a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity used by current computer chips

C. has been selected to test a new low-cost electronic notepad to be built on a new class of green microchips, which are also power-stingy and which use a fraction of the electricity used by current computer chips

D. have been selected for testing a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity of current computer chips

E. has been selected to test a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity used by current computer chips


I had selected option B instead of E for the following reasons:
'Group of students' is singular BUT 'A group of students' must be plural so 'have been' will come, isn't? On the other hand, if the question stem was either 'The group of students' or 'group of students', it would have been singular and hence we would have used 'has been'.

Where am I going wrong?


Similarly, there's another question which is confusing:

The majority of patrons of the local library, though enthusiastic about a new book mobile service, is unable, or either unwilling , to volunteer time to staff it.

A. is unable, or either unwilling
B. is either unable or unwilling
C. are unable, or either unwilling
D. are either unable or unwilling
E. are unable or unwilling, either way


I'm confused between B and D, because 'The majority' will be singular.

P.S: Sir, sorry for such long post.
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2019, 13:53
topper97 wrote:
GMATNinja sir,
I've got queries regarding the following question:

A group of students in an American village has been selected for testing a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity of current computer chips.

A. has been selected for testing a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity of current computer chips

B. have been selected to test a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity used by current computer chips

C. has been selected to test a new low-cost electronic notepad to be built on a new class of green microchips, which are also power-stingy and which use a fraction of the electricity used by current computer chips

D. have been selected for testing a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity of current computer chips

E. has been selected to test a new low-cost electronic notepad being built around a new class of green, power-stingy microchips that use a fraction of the electricity used by current computer chips


I had selected option B instead of E for the following reasons:
'Group of students' is singular BUT 'A group of students' must be plural so 'have been' will come, isn't? On the other hand, if the question stem was either 'The group of students' or 'group of students', it would have been singular and hence we would have used 'has been'.

Where am I going wrong?


Similarly, there's another question which is confusing:

The majority of patrons of the local library, though enthusiastic about a new book mobile service, is unable, or either unwilling , to volunteer time to staff it.

A. is unable, or either unwilling
B. is either unable or unwilling
C. are unable, or either unwilling
D. are either unable or unwilling
E. are unable or unwilling, either way


I'm confused between B and D, because 'The majority' will be singular.

P.S: Sir, sorry for such long post.

topper97, this probably isn't the answer you're looking for, but neither of those questions are official GMAT questions, and they're clearly of very dubious quality. As of about a decade ago, GMAC was spending somewhere between $1500 and $3000 developing each GMAT question. Even the best test-prep companies can't possibly compete with that -- and these particular questions clearly have flaws.

So just keep moving, and please don't worry about these two at all. They aren't worth even a minute of your precious study time.
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How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2019, 14:30
Shrinidhi wrote:
Hello GMATNinja,
Your explanations to any of the Verbal questions are the best .I have been preparing for GMAT from quite a time now (ON & Off lately). But i have decided to prepare for it and get over it by March end. I need a lil help for someone who's preparing for it upon their own-
1)how to make a complete week-wise study plan so I have the total topics covered in sight & planned Judiciously.
2)I am looking forward to score a 720+ on GMAT and I feel i am more confident about scoring more on verbal than quant unlike Indian applicants.

Kindly Help.Thanks a Ton In advance ..Cheers!! :)

Thank you for the kind words, @Shrindhi! Glad to hear that the explanations are helping.

I'm not sure that you're going to love my response to your questions, though. :) Honestly, there's no one-size-fits-all weekly study plan that I could recommend with a straight face. We don't even offer that sort of thing to our private students -- we basically evaluate their skills and weaknesses every week, and adapt their study plans constantly. So I can't offer a study plan that will definitely work over the next few months to achieve any specific goal for any specific person. Everybody is different, so everybody needs a different approach to their studies.

But I can recommend a few resources that might help you figure out what works best for you:


I hope this helps a bit!
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Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
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Need an expert reply?
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Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2019, 14:32
vanam52923 wrote:
Although films about the American West depict coyotes as solitary animals howling mournfully on the tops of distant hills, in reality these gregarious creatures live in stable groups that occupy the same territory for long periods.


(A) films about the American West depict coyotes as solitary animals howling mournfully on the tops of distant hills

(B) in films about the American West coyotes are depicted to be solitary animals that howl mournfully on the tops of distant hills

(C) coyotes are depicted as solitary animals howling mournfully on the tops of distant hills in films about the American West

(D) films about the American West depict coyotes as if they were solitary, mournfully howling animals on the tops of distant hills.

(E) films about the American West depict coyotes to be solitary and mournfully howling animals on the tops of distant hills

I have a query.Option C is wrong because of wrong modifier usage.
But is shift of voice also wrong here,in frst half subject is coyotes and after comma also it is these creatures only so is not this fine?

I’m not 100% sure that I’m interpreting your question correctly, but I’ll give it a shot, anyway!

When you say “shift of voice” in (C), are you talking about the passive voice used in the first half of the sentence? (C) gives us the passive phrase “coyotes are depicted as solitary animals… in films”, while (A) gives us a nice, active clause: “films… depict coyotes as solitary animals…”

It’s not WRONG, exactly, to use passive voice in this situation, but it’s also not ideal. Why not just directly say that the films depicted the coyotes in a certain way? That’s definitely better than the indirect, passive route in (C).

But as you said, (C) also has other issues, and that’s often the case in official SC questions that deal with passive vs. active voice. Passive voice isn’t strictly wrong, so it’s rarely the deciding factor on official questions – but if there isn’t a more significant decision point, then active voice is usually a better than passive voice.

I’m not sure if I addressed your question, but I hope this helps a bit, anyway!
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2019, 03:28
Hi GMATNinja


The controversy has divided the Senate, causing strains in the commission, provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”

A.causing strains in the commission, provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
B.causing strains in the commission and provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, with private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
C.caused strains in the commission, and provoked public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority and that private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
D.caused strains in the commission, provoked public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
E.caused strains in the commission, and provoked public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”

This is one of the veritas prep questions.
But I found this question difficult because I could not understand the meaning of the sentence properly.
What I understood:
The controversy divided the senate
Result:1. Led to strains in commission
2. provoked public charges and private complaints.
The subject, controversy, is responsible for the actions. Hence the actions agree with the subject.
Hence these results make sense.

SO apart from the non existing conjunction "and", I couldn't find any error in this sentence.


In option b:
that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, with private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
the "with private complaints" implies that the banking chief is overreaching his authority with private complaints.
I BELIEVE THIS IS ILLOGICAL MEANING AND NOT CHANGE IN MEANING.
HENCE THIS OPTION IS INCORRECT.

IN option C, D and E, there is a change of meaning. Now I am comfortable with a change in meaning because the other options do not make sense.
But if an option stated:

causing strains in the commission, AND provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”

Would this them be correct and preferred over the the correct option E which states that the controversy did 3 things?


Thank you in advance for your help.

Regards
Nitesh
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2019, 05:26
Hi GMATNinja

Insufficiently trained for combat, the soldier was grievously injured in battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, anesthetized by the medicine required by the many rounds of surgery necessary to save his badly wounded leg.

a) battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, anesthetized by
b) battle, sank once again into unconsciousness, and anesthetized
c) battle, sinking once again into unconsciousness, was anesthetized by
d) battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, and was anesthetized
e) battle, sinking once again into unconsciousness and being anesthetized by

This is again one of those questions that have really confused me.
An Verbed modifier may modify the preceding clause but it must make sense with the subject.

The correct option:
the process I use is I ask a question: who is responsible for action of "verb ed" modifier.

in Option A anesthetized by modifies the action sank.
It present the action of WHY.
But it doesnot make sense with the subject.
Who is responsible for the action of anesthizing: The medicine not Soldier.
Hence I feel the Choice A is not the answer.

Can you please give me some examples of Verb-ed modifier modifying the preceding clause?
And what is wrong in my reasoning in this question.


Looking forward to your reply.
Thank you for your time.

Regards
Nitesh
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2019, 08:50
1
saurabh9gupta wrote:
hi gmatninja and mikemcgarry
i am having issues understanding the usage of
1. being
2. having

what is the correct usage?

saurabh9gupta, I might be too late to be useful for you, but there’s a full article about the use of being here. And you can read a lengthy discussion about “having” in this post.

Sorry for my slowness, and I hope that these help!
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2019, 09:02
GMATNinja

No you are not late.
I was hopeful that you will reply

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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2019, 10:14
1
Sorry saurabh9gupta, I should have answered this with the last one:
saurabh9gupta wrote:
1. Noun + preposition + participial... is this wrong on the gmat?

Honestly, I’ve never spent even a moment thinking about that construction (until now, anyway!), and I can't think of a reason why noun + preposition + participle would be wrong.

It doesn’t seem like something worth worrying about, but for whatever it’s worth, I can't think of a correct usage of it. (Though there are plenty of cases when you would use noun + preposition + gerund, which looks like the same thing. There's nothing wrong with the phrase "a champion in swimming" or "the pain of studying excessively" -- but in both cases, the "-ing" word is functioning as a noun, so it's a gerund, and not a participle.)

Actually, I'm not even sure why it would be a concern, and that probably means that I'm failing to think of an example of it that appears on the GMAT. Do you have something specific in mind? If so, let me know. Otherwise, it doesn't seem like the sort of thing that's worth losing sleep over...
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2019, 10:35
nitesh50 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja

Insufficiently trained for combat, the soldier was grievously injured in battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, anesthetized by the medicine required by the many rounds of surgery necessary to save his badly wounded leg.

a) battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, anesthetized by
b) battle, sank once again into unconsciousness, and anesthetized
c) battle, sinking once again into unconsciousness, was anesthetized by
d) battle and sank once again into unconsciousness, and was anesthetized
e) battle, sinking once again into unconsciousness and being anesthetized by

This is again one of those questions that have really confused me.
An Verbed modifier may modify the preceding clause but it must make sense with the subject.

The correct option:
the process I use is I ask a question: who is responsible for action of "verb ed" modifier.

in Option A anesthetized by modifies the action sank.
It present the action of WHY.
But it doesnot make sense with the subject.
Who is responsible for the action of anesthizing: The medicine not Soldier.
Hence I feel the Choice A is not the answer.

Can you please give me some examples of Verb-ed modifier modifying the preceding clause?
And what is wrong in my reasoning in this question.


Looking forward to your reply.
Thank you for your time.

Regards
Nitesh

This is a non-official question, so please don't spend too much time worrying about the specifics. But I think the sentence is defensible. If we strip it down a bit, we have: "the soldier... sank into unconsciousness, anesthetized by the medicine..." "Anesthetized" describes the soldier, right? He was the one that was actually "anesthetized by the medicine", and it's giving us more information about what happened when he sank into unconsciousness. Logically, that seems absolutely fine to me.

For more on "-ed" words, check out this article.

I hope this helps!
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2019, 14:57
nitesh50 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja
The controversy has divided the Senate, causing strains in the commission, provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”

A.causing strains in the commission, provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
B.causing strains in the commission and provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, with private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
C.caused strains in the commission, and provoked public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority and that private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
D.caused strains in the commission, provoked public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
E.caused strains in the commission, and provoked public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”

This is one of the veritas prep questions.
But I found this question difficult because I could not understand the meaning of the sentence properly.
What I understood:
The controversy divided the senate
Result:1. Led to strains in commission
2. provoked public charges and private complaints.
The subject, controversy, is responsible for the actions. Hence the actions agree with the subject.
Hence these results make sense.

SO apart from the non existing conjunction "and", I couldn't find any error in this sentence.


In option b:
that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, with private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”
the "with private complaints" implies that the banking chief is overreaching his authority with private complaints.
I BELIEVE THIS IS ILLOGICAL MEANING AND NOT CHANGE IN MEANING.
HENCE THIS OPTION IS INCORRECT.

IN option C, D and E, there is a change of meaning. Now I am comfortable with a change in meaning because the other options do not make sense.
But if an option stated:

causing strains in the commission, AND provoking public charges by industry officials that the banking chief is overreaching his authority, and private complaints that he is “reckless” and “stubborn.”

Would this them be correct and preferred over the the correct option E which states that the controversy did 3 things?

I'll start with the same comment as in my last post on this thread: this is a non-official question, and non-official questions aren't generally worth your precious study time for verbal. They're fine for quant, but will eventually lead you astray on verbal.

And in this particular case? Honestly, I don't think it's worth your time at all. For a vaguely similar issue, you might check out this classic question about a sloth.
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Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2019, 03:57
Hoozan wrote:
95. Although some officials noted that using machines for farming in China costs more than traditional hand cultivation, the mechanization of farming in the village of Long Bow doubled the corn yield while the previous year’s costs were cut in half.

(A) mechanization of farming in the village of Long Bow doubled the corn yield while the previous year’s costs were cut in half
(B) mechanization of farming in the village of Long Bow doubled the corn yield while cutting costs to half those of the previous year

(C) mechanization of farming in the village of Long Bow doubled the corn yield as cost were cut to half of the previous year’s
(D) farming mechanization in the village of Long Bow doubled the corn yield as it cut in half the previous year’s costs
(E) farming mechanization in the village of Long Bow doubled the corn yield while costs were cut to half that of the previous year


Please could you help me understand this SC

A- is wrong because its talking about cutting previous years costs
C- the use of "as" instead of "while" is incorrect.
D- the use of "as" instead of "while" is incorrect
E- "that" is incorrect. It should be "those"

left with B. But I find B too wordy.

“Too wordy” is not a great reason to eliminate answer choices, just because it’s completely subjective. So is “awkwardness.” Yes, the OGs use those terms in their explanations, but those explanations are written by random contractors who work for Wiley, often a decade or two after the original questions were written.

It’s much better to focus on errors of grammar, usage, or meaning; more on that in this article and this video.

And notice that you got to the right answer by focusing on other issues! That’s exactly what you should expect if you’re being sharp about grammar and meaning, and ignoring any subjective worries about “wordiness” or “awkwardness.”

Hoozan wrote:
Moreover I wanted to understand the usage of cost and the following verb.

Costs (singular) will use the (Singular) verb was? While Cost (plural) will take the plural verb (were)

Somewhere in the forum I saw the opposite explanation given.

eg- The car costs be $10,000. Here car is singular subject and costs is singular verb
eg- The hotel rooms cost be $2000 per night plural subject- rooms. Plural verb- cost

Please correct me in my understanding

Unfortunately, nothing in this part of your post looks correct. “The car costs be $10,000” and “the hotel rooms cost be $2000” are spectacularly incorrect sentences.

I’m not exactly sure what the disconnect is, but are you confused about the fact that the word “cost” could function as either a noun or a verb?

As a noun:
  • The cost of pickles is already too high in Ukraine. → “cost” is a singular noun, and requires a singular verb (“is”)
  • The costs associated with a government shutdown are often underestimated. → “costs” is a plural noun, and requires a plural verb (“are”)

As a verb:
  • Pickles cost more than underwear in many developed countries. → “cost” is a verb… plural in this case, since the subject, “pickles”, is plural
  • Underwear costs more than coffee at Japanese vending machines. → “costs” is a verb… singular in this case, because the subject, “underwear”, is singular

Does that help at all? I think it’s the only thing that could explain the issues you brought up, but I could be wrong.
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