GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Jun 2019, 01:54

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
CR Forum Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 25 Apr 2018
Posts: 570
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Mar 2019, 08:49
Hi GMATNinja

https://gmatclub.com/forum/studies-have ... l#p1381410

Can you please help in understanding how choice A is correct in the above link
_________________
Please give kudos if you found my posts helpful!

Project CR Butler - 2 CR's everyday
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jul 2018
Posts: 12
Location: India
Schools: ISB
GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Apr 2019, 09:07
Hi GMATNinja ,

I am stuck at V28 and my major issue is that I take approx. 2-3 mins on a difficult SC question (Your advice on CR and RC has really worked for me and really appreciate the videos you have put up on YouTube. They are truly GMAT gold). However, I have just 9 days left for my test, I have been following your advice from the youtube videos on SC but on my mocks I end up taking almost 2mins per SC question which leads to a time crunch in the second half of my test and I end up getting 5-6 incorrect in a row. What would you propose the best course of action would be now? Since the past 2 weeks I am solving all official questions for the second time and on an average I solve 20SC, 20CR and 2 RC passages a day. Should I continue this? What can I do more? I know I cannot magically improve to V40+, but I am targetting a V35.

GMATNinja wrote:
Turkish wrote:
Hello Charles,

Can you tell us how to increase Speed and Accuracy in SC ?

Turkish -- and anybody else who has this same question -- I've added some links to the original post above. To be honest, there's no easy answer to the epic question you just asked, but those links are about the best we can do in a forum post or a video. I hope they help a bit!
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Mar 2015
Posts: 87
Location: India
GMAT 1: 640 Q49 V28
GPA: 3.1
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2019, 21:11
hi i have a question regarding subjunctive verbs.

is there any clear cut rule when to use be+verb

for ex

The authorities from the flood affected states requested that help be provided to their people at the earliest.


whereases

the Non-Proliferation Treaty requires that a nation prevent the spread of nuclear weapons.


both the sentences are correct. but i am not able to find out when we must use "Be"
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 May 2019, 10:51
rish2708 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja Sir,

I have a small doubt here:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/in-constant- ... 13399.html

What's the difference between:

In constant dollars, New York City taxpayers spend three times more than(they did) ten years ago to receive the same level of municipal services.
AND
In constant dollars, New York City taxpayers spend three times more than they did ten years ago to receive the same level of municipal services.

I knew that if we omit words and meaning is apparent we must choose the option which is more concise. Then how come are we neglecting A?
Could you please help me regarding the correct usage here?

Regards,
Rishav

Great question! You're right that given the choice between two equally logical, grammatically correct sentences, we'd prefer the more concise construction, but clarity is a whole lot more important than concision.

To see why, take a simple example:

    "In 2018 the Boston Celtics won more games than they won in 2019."

Here, we're comparing how many games the Celtics won in 2018 to how many games they won in 2019. Perfectly logical comparison.

I could also write the sentence this way:

    "In 2018 the Boston Celtics won more games than in 2019."

Because the prepositional phrase "in 2018" is modifying the succeeding clause and telling us when that action took place, it stands to reason that "in 2019" is doing exactly the same thing, so it's clear that we're still comparing how many games the team won in one year to how many games they won in another, even though I've removed the phrase "they won." Still a good comparison.

And while the GMAT would be unlikely to ask you to choose between this sentence and the previous one, I like that this one is shorter.

But watch what happens when I shorten the sentence to this:

    "In 2018 the Boston Celtics won more games than 2019."

You can probably figure out what the sentence intends to convey, but there's a moment of confusion when we see "more than 2019." Wait, the Celtics won more than 2019 games!? (They have far too many chemistry issues to do that.) Because we've now shortened the sentence so much that it's become less clear, this construction is inferior to the previous two.

Same issue in your example. When I see the phrase "three times more than ten," I get tripped up and have to double back and re-read it to make sense of the sentence. But when I see "three times more than they did," the meaning is crystal-clear, and so this version is preferable.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 May 2019, 11:57
1
akrockheartz19 wrote:
Hi, Charles (GMAT Ninja)

I have been following your blogs and watched a few of your videos on Sentence Correction. It has been very helpful. In one of your videos, you talked about how we should start looking for obvious errors first.

Now, the problem I have is, once I start working on an SC problem, my brain goes blank. I end up wasting the first 30 seconds just figuring out what the sentence is talking about and what the errors might be.
I have an accuracy of >80% on Official problems (mixed difficulty level) but I have a hard time in articulating why I am eliminating certain options. As much as I try to avoid, my reasoning comes down to – this sounds good.

Another byproduct of this problem is, I am never confident in my answer selection and end up second guessing myself before I click next.

Any suggestions on what I can do to improve my thought process and have more confidence in selecting the answer?

Thanks,
-
A

Glad you've found the videos helpful!

First, any time you spend reading the sentence and scanning for errors isn't wasted - that's exactly what you're supposed to do! You do, however, want to make sure you're proceeding efficiently, and how you'll do this will be somewhat question dependent. Take three simple common scenarios.

1) You read the initial sentence and an error pops out at you. Awesome! Scan the answer choices and eliminate every option that contains the same error. Easy enough.

2) You read the initial sentence, and while no error pops out at you, you do detect a structural clue indicating what a potential issue might be. For example, if you see the word "which" you'd want to consider what "which" is modifying, and eliminate every option that has an illogical modifier. If you see the word "and," you'd want to consider parallelism, and eliminate every sentence with a faulty parallel construction. And so on.

3) You don't see an obvious error and you don't see a structural clue indicating a potential issue. In this case, you'd likely go to the answer choices in search of splits or decision points. If, for instance, three options contain a singular verb and two contain a plural verb, some of the answers will have subject-verb disagreement and can be eliminated.

Worst case scenario - you read the answer choices one by one, noting differences as you go.

The more practice you get, the better you'll become at recognizing patterns and developing an instinctive sense for where you want to focus your attention.

I hope that helps a little bit!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 May 2019, 12:35
3
1
divyajeswani wrote:
Hi GMATNinja ,

I am stuck at V28 and my major issue is that I take approx. 2-3 mins on a difficult SC question (Your advice on CR and RC has really worked for me and really appreciate the videos you have put up on YouTube. They are truly GMAT gold). However, I have just 9 days left for my test, I have been following your advice from the youtube videos on SC but on my mocks I end up taking almost 2mins per SC question which leads to a time crunch in the second half of my test and I end up getting 5-6 incorrect in a row. What would you propose the best course of action would be now? Since the past 2 weeks I am solving all official questions for the second time and on an average I solve 20SC, 20CR and 2 RC passages a day. Should I continue this? What can I do more? I know I cannot magically improve to V40+, but I am targetting a V35.

Sorry that I'm probably too late to helpful on this, divyajeswani! I think your test is... tomorrow?

It doesn't sound like you're looking for one, but just to be safe: there's no quick fix for verbal timing problems. All you can do is learn to be as efficient as you can, and then when you run out of time, you have no choice but to guess your way through the rest of them. More on that in this crusty old post.

The only real solution is simply to get more efficient at everything, and that's not usually something that happens quickly. On SC, it's possible that you're slow to notice straightforward, obvious opportunities to eliminate answer choices. It's also possible that you're just not a very fast reader, and maybe it takes you too long to sift through the meaning issues in SC questions. In either case, there's probably no quick fix that will move the needle in just a week or two. (And again, I realize that you have only hours left, not weeks.)

I wish that I could offer more! But it's really hard for me to know exactly why your speed is so slow, and really hard to recommend a course of action.

One last thought: if you have to guess on the final 5-6 questions, that's not going to destroy your chances for a 35+ on verbal. If you truly take care of business on the first ~30 questions, it would absolutely be possible for you to get into the mid-30s. Something in the 40s would almost certainly be out of reach, but the timing issues, by themselves, won't ruin your chances at a 35V.

Good luck on your exam, and sorry that I can't be more useful on this!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jul 2018
Posts: 12
Location: India
Schools: ISB
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 May 2019, 02:23
GMATNinja wrote:
divyajeswani wrote:
Hi GMATNinja ,

I am stuck at V28 and my major issue is that I take approx. 2-3 mins on a difficult SC question (Your advice on CR and RC has really worked for me and really appreciate the videos you have put up on YouTube. They are truly GMAT gold). However, I have just 9 days left for my test, I have been following your advice from the youtube videos on SC but on my mocks I end up taking almost 2mins per SC question which leads to a time crunch in the second half of my test and I end up getting 5-6 incorrect in a row. What would you propose the best course of action would be now? Since the past 2 weeks I am solving all official questions for the second time and on an average I solve 20SC, 20CR and 2 RC passages a day. Should I continue this? What can I do more? I know I cannot magically improve to V40+, but I am targetting a V35.

Sorry that I'm probably too late to helpful on this, divyajeswani! I think your test is... tomorrow?

It doesn't sound like you're looking for one, but just to be safe: there's no quick fix for verbal timing problems. All you can do is learn to be as efficient as you can, and then when you run out of time, you have no choice but to guess your way through the rest of them. More on that in this crusty old post.

The only real solution is simply to get more efficient at everything, and that's not usually something that happens quickly. On SC, it's possible that you're slow to notice straightforward, obvious opportunities to eliminate answer choices. It's also possible that you're just not a very fast reader, and maybe it takes you too long to sift through the meaning issues in SC questions. In either case, there's probably no quick fix that will move the needle in just a week or two. (And again, I realize that you have only hours left, not weeks.)

I wish that I could offer more! But it's really hard for me to know exactly why your speed is so slow, and really hard to recommend a course of action.

One last thought: if you have to guess on the final 5-6 questions, that's not going to destroy your chances for a 35+ on verbal. If you truly take care of business on the first ~30 questions, it would absolutely be possible for you to get into the mid-30s. Something in the 40s would almost certainly be out of reach, but the timing issues, by themselves, won't ruin your chances at a 35V.

Good luck on your exam, and sorry that I can't be more useful on this!


Hey GMATNinja thank you for replying on this. I got a V28 on my test. I am planning to retake in July. I have to concentrate on my reading skills, clearly that was the root of all my problems. Aiming to get a 40+ this time around.

Btw, I noticed a pattern on my GMATPrep mocks that questions from 30-36 were relatively easy, so wouldn't guessing on the last 5-6 easy questions tank my score?
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2019, 00:03
divyajeswani wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
divyajeswani wrote:
Hi GMATNinja ,

I am stuck at V28 and my major issue is that I take approx. 2-3 mins on a difficult SC question (Your advice on CR and RC has really worked for me and really appreciate the videos you have put up on YouTube. They are truly GMAT gold). However, I have just 9 days left for my test, I have been following your advice from the youtube videos on SC but on my mocks I end up taking almost 2mins per SC question which leads to a time crunch in the second half of my test and I end up getting 5-6 incorrect in a row. What would you propose the best course of action would be now? Since the past 2 weeks I am solving all official questions for the second time and on an average I solve 20SC, 20CR and 2 RC passages a day. Should I continue this? What can I do more? I know I cannot magically improve to V40+, but I am targetting a V35.

Sorry that I'm probably too late to helpful on this, divyajeswani! I think your test is... tomorrow?

It doesn't sound like you're looking for one, but just to be safe: there's no quick fix for verbal timing problems. All you can do is learn to be as efficient as you can, and then when you run out of time, you have no choice but to guess your way through the rest of them. More on that in this crusty old post.

The only real solution is simply to get more efficient at everything, and that's not usually something that happens quickly. On SC, it's possible that you're slow to notice straightforward, obvious opportunities to eliminate answer choices. It's also possible that you're just not a very fast reader, and maybe it takes you too long to sift through the meaning issues in SC questions. In either case, there's probably no quick fix that will move the needle in just a week or two. (And again, I realize that you have only hours left, not weeks.)

I wish that I could offer more! But it's really hard for me to know exactly why your speed is so slow, and really hard to recommend a course of action.

One last thought: if you have to guess on the final 5-6 questions, that's not going to destroy your chances for a 35+ on verbal. If you truly take care of business on the first ~30 questions, it would absolutely be possible for you to get into the mid-30s. Something in the 40s would almost certainly be out of reach, but the timing issues, by themselves, won't ruin your chances at a 35V.

Good luck on your exam, and sorry that I can't be more useful on this!


Hey GMATNinja thank you for replying on this. I got a V28 on my test. I am planning to retake in July. I have to concentrate on my reading skills, clearly that was the root of all my problems. Aiming to get a 40+ this time around.

Btw, I noticed a pattern on my GMATPrep mocks that questions from 30-36 were relatively easy, so wouldn't guessing on the last 5-6 easy questions tank my score?

Sorry to hear the bad news about the exam result! But great to hear that you're still going at it. :)

Two quick thoughts on this:

  • Difficulty levels are determined empirically by the GMAT -- that's exactly what "experimental" questions are for. So just because a question looks easy to you may or may not mean that's it's actually rated as difficult by the exam. These things are very, very deceptive. So please don't EVER try to determine the difficulty levels of questions when you're taking the GMAT, because it's a complete waste of your time, and you'll often be very wrong about it. (The GMAT Club difficulty ratings, incidentally, are determined using a completely different algorithm than the actual exam. They're nice to have, but they aren't generally accurate, either.)
  • I'll stand by what I said before: if you take care of business on the first ~30 questions, those last six will actually be difficult. Right now, you're getting your butt kicked by the first 30, so of course the last half-dozen are relatively easy. If you scramble to save time for the last six questions -- and miss a bunch of easier questions along the way -- it'll just make the problem worse: the end of the test will be even easier, and your low score will be even harder to change.

So again, there are no timing gimmicks that can help on verbal, unfortunately. The only real path forward is to get better and more efficient in general. The bottom line is that you need to get more of the first 30 questions right -- and you also need to get more efficient so that you can actually answer some of the final six questions. But the former is still far more important than the latter.

I hope this helps!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Nov 2018
Posts: 13
CAT Tests
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2019, 00:16
1
Hi GMATNinja,

I am preparing myself for the test 45 days from now. I am trying to solve all the highly bookmarked questions in gmatclub and learning from them.
Most of my 700 level get wrong in the first shot as every question brings with it something new to learn. But how long is this going to happen is my worry? I can't keep on doing this research forever. I know theoretical concepts very well and confident in that. It's the application of them which is an issue for now.
Anything you would like to suggest for this situation?

This will be my second attempt with v28 Q48 in the first chance.

Aiming for v35+ atleast.

Posted from my mobile device
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2019, 00:28
rish2708 wrote:
Hi GMATNinja ( Charles),
Thanks for opening this forum.
I am struggling with usage of dashes in two questions I encountered in OG.

Links:
Q1) https://gmatclub.com/forum/some-anthrop ... 34793.html
Q2) https://gmatclub.com/forum/although-app ... 32487.html

Now here in Q1) we use that after the dash, however, I feel that the dash part modifies bottleneck and usage of that seems illogical.
--> Reading the answers it seems that the dash establishes a link and thus that is required to maintain parallelism.
Could you please help explain how are we saying that usage of dash requires "that"

And if we say that since dash is used as a conjunction then why do we not use dash + that in Q2 ?

Waiting for the response.

Regards,
Rishav

For starters, I wouldn’t worry much about dashes. Grammar and style experts disagree about when it’s appropriate to use dashes, and I’ve seen no evidence that the GMAT is trying to test us on the “rules” for dash uses. Which is good, because there arguably aren’t any rules for dashes that are universally accepted.

In other words: the GMAT will never test you on the nuances of dash usage. So you should ALWAYS look for other decision points if you see a dash in the answer choices. (More on punctuation in general in this video.)

We can’t really say that dashes are specifically used as conjunctions (a conjunction is a word; punctuation is not), or that the usage of a dash always requires “that.” Most of the time, dashes just set aside some sort of modifier, and modifiers can take all sorts of forms.

Here’s the original sentence for the 2nd question you mentioned:
Quote:
Although appearing less appetizing than most of their round and red supermarket cousins, heirloom tomatoes, grown from seeds saved during the previous year—they are often green and striped, or have plenty of bumps and bruises—heirlooms are more flavorful and thus in increasing demand.

Notice that the dashes aren’t even underlined! They’re 100% irrelevant to us, since they appear in all five answer choices.

But what are the dashes doing? Well, they almost act like parentheses here. The author has a little bit more to say about heirloom tomatoes, and wants to imbed an additional clause in the middle of the sentence. But since it’s an incidental comment, it’s surrounded by dashes. Fair enough.

But again: who cares? The dashes aren’t underlined!

For the question in link #1, try ignoring the dash completely, and see if that allows you to arrive at the correct answer. I see clear errors – mostly related to meaning – in four answer choices. The fifth happens to begin with a “that” after the dash, but we don’t actually need to worry about that issue to get the question right.

And I’m not sure that the use of “that” is absolutely necessary in the correct answer. I’d be OK without it, to be honest. But you could argue that it helps the clarity a little bit, since the phrase starting with “that” is just another thing that the anthropologists believe: “Some anthropologists believe… that at some time in the past our ancestors suffered an event…”

But again, I wouldn't overthink it. There are more important decision points than the presence or absence of “that” after the dash.

Bottom line: you can basically ignore dashes, since the GMAT never really seems to test us on the correct use of dashes. Always look for other decision points first.

I hope this helps a bit!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2019, 00:32
abalogh1026 wrote:
Hi Charles,

Generally speaking, was wondering if you can advise as to whether verbs in the perfect or progressive tense can ever be parallel to verbs in the simple tenses?

Really appreciate your feedback in advance.

Yup, there’s really no reason why we couldn’t have different verb tenses in the same parallel construction, as long as the timeline actually makes sense. I can't think of any official GMAT sentences that happen to mix a simple tense with a perfect or progressive tense, but there's no reason why you couldn't.

After all, we mix past, present, and future verbs regularly in sentences, right? For example:

    ”Amber studied ballet as a child, studies Pilates now, and will study cooking someday so that she can aid her husband’s quest to weigh as much as an aircraft carrier.”

I could change one of them to, say, perfect perfect tense (“has studied”), and that’s fine too:

    ”Amber studied ballet as a child, has studied Pilates since 2014, and will study cooking someday so that she can aid her husband’s quest to oink incessantly.”

Bottom line: as long as the logic of the timeline makes sense, there’s no problem mixing tenses in the same parallel construction.

I hope this helps!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2019, 00:37
1
1
Quote:
Could you please help me explain more the usage of "each other", "another" and "the other" in this official question?

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.
(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

I have read the OG explanation, as well as explanation for this question from this thread https://gmatclub.com/forum/among-the-ts ... 41546.html but I'm not quite sure whether I understand exactly their difference.

Here is what I think:

1. There are only 2 definite objects or people in a group. If 1 object is already mentioned, "the other" will be used to refer to the second object. On the other hand, when there are more than 2 objects, "another" will be used to refer to any other objects in this group.

2. "each other" is used when there are at least 2 objects or people in a group.
For example:
My friend, Nicole and I exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas
Our group exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas
However, I can't distinguish between the usage of "each other" and "another" because it seems to me that "another" can be used to replace "each other" in "our group" example above

Please correct me. Thank you very much!

Ooh, good question, Samine. I'm not sure that you’ll ever see this particular issue again in an actual GMAT question, but it’s oddly interesting. My first instinct was that your explanations were spot-on, and it took me a while to figure out what was missing.

You’re right that the term “each other” would be used when there are at least 2 objects or people in a group. But the thing you’re missing is that “each other” suggests that everybody in the group is performing the same, reciprocal action. Using your examples:

    “My friend, Nicole and I exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas.” – You and Nicole BOTH perform the action of exchanging gifts.
    “[Everybody in] our group exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas.” – EVERYBODY in the group performs the action of exchanging gifts.

Back to answer choice (A) from the OG question:

Quote:
Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.
(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

(A) doesn’t quite make sense. “Each other” has to refer to “dance teams”, right? So then the sentence seems to say that dance teams represent their own chief at the court of other dance teams. And that’s pretty weird: have you ever heard of a dance team with its own royal court?

(Speaking as a veteran of quite a few dance companies: we were lucky if the dance company had its own dressing room, let alone a royal court. Once, I had to change costumes 17 times during a single show – and had to do the costume changes in a hallway. I am not making this up. There were also some very interesting wardrobe malfunctions on opening night, but you really don't want to hear about my accidental moments of near-nudity in front of live audiences…)

Anyway, (B) seems clearer: “another” can now refer to a chief, instead of a dance team. So now that makes sense: “dance teams represent their own chief at the court of another chief.” Nice.

And (C) is odd, too: “the other” suggests that there’s only one other chief, or one other dance team. Neither of those quite work: “dance teams represent their own chief at the court of the other chief…”? Which other chief? Or if it’s “dance teams represent their own chief at the court of the other dance team”, that’s still weird: which other dance team are we talking about?

So for that reason, (B) seems to be the best of the three.

I hope this helps!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2019, 00:45
shubham2312 wrote:
hi i have a question regarding subjunctive verbs.

is there any clear cut rule when to use be+verb

for ex

The authorities from the flood affected states requested that help be provided to their people at the earliest.


whereases

the Non-Proliferation Treaty requires that a nation prevent the spread of nuclear weapons.


both the sentences are correct. but i am not able to find out when we must use "Be"

I'm not 100% sure that I'm interpreting your question correctly. If it’s a general question about when to use subjunctive verbs, check out this post or maybe this post, and see if those help at all.

Or are you asking how the word “be” is related to the subjunctive form of a verb? “Be” is just the subjunctive form of the verb “to be.” Here, check out your own examples again:

  • ”The Non-Proliferation Treaty requires that a nation prevent the spread of nuclear weapons.” – “prevent” is the subjunctive form of “to prevent”, formed by removing the word “to.”
  • “The authorities from the flood affected states requested that help be provided to their people [as quickly as possible].” – “be“ is the subjunctive form of “to be”, formed by removing the word “to”.

So there’s no special relationship between “be” and the subjunctive, if that’s what you’re asking.

I’m not sure if I’m answering your question, but I hope this helps somebody out there!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2019, 03:16
kagrawal16 wrote:
Sir Charles GMATNinja

Please guide with the below 2 perplexing questions.

1) The gyrfalcon, an arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than what they were when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.

(A) its numbers are now five times greater than what they were when
(B) its numbers now fivefold what they were when
(C) its numbers now five times more than when
(D) now with fivefold the numbers it had when
(E) now with its numbers five greater since
Ans(A)

2) The gyrfalcon, an Arctic bird of prey, has survived a close brush with extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than when the use of DDT was sharply restricted in the early 1970's.

(A) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than
(B) extinction; its numbers are now five times more than
(C) extinction, their numbers now fivefold what they were
(D) extinction, now with fivefold the numbers they had
(E) extinction; its numbers are now five times greater than what they were
Ans (A)

I have read explanations on both of them and had a few questions.

Before I say anything else: I’m not sure that the first one is legit! Question #2 is pretty close to the official version that appears in the verbal guide. I don’t know what’s up with that first one – it looks like some random person did some creative editing, and unless I’m missing something, I don’t think GMAC actually created that version, and I really don’t think (A) would be the right answer to it.

So unless somebody can verify the source, I’m going to completely ignore the first version you posted, because I really don’t think it’s correct.

Quote:
1) Am I right to say that What they were is a clause that represents numbers – Substantive clause – (what the numbers were..)

2) From the point of view of parallelism are nouns – numbers in this case – parallel to substantive clauses.
3) From the comparison point of view, please suggest whether below are correct:
a.) Its numbers are now five times greater than “they were” when …
Is it right to drop the “they were” in Q2 when the tense changes – “they were”.
<On further reading your other post I got this answer, but then again the adverb "now" is in parallel with the adverbial clause>
b.) Its numbers are now five times greater than “what they were” when …
(I gather this is the less preferred option from your posts but the correct answer in Q1.)
4) I understood from your post on lab rat post that from the meaning perspective what implies “the things that”. I am unable to find a situation in which the use of “What” would be correct except the above case in which it’s the less preferred choice. Could you please help with another eg. Would this work "The population of Japan doubled what it was in 2000"

This looks like a whole ton of overthinking to me, and an attempt to turn comparisons into iron-clad grammar rules. Unfortunately, that’s not really how the GMAT works. There’s only one real “rule” for comparisons on the GMAT: you need to choose the answer choice that most clearly and logically expresses the comparison.

Could a substantive clause be compared with a regular noun? Honestly, I’ve never had much reason to think about substantive clauses. I guess it wouldn’t be WRONG, exactly, to compare “numbers” to “what they were in the past”, or to say “the population of Japan doubled what it was in 2000.”

But why would we want to use those messy phrases when there are better alternatives? “The numbers were twice as great…” or “the population of Japan has doubled since 2000.” Much better, right? Even if the previous versions aren’t specifically violating any grammar rule.

It's not exactly the same issue, but you might benefit from reading this post or this post or this post about ellipsis, since those posts emphasize the fact that comparisons are about logic and clarity -- not mechanical rules. For a broader discussion of comparisons, you could suffer through this video and its sequel.

I hope this helps a bit!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Jul 2013
Posts: 7
GMAT 1: 620 Q46 V29
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 May 2019, 18:37
Located in the vast Atlantic Ocean, about seven miles off the coast of Venezuela, is a small but fertile island that had retained from the period of its first discovery the name of Trinidad, and though picturesque, has rarely been visited by Europeans until the sixteenth century.
A: is a small but fertile island that had retained from the period of its first discovery the name of Trinidad, and though picturesque, has rarely been

B: was the small but fertile island of Trinidad, which retained its name from the period
when it had first been discovered, and though picturesque, it had rarely been
C: Trinidad is a small but fertile island that retains its name from the period of its first
discovery, and though picturesque, has rarely been
D: is a small but fertile island, which has retained from the period of its first discovery
the name of Trinidad and, though picturesque, had rarely been
E:
the small but fertile island of Trinidad, retaining its name from the period of its first discovery, though picturesque, rarely

I chose option C as the modifier at the starting of the sentence actually modifies Trinidad. Please explain why its option D.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Mar 2019
Posts: 23
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Technology
Schools: Tuck '21, Duke Fuqua
GMAT 1: 680 Q45 V38
GPA: 3.5
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Reviews Badge
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 May 2019, 20:05
Hi GMAT Ninja,

I am a U.S. resident and have always had a knack for grammar. I scored a V38 on the GMAT a few days ago and usually score a bit higher (V40-41) on practice tests. This is all just using my ear for verbal. Can I get away with this and score V42-V43? SC is where I get the majority of my questions wrong. Anything specific I should learn in terms of technical SC techniques that are particularly helpful?

Best,
Michael
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2019, 06:46
1
spkumar wrote:
Located in the vast Atlantic Ocean, about seven miles off the coast of Venezuela, is a small but fertile island that had retained from the period of its first discovery the name of Trinidad, and though picturesque, has rarely been visited by Europeans until the sixteenth century.
A: is a small but fertile island that had retained from the period of its first discovery the name of Trinidad, and though picturesque, has rarely been

B: was the small but fertile island of Trinidad, which retained its name from the period
when it had first been discovered, and though picturesque, it had rarely been
C: Trinidad is a small but fertile island that retains its name from the period of its first
discovery, and though picturesque, has rarely been
D: is a small but fertile island, which has retained from the period of its first discovery
the name of Trinidad and, though picturesque, had rarely been
E:
the small but fertile island of Trinidad, retaining its name from the period of its first discovery, though picturesque, rarely

I chose option C as the modifier at the starting of the sentence actually modifies Trinidad. Please explain why its option D.

spkumar, do you know the source of that question? It doesn't look like an official question to me, and only appears in some locked threads on the GMAT Club website. Unless somebody can prove that it's an official one, it's not worth even a moment of your precious study time. Stick with the official stuff for verbal. :)
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2557
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2019, 07:04
delmoneyy wrote:
Hi GMAT Ninja,

I am a U.S. resident and have always had a knack for grammar. I scored a V38 on the GMAT a few days ago and usually score a bit higher (V40-41) on practice tests. This is all just using my ear for verbal. Can I get away with this and score V42-V43? SC is where I get the majority of my questions wrong. Anything specific I should learn in terms of technical SC techniques that are particularly helpful?

Best,
Michael

Thank you for writing in, Michael!

Have you already purchased an enhanced score report? If not, I would grab one ASAP. It's possible that SC isn't the problem, and your approach is working just fine -- which would mean that you need to sink your energy into RC and CR instead. Or the ESR might tell us that you're not doing so great on SC, and that your ear isn't really your friend on SC after all.

So go get some data, and go from there?

I hope this helps a bit!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Mar 2019
Posts: 23
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, Technology
Schools: Tuck '21, Duke Fuqua
GMAT 1: 680 Q45 V38
GPA: 3.5
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Reviews Badge
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 May 2019, 10:28
Hi GMAT NINJA,

Can you clarify when to use that vs. when to use which?

Best,
Michael
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Apr 2019
Posts: 17
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 May 2019, 06:14
Hi
If you could help me with this-
(U)The compounds identified by MBR are often of lower quality than those identified by(U) MR.

Correction according to kaplan key-
MBR often identifies compounds that are of lower quality than those identified by MR.

how is it the original sentence wrong?
It says that it is not parallel.
I thought that "those" is parallel with compounds and "MR" with "MBR".

Posted from my mobile device
GMAT Club Bot
Re: GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar   [#permalink] 22 May 2019, 06:14

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7    Next  [ 129 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

GMAT Ninja SC Expert - Ask Me Anything about GMAT SC and Grammar

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne