GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 23 Oct 2018, 14:28

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Director
Director
User avatar
B
Status: I don't stop when I'm Tired,I stop when I'm done
Joined: 11 May 2014
Posts: 542
Location: Bangladesh
Concentration: Finance, Leadership
GPA: 2.81
WE: Business Development (Real Estate)
Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jun 2017, 15:08
12
1
1
Top Contributor
65
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

56% (00:38) correct 44% (00:44) wrong based on 2406 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.


(A) a similar period

(B) a similar period’s

(C) in a similar period

(D) that in a similar period

(E) that of a similar period


The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Sentence Correction
Question No.: 784


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 237: Sentence Correction


Subscribe to GMAT Question of the Day: E-mail | RSS
For All QOTD Questions Click Here


https://www.economist.com/node/11294258/print?story_id=11294258

Pick almost any American newspaper company and you can tell a similar story. The ABC reported that for the 530 biggest dailies, average circulation in the past six months was 3.6% lower than in the same period a year earlier; for Sunday papers, it was 4.6% lower. Ad revenues are plunging across the board: by 22.3% at Media General, for example. In 2007 total newspaper revenues fell to $42.2 billion, not to be sniffed at, certainly, but a lot less than the peak of $48.7 billion in 2000.

Newspaper Circulation

(A) Comparison (X lower than Y)

(B) Comparison (X lower than Y)

(C) CORRECT

(D) Comparison (X lower than Y)

(E) Comparison (X lower than Y)


First glance

The answer choices are very short, so go ahead and read them (in their entirety) now. You will either know the issue or you won’t—so don’t spend a ton of time on this problem. The word just before the underline is than and the beginning of each answer splits between a noun and inserting in or that (in / of) before the noun. The problem is testing Comparisons.

Issues

(1) Comparison: X lower than Y

In a comparison, the X and Y elements must be parallel. The X element and the comparison marker itself are not underlined:

Most newspapers had lower circulation in the six months … than ______ period earlier

The comparison marker is had lower circulation … than. The X element is in the six months (ie, in a certain six-month period). The Y element, therefore, should also be a prepositional phrase (and that requires starting the answer choice with a preposition). A different version of this sentence could have just nouns as the parallel elements: at most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers, [one time period] had lower circulation than [another time period]. However, the non-underlined sentence in this question places the X element amid parts of the parallel marker; in is thus unavoidably part of the X element, requiring in to be part of the Y element.

Eliminate choices (A) and (B) because they are straight nouns, not prepositional phrases.

Choices (D) and (E) are trickier. They both toss in the pronoun that. What noun does that refer to? Circulation fits logically. However, it’s redundant to repeat the word circulation, as it is already placed within the comparison marker: newspapers had lower circulation (in one time period) … than circulation (in another time period). Eliminate choices (D) and (E) for redundancy.

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (C) properly compares a prepositional phrase (in the six months …) with another prepositional phrase (in a similar period).

_________________

Md. Abdur Rakib

Please Press +1 Kudos,If it helps
Sentence Correction-Collection of Ron Purewal's "elliptical construction/analogies" for SC Challenges

Economist GMAT Tutor Discount CodesOptimus Prep Discount CodesManhattan GMAT Discount Codes
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 6983
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jun 2017, 20:24
21
13
AbdurRakib wrote:
Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.
A. a similar period
B. a similar period’s
C. in a similar period
D. that in a similar period
E. that of a similar period


The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Sentence Correction
Question No.: 784



Hi

What are we comparing ...
Positioning of circulation as part of 'lower circulation' should get you close to the answer..

So we are comparing circulation in TWO periods..

1) A and B wrongly compare a period directly to the circulation...
2) C and D get the preposition in to make a prepositional phrase..

Now in D what does THAT stand for- lower circulation. Substitute for THAT and see if the sentence makes sense.

Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than lower circulation in a similar period a year earlier.

So what we do is - compare two periods as part of prepositional phrase...
" in the six months....." Is parallel to " in similar period ...."

Ans C
_________________

1) Absolute modulus : http://gmatclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-210849.html#p1622372
2)Combination of similar and dissimilar things : http://gmatclub.com/forum/topic215915.html
3) effects of arithmetic operations : https://gmatclub.com/forum/effects-of-arithmetic-operations-on-fractions-269413.html


GMAT online Tutor

GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2039
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: QOTD: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2018, 09:37
3
5
The heart of this question is that we’re trying to compare the fact that the newspapers had a lower circulation “in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996” than… well, we’re trying to compare the circulation in one period to the circulation “in a similar period”, so that should lead us to the right answer pretty quickly.

Quote:
(A) a similar period

The comparison isn’t quite right here. The newspapers “had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.” Nope, we would need to say that the circulation was lower in a similar period for this to make sense.

(A) is out.

Quote:
(B) a similar period’s

(B) basically gives us the same mistake as (A), except that now “period’s” is possessive. I guess it’s trying to possess “circulation”? Can a “period” possess “circulation”? Seems wacky to me.

Even if we give it the benefit of the doubt, that leaves us with “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period’s circulation a year earlier.” That’s not completely illogical, I guess, but it doesn’t cut to the heart of the comparison – we’re trying to emphasize the difference in circulation in the two periods. And that possessive thing still strikes me as weird.

If you really wanted to be conservative, you could keep (B), but we’ll have a better option in a moment.

Quote:
(C) in a similar period

This is about as clear as it can get: “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than in a similar period a year earlier.” That cleanly compares the circulation in one period with circulation in another.

So let’s keep (C).

Quote:
(D) that in a similar period

In this context, “that” is trying to act as a singular pronoun. (More on the GMAT’s many uses of “that” in this article.) I guess “that” refers back to circulation, so that gives us: “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than the circulation in a similar period a year earlier.”

That’s not necessarily illogical, but it’s a waste of words. (C) is more succinct, and I can’t figure out why we would need to repeat the word “circulation” – or a pronoun that refers back to the word “circulation” – in this sentence.

So (C) is still better than (D).

Quote:
(E) that of a similar period

And (E) is just a crappier version of (D). There’s no need to include the word “that” here, but it also doesn’t make sense to talk about “the circulation of a similar period.” We could talk about “the circulation of a newspaper”, because the newspaper itself “circulates” (i.e., the newspaper is distributed among the population), but we wouldn’t circulate “a period.”

So (E) is out, and we’re left with (C).
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Most Helpful Community Reply
Intern
Intern
avatar
S
Joined: 28 Jan 2017
Posts: 37
Location: India
GMAT 1: 750 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.29
Reviews Badge
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Jul 2017, 11:33
16
13
D- Is wrong because when comparison term - "circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996" comes after comparison verb - "had" then noun copies - that/those are not required.

Similar example:
- Wild animals have less total fat than livestock animals. "total fat" comes after "have"
- According to X, more babies were born to women over 30 years of age than under 30 years of age. "women over 30 years of age" comes after "were"
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3620
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 02:05
5
1
1
bpiyush wrote:
Experts please help me with this. Why option D is wrong and C correct? Does that not refer to lower circulation?


Hi bpiyush ,

Try to replace 'that' with lower circulation and read the sentence again.

It will be like :

Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than lower circulation in a similar period a year earlier.

Are you comparing two lower circulations?? Or are you saying circulation in one period was lower than in another period?

Try to read the sentence I have written slowly, you will be able to see what I am trying to convey.

Does that make sense?
_________________

My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog

GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.

New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!



Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free

Check our new About Us Page here.

General Discussion
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Status: MBA Candidate Class of 2020
Joined: 10 Jan 2016
Posts: 113
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GMAT 1: 620 Q47 V29
GMAT 2: 670 Q50 V31
GPA: 4
WE: Business Development (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jun 2017, 09:03
9
The structure looks like

Had lower circulation in X than in Y.

Kudos if you like it.

Posted from my mobile device
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 282
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 730 Q51 V36
GPA: 3.56
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2017, 07:20
3
1
Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.
A. a similar period
B. a similar period’s
C. in a similar period
D. that in a similar period
E. that of a similar period
_________________

Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one - Bruce Lee

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Jul 2016
Posts: 14
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 01:56
Experts please help me with this. Why option D is wrong and C correct? Does that not refer to lower circulation?
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 15 Dec 2015
Posts: 116
GMAT 1: 660 Q46 V35
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2017, 23:12
@Experts, Please help with this: Why option D is wrong and C correct?
Retired Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 3018
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2017, 05:15
20
8
DH99 wrote:
@Experts, Please help with this: Why option D is wrong and C correct?


The correct comparisons are as follows:

Structure 1:
Comparing "circulation" with "circulation" - The circulation in period X is more than the circulation in period Y. OR The circulation in period X is more than that in period Y.

Structure 2:
Comparing 2 periods - The circulation is more in period X than in period Y. In this case the use of "that" to replace "circulation" would be incorrect.

The subject sentence has the structure 2.
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 27 Jan 2016
Posts: 142
Schools: ISB '18
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Oct 2017, 09:01
3
Option D would be correct if the sentence construction was - “The circulation of country’s biggest daily newspapers in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 was lower than that in a similar period a year earlier.

Here the subject of the clause is "Circulation", So the pronoun that replaces the subject "circulation" and the comparision seems to be logical as the entities being compared are the circulations in two different periods.

However the sentence structure in the question under discussion is different.

Newspapers had lower circulation in the period X than (they had) in period Y.

Here is a similar question and option C is the right answer.

In no other historical sighting did Halley's Comet
cause such a worldwide sensation as did its return in
1910-1911.
(A) did its return in 1910-1911
(B) had its 1910-1911 return
(C) in its return of 1910-1911
(D) its return of 1910-1911 did
(E) its return in 1910-1911
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Greatness begins beyond your comfort zone
Joined: 08 Dec 2013
Posts: 2088
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
Schools: Kelley '20, ISB '19
GPA: 3.2
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Nov 2017, 06:58
1
AbdurRakib wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Sentence Correction
Question No.: 784

Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.

(A) a similar period
(B) a similar period’s
(C) in a similar period
(D) that in a similar period
(E) that of a similar period


In D, that seems to stand in for the circulation, as follows:
D: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than the circulation in a similar period a year earlier.
Here, the phrase in blue refers to the sales figures for each newspaper:
Newspaper A = 1,000,000 copies.
Newspaper B = 900,000 copies.
Newspaper C = 875,000 copies.
But the phrase in red -- THE circulation -- implies that a year earlier ONE SPECIFIC CIRCULATION was shared by all of the newspapers.
It is illogical to compare the different sales figures for each newspaper to one specific circulation.
Eliminate D.

The OA implies the following:
Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than [they had circulation] in a similar period a year earlier.
Here, the words in brackets are omitted but implied.
The result is a logical comparison: the sales figures for each newspaper from October 1995 through March 1996 are compared to the sales figures for each newspaper in a similar period a year earlier.
_________________

When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. - Henry Ford
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long
+1 Kudos if you find this post helpful

BSchool Forum Moderator
User avatar
D
Joined: 28 Mar 2017
Posts: 1172
Location: India
GMAT 1: 730 Q49 V41
GPA: 4
Re: QOTD: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2018, 09:45
1
Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.

(A) a similar period --Ambiguous comparison

(B) a similar period’s --We are comparing time

(C) in a similar period --Correct

(D) that in a similar period --We need to compare time not circulation

(E) that of a similar period --Wrong
_________________

Kudos if my post helps!

Long And A Fruitful Journey - V21 to V41; If I can, So Can You!!


Preparing for RC my way


My study resources:
1. Useful Formulae, Concepts and Tricks-Quant
2. e-GMAT's ALL SC Compilation
3. LSAT RC compilation
4. Actual LSAT CR collection by Broal
5. QOTD RC (Carcass)
6. Challange OG RC
7. GMAT Prep Challenge RC

Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 15 Jan 2014
Posts: 22
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Oct 2018, 11:17
GMATNinja wrote:
The heart of this question is that we’re trying to compare the fact that the newspapers had a lower circulation “in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996” than… well, we’re trying to compare the circulation in one period to the circulation “in a similar period”, so that should lead us to the right answer pretty quickly.

Quote:
(A) a similar period

The comparison isn’t quite right here. The newspapers “had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.” Nope, we would need to say that the circulation was lower in a similar period for this to make sense.

(A) is out.

Quote:
(B) a similar period’s

(B) basically gives us the same mistake as (A), except that now “period’s” is possessive. I guess it’s trying to possess “circulation”? Can a “period” possess “circulation”? Seems wacky to me.

Even if we give it the benefit of the doubt, that leaves us with “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period’s circulation a year earlier.” That’s not completely illogical, I guess, but it doesn’t cut to the heart of the comparison – we’re trying to emphasize the difference in circulation in the two periods. And that possessive thing still strikes me as weird.

If you really wanted to be conservative, you could keep (B), but we’ll have a better option in a moment.

Quote:
(C) in a similar period

This is about as clear as it can get: “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than in a similar period a year earlier.” That cleanly compares the circulation in one period with circulation in another.

So let’s keep (C).

Quote:
(D) that in a similar period

In this context, “that” is trying to act as a singular pronoun. (More on the GMAT’s many uses of “that” in this article.) I guess “that” refers back to circulation, so that gives us: “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than the circulation in a similar period a year earlier.”

That’s not necessarily illogical, but it’s a waste of words. (C) is more succinct, and I can’t figure out why we would need to repeat the word “circulation” – or a pronoun that refers back to the word “circulation” – in this sentence.

So (C) is still better than (D).

Quote:
(E) that of a similar period

And (E) is just a crappier version of (D). There’s no need to include the word “that” here, but it also doesn’t make sense to talk about “the circulation of a similar period.” We could talk about “the circulation of a newspaper”, because the newspaper itself “circulates” (i.e., the newspaper is distributed among the population), but we wouldn’t circulate “a period.”

So (E) is out, and we’re left with (C).


hi,

I have a confusion here. In most of the case we don't repeat the prepositions such as ,

He wanted to sing and dance. ( Here we don't repeat "to" ) and I have seen similar instances for by ( I guess its known as elliptical ?) . So why are we repeating "in" here ? That is the main reaosn i chose option "that un a similar period"
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 20 Sep 2016
Posts: 320
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Oct 2018, 20:11
sanathadiga wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
The heart of this question is that we’re trying to compare the fact that the newspapers had a lower circulation “in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996” than… well, we’re trying to compare the circulation in one period to the circulation “in a similar period”, so that should lead us to the right answer pretty quickly.

Quote:
(A) a similar period

The comparison isn’t quite right here. The newspapers “had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.” Nope, we would need to say that the circulation was lower in a similar period for this to make sense.

(A) is out.

Quote:
(B) a similar period’s

(B) basically gives us the same mistake as (A), except that now “period’s” is possessive. I guess it’s trying to possess “circulation”? Can a “period” possess “circulation”? Seems wacky to me.

Even if we give it the benefit of the doubt, that leaves us with “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period’s circulation a year earlier.” That’s not completely illogical, I guess, but it doesn’t cut to the heart of the comparison – we’re trying to emphasize the difference in circulation in the two periods. And that possessive thing still strikes me as weird.

If you really wanted to be conservative, you could keep (B), but we’ll have a better option in a moment.

Quote:
(C) in a similar period

This is about as clear as it can get: “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than in a similar period a year earlier.” That cleanly compares the circulation in one period with circulation in another.

So let’s keep (C).

Quote:
(D) that in a similar period

In this context, “that” is trying to act as a singular pronoun. (More on the GMAT’s many uses of “that” in this article.) I guess “that” refers back to circulation, so that gives us: “… newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than the circulation in a similar period a year earlier.”

That’s not necessarily illogical, but it’s a waste of words. (C) is more succinct, and I can’t figure out why we would need to repeat the word “circulation” – or a pronoun that refers back to the word “circulation” – in this sentence.

So (C) is still better than (D).

Quote:
(E) that of a similar period

And (E) is just a crappier version of (D). There’s no need to include the word “that” here, but it also doesn’t make sense to talk about “the circulation of a similar period.” We could talk about “the circulation of a newspaper”, because the newspaper itself “circulates” (i.e., the newspaper is distributed among the population), but we wouldn’t circulate “a period.”

So (E) is out, and we’re left with (C).


hi,

I have a confusion here. In most of the case we don't repeat the prepositions such as ,

He wanted to sing and dance. ( Here we don't repeat "to" ) and I have seen similar instances for by ( I guess its known as elliptical ?) . So why are we repeating "in" here ? That is the main reaosn i chose option "that un a similar period"



Question-
Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation in the six months from October 1995 through March 1996 than a similar period a year earlier.

Meaning- most biggest newspapers had lower circulation in 1 period than in another period.

Errors- if we don't use "in"
We basically get two comparisons-
1) circulation was lower in one period than second period - here the circulation is being compared to "second period"
2) circulation was lower in one period than (in) second period
-here the comparison is between two time periods.

Eg: I like ice-cream more than Tina
Meanings- I like ice-cream more
Than I like Tina
- here the comparison is between ice-cream and Tina

Meaning- I like ice-cream more than Tina does(likes ice-cream)
Here comparison is between "I " and Tina.
So ambiguity is present.

You'll say that the comparison between circulation and period is illogical ..you're right..but on SC we want the LEAST AMBIGUOUS case. If there is a more accurate answer choice which is less AMBIGUOUS you choose that. If there isn't a more clear comparison A would have been the right answer.

Why not D? - the crux of the sentence conveys that we are comparing 2 periods and not circulations in two periods.
So B, D and E are gone.

Between A and C , C is clear and unambiguous ...so C

(A) a similar period
(B) a similar period’s
(C) in a similar period
(D) that in a similar period
(E) that of a similar period


Now you might say there are official questions where there is no clear prepositions added before the comparison ...true.
Take for eg: "fat in animal is less than"... I don't know the exact sentence...but you can search the quote..there you'll find that a clear comparison isn't present. But that choice is the least WORST in other choices...

We want the least worst....
Hope this helps

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Oct 2018
Posts: 4
Location: United States
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Finance
GPA: 3.97
CAT Tests
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Oct 2018, 00:24
Wow. excellent question. I really like the solution by gmatexam439. short & sweet.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation &nbs [#permalink] 20 Oct 2018, 00:24
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Most of the country’s biggest daily newspapers had lower circulation

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.