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In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian

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The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 684
Page:

In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians; only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

(A) only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but
(B) they were brilliant, G. H. Hardy alone recognized, but
(C) these theorems were brilliant, but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized;
(D) but, only one G. H. Hardy, recognizing their brilliance,
(E) only one G. H. Hardy recognized, but these theorems were brilliant
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 19:43
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'They' in B is ambiguous
'but only one' in C refers to theorems instead of mathematicians
D is also out because of but and recognizing
E is also
Hence A should be the correct answer


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New post 29 May 2017, 20:09
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A should be the answer.

In B 'they' is ambiguous

In C due to the wrong structure, the interpretation becomes open ended

In D, the structure is incorrect (but, one GH Hardy) and continuous tense is used which doesn't align with the rest of the sentence

E is structurally wrong in terms just as in D, also the cause and effect structure of the sentence is wrong...

A is the best option

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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 20:50
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hazelnut wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 684
Page:

In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians; only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

(A) only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but
(B) they were brilliant, G. H. Hardy alone recognized, but
(C) these theorems were brilliant, but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized;
(D) but, only one G. H. Hardy, recognizing their brilliance,
(E) only one G. H. Hardy recognized, but these theorems were brilliant


(A) Correctonly one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but
only one is correctly modifying G.H Hardy. What are recognized is correctly expressed
(B) Incorrect they were brilliant, G. H. Hardy alone recognized, but
'They' is ambigious G.H hardy recognized what?
(C) Incorrect these theorems were brilliant, but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized;
G.H Hardy recognized what? only one not correctly modifying G.H Hardy.
(D) Incorrect but, only one G. H. Hardy, recognizing their brilliance,
No verb for the subjec G.H Hardy
(E) Incorrect only one G. H. Hardy recognized, but these theorems were brilliant
G.H Hardy himself was recognized?
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In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2017, 17:12
Hi GMATNinja GMATNinjaTwo
in option C. Is below version correct:
In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan
mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians; these theorems were brilliant,
but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized
them ;
thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was
eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

Can you please elaborate on contrast suggested in OA?

WR,
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Last edited by adkikani on 25 Aug 2017, 22:41, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2017, 21:48
I cannot understand the importance of BUT in the first option. Can anyone explain ?

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New post 29 Jun 2017, 22:25
C is also wrong because if we read the sentence without the modifier, it seems as a run on sentence.

Though I do not understand the placement of BUT in option A.

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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2017, 06:21
Shouldn't the option A has AND instead of BUT? I dont see a contrast here.
It simply says that hardy recognized the brilliant work, and because of hardy's recognition Ramanujan became the fellow at royal society. NO?

Because of this BUT in option A, i eliminated A and marked C. And in my opinion C did some justice to the answer( except for this "only one, G. H. Hardy recognized" passive construction). Please help me out in eliminating C..

Without the outside knowledge ( of how many theorems did hardy recognized) i can say that the main sentence has 3 section-

-----In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians;

-----these theorems were brilliant, but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized; ( Correctly uses demonstrative pronoun, removes the ambiguity of they ( as in option B)- And if we FLIP! the sentence properly- THESE THEOREMS WERE BRILLIANT, BUT G.H.HARDY RECOGNIZED ONLY ONE;

-----thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

Is it only because of passive?? As I am trying to convince myself that option C is wrong I found WERE in C (because these theorems ARE still brilliant). IS IT THE REASON??

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In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2017, 04:20
Hi! "only one, G. H. Hardy recognized" is not passive voice.

The intent is to depict that despite the fact that Ramanujan sent his theorems to three mathematicians, only one of these mathematicians recognized their brilliance.

However (this is where the contrast comes in), just one recognition was sufficient, since this recognition was sufficient for Ramanujan to be elected to the Royal Society of London.
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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians; only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

(A) only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but
(B) they were brilliant, G. H. Hardy alone recognized, but
(C) these theorems were brilliant, but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized;
--> G. H. Hardy recognized WHAT???
(D) but, only one G. H. Hardy, recognizing their brilliance,
--> awkward.
(E) only one G. H. Hardy recognized, but these theorems were brilliant
--> G. H. Hardy recognized WHAT???
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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2017, 23:34
could not understand how to approach this question and how to eliminate.In option A how " but" can be connected with the rest of the sentence- if it is a independent clause where is the subject

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sidagar wrote:
could not understand how to approach this question and how to eliminate.In option A how " but" can be connected with the rest of the sentence- if it is a independent clause where is the subject


The subject of the clause after "but" is "Ramanujan" and the verb of this clause is "was" (the second clause is "Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London").

The phrase "thanks to Hardy's recognition" is a adverbial modifier referring to the clause "Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London" (precisely the verb "was").

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New post 19 Jul 2017, 23:40
that was a great explanation.Would be helpful if you can help us more on adverbial modifiers with examples.How they are placed etc?

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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2017, 01:42
hazelnut wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 684
Page:

In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians; only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

(A) only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but
(B) they were brilliant, G. H. Hardy alone recognized, but
(C) these theorems were brilliant, but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized;
(D) but, only one G. H. Hardy, recognizing their brilliance,
(E) only one G. H. Hardy recognized, but these theorems were brilliant


C - OUT. Just the ; in the end is enough to reject the option, as the sentence within is not an independent clause.
D - Recognising whose brilliance ? The theorem's or the three different british mathematicians. OUT
E - Hard recognised what? OUT.
B - 'they' can refer to theorems, and three different british mathematicians. Ambiguous. OUT.
A - Correct Answer.
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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians; only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

One has to get the full import of this tricky topic while solving.

There are three independent clauses involved in this list.

1) Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians.
2) only one, (among the three, namely) G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems;
3) but, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

It must be noted that the last of the three items has to be duly separated by a comma and fanboys 'but'.

(A) only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but ----- the correct choice

(B) they were brilliant, G. H. Hardy alone recognized, but --- The flipped version of this is -- G. H. Hardy alone recognized they were brilliant, but --- However, The problem is that 'they' can ambiguously mean either the mathematicians or the theorems.


(C) these theorems were brilliant, but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized; -- Yet again the flipped clause is ---- but only one, G. H. Hardy recognized these theorems were brilliant; ---Note that the fanboys ' but' is missing.

(D) but, only one G. H. Hardy, recognizing their brilliance, --
1. may wrongly imply that there were several Hardys, but only one among them recognized---
2. The middle arm is no clause and thus breaks the list parallelism.
3. The 'but' should actually appear before the last item, but is missing.

(E) only one G. H. Hardy recognized, but these theorems were brilliant --
1. same problem as in E.
2.implies that the theorems were brilliant thanks to Hardy's recognition.

A, on the contrary, keeps parallelism and meaning intact and logical.
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In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2017, 00:38
In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan mailed 120 of his theorems to three different British mathematicians; only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but thanks to Hardy's recognition, Ramanujan was eventually elected to the Royal Society of London.

(A) only one, G. H. Hardy, recognized the brilliance of these theorems, but

why BUT is here. X recognized the brilliance of these theorems BUT thanks to X, Y was elected.
It doesn't seems correct.

sayantanc2k: pl have a look

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In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2017, 22:10
GMATNinja, Can you please describe the importance of "but" in the original answer choice?
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New post 29 Oct 2017, 08:54
Only 'but' stopped me to chose answer 'A'. Can anyone explain me role 'but' in that answer?

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Re: In 1913, the largely self-taught Indian   [#permalink] 29 Oct 2017, 08:54
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