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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ

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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

(A) People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.

(B) Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.

(C) Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.

(D) Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.

(E) Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.

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Originally posted by vscid on 11 Mar 2010, 19:04.
Last edited by hazelnut on 21 Oct 2017, 04:24, edited 2 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: CR Revision: In the 18th and 19th centuries it was believed in many  [#permalink]

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souvik101990 wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them. Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.

B. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.

C. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.

D. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.

E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


Premises:

- Much of the waterfront was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce.
- Today, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front

Conclusion:
To make a large profit, buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Much of the waterfront was developed as industry/commerce area. Today, residential properties along the beach are seen as prestigious. We don't know how many such current residential properties there are and how far they are from industry/commerce area. They could be very few and away from industry, we don't know.

We are concluding that to make a large profit, buy "urban" waterfront lots and make residential buildings. The "urban" waterfront would be industry/commerce area. We don't know whether people would be willing to pay large sums for residential places in these districts.
Hence (B) supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties.

D. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
Developers would be getting tax incentives to rehabilitate waterfront areas. So their cost might be lower than the cost of setting up residential properties inland. But to make profits, they will still need people to buy these properties. If people don't buy, whatever the cost may be, they may not be able to even recover that.

(B) is certainly better than (D).
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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2017, 04:17
vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

(A) People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.

(B) Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.

(C) Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.

(D) Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.

(E) Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


Correct Answers in Must Be True Questions Reviewed

Let us take a moment to review two types of answers that will always be correct in a Must Be True question.

1. Paraphrased Answers

Paraphrased Answers are answers that restate a portion of the stimulus in different terms. Because the language is not exactly the same as in the stimulus, Paraphrased Answers can be easy to miss.

Paraphrased Answers are designed to test your ability to discern the author’s exact meaning. Sometimes the answer can appear to be almost too obvious since it is drawn directly from the stimulus.

2. Answers that are the sum of two or more stimulus statements (Combination Answers)

Any answer choice that would result from combining two or more statements in the stimulus will be correct.

Should you encounter either of the above as answer choices in a Must Be True question, go ahead and select the answer with confidence.


OFFICIAL EXPLANATION


The conclusion is that a developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them. The basis for that claim is that people pay large sums for beach front homes. We are asked to strengthen this argument.

(A) This choice states that people have more buying power today than in previous centuries. This does not strengthen the claim that a developer will make money on urban waterfront properties.

(B) CORRECT. This choice states that homeowners will be willing to spend large sums of money on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts. Since we know from the argument that urban waterfronts have traditionally been industrial, this fact strengthens the claim that a developer can make a profit on urban waterfront properties.

(C) This choice states that many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase. This does not suggest, however, that a developer will be able to sell them after he or she builds on them.

(D) This choice states that many coastal cities are giving tax breaks to developers who rehabilitate the waterfront. But this does not suggest that anyone will buy the developed properties.

(E) This choice states that properties in the interior of cities are more expensive than those on the waterfront. Although waterfront properties are therefore cheaper to acquire, this does not necessarily mean that a developer can make a profit after buying such properties.
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2010, 19:52
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vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries. - more money, relatively speaking, not discussed in the stimulus.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts. - goes hand-in-hand with the statement - "waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front."
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase. - we don't know about this, we only know that it is industrial and commercial space.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives. - tax incentives are not discussed, careful not to assume.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront. - weakens actually, if interior spaces are more expensive, real estate developers won't be looking at waterfront properties.

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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2010, 07:09
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my pick is (B)

In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

a)People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
>>> This does not effect property developers profit

b)Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
>>> Since homeowners are willing to spend large sums on residential properties in industrial district, it is likely that developers will make profits by making buildings on those properties because as per the premise waterfront properties were taken by industry and commerce

c)Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
>>> This does not effect property developers profit

d)Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
>>> Tax incentives are no where mentioned in premise

e)Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
>>> out of scope
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2013, 23:02
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vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


KEY is: the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce ==> New residential buildings should be built on the waterfront that used to be industry and commerce districts.

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
Wrong. Out of scope.

2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
Correct. A developer can make profit ONLY IF customers are willing to pay for properties used to be industrial or commercial districts. If Customers are not willing to pay, a developer's plan will fail.

3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
Wrong. Shell game. What if there are many available lots but nobody wants to buy?

4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
Wrong. Out of scope.

5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.
Wrong. Out of scope

Hope it helps.
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

Conc.: To make large profits, a developer should buy WF (earlier for industrial and commerce use) and erect RB on them.
Few assumptions can be:
1. If no such WFs are available for purchase or
2. WFs are available but no purchaser or
3. Purchaser/developer is available but no buyer of build residential properties or
4. Buyers are available but they are not willing to buy RB on earlier used-to-be-industrial/commercial places.


A] People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries - OFS
B] Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts - Correct. Buyers are available and they are willing to spend on erstwhile ind./comm. properties
C] Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase - Go with one of assumptions but Option B is more strong as what if lots are available for purchase but no buyer is available ? Hence wrong.
D] Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives - Question talks about profits. What if developer erect property because of great tax-incentive but could not find any buyer for this property ? He will suffer losses.
E] Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront - OFS


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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2015, 12:51
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vscid wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
5]Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


I've encountered this questions in the second MGMAT CAT. The correct answer here is just restating the portion stated in the question stem (see the hghlited part above)
As many say here that the Info from (D) is not earlier stated in the text and thus (D) is incorrect - I don't agree here, it's a strengthen question, so you can not discard an answer choice because of the new information, actually by this type of questions you have almost always new information that supports the conlusion somehow. It's NOT an Assumption question or "Must be True" Question, in which you can not use new information, which has not be already stated earlier in the text. I don't think that this question resembles the intended logic (real GMAT).
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Re: CR Revision: In the 18th and 19th centuries it was believed in many  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2016, 03:46
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souvik101990 wrote:
In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal American cities that the waterfront was an undesirable location for residential buildings. As a result, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce. Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front. A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them. Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.

B. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.

C. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.

D. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.

E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront.


hi,
the para can be rephrased as-
earlier waterfront areas were not thought of as residential areas and thus only industrial and commercial ventures stareted here. However now things have changed and people are willing to pick up houses here.
conclusion property dealers, wanting to make profits, should create houses and earn profit..
Requirement most strongly supports the claim ..

lets see the choices:-

A. People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.
this does not tell us "why in particular waterfront areas should be preferred

B. Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.
the catch here is traditionally industrial or commercial districts.. these is what waterfront areas fit into...CORRECT

C. Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase.
It doe snot talk of "PROFIT"

D. Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
tax incentives alone cannot transform into large profits

E. Properties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront
we are not comparing anything..

ans B
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Re: CR Revision: In the 18th and 19th centuries it was believed in many  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2016, 10:01
chetan2u

I am torn between B & D. Isn't B just a restatement of the premise that we already have the buyer who are ready to pay larger sum. But D gives us the another component of the profit.
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Re: CR Revision: In the 18th and 19th centuries it was believed in many  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2016, 03:49
divyaverma wrote:
chetan2u

I am torn between B & D. Isn't B just a restatement of the premise that we already have the buyer who are ready to pay larger sum. But D gives us the another component of the profit.



Hi diya,

The problem with D is that it talks of MANY and not ALL...
Also tax incentives may not result in huge profit being talked of.
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Re: In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was believed in many coastal Americ  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2017, 10:59
Premise 1: 18th and 19th century, much of the waterfront in these cities was never developed aesthetically and instead was left to industry and commerce.

Premise 2: Today, however, waterfront properties are generally seen as prestigious, as evidenced by the large sums paid for homes along the beach front.

Conclusion: A developer who wishes to make a large profit would be wise to buy urban waterfront lots and erect residential buildings on them.

Question Type: Strengthen

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the claim made about urban waterfront properties?

1]People today have more money, relatively speaking, to spend on real estate than they did in previous centuries.

Okay so they do have the money to spend on real estates but why would they spend on waterfront properties? why wouldn't they pay for central districts/downtowns? Can't assume more money to spend = spending on waterfront properties

2]Homeowners will be willing to spend large sums on residential properties in traditionally industrial or commercial districts.----
This strengthens the conclusion!

3]Many urban waterfront lots are available for purchase -- available? great but why should one buy them? doesn't strengthen.

4]Many coastal American cities are encouraging developers to rehabilitate the waterfront through tax incentives.
[i]So they erect the water front properties but that doesn't meant that people would buy them[i]

5]Proper ties in interior residential districts in coastal American cities are significantly more expensive than those along the waterfront -- so they are cheaper than interior residential districts. but what if suburbs are cheaper?
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Re: CR Revision: In the 18th and 19th centuries it was believed in many  [#permalink]

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