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Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a

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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2017, 09:27
I have in my notes that we don't have to use comma to connect two clauses when the subject is the same, although I did not write down the source. Someone should confirm this :)
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2017, 16:33
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The simple answer is that the GMAT is not consistent on this. Keep in mind that comma usage is generally not tested directly. The one absolute rule you *can* rely on is that you can't join two independent clauses with *only* a comma, as in "I like pie, it is tasty." You always need a conjunction or a semicolon.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2017, 10:04
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Shiv2016, I think part of the confusion is that there's a typo in the OP: there's no comma before the "and" in the OG version of this question. Here's the corrected version:

Quote:
Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising
(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising
(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise
(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising


So (B) is correct, and the comma is a non-issue. :)

Quote:
Also can this be a correct version of this sentence?

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago.


In real life, your sentence would be completely fine, in my opinion. But if we're being really strict and literal with this particular OG question, it's definitely not ideal: it sounds like we're comparing the prices themselves to last year, and that's not logical. More importantly, there's a better alternative available that makes the comparison much clearer: "Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than those of a year ago..." The correct version sharpens the comparison between old prices and new prices.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2018, 16:09
Arlene0504 wrote:
Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising
(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising
(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise
(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising

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daagh, @Experts,

What does "those of" stand in option B.

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising

If it were just "THOSE" i would have understood. But i am not able to understand how "those of" stands for "prices"
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 19:44
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ammuseeru wrote:
Arlene0504 wrote:
Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising
(C) than a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising
(D) as those of a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south hurt crops and therefore raise
(E) as they were a year ago and are going down, despite floods in the Midwest and drought in the south, and are hurting crops and therefore raising

OG2017 SC758


daagh, @Experts,

What does "those of" stand in option B.

Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised corn and soybean prices.

(A) than a year ago and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raised
(B) than those of a year ago, and are going down, even though floods in the Midwest and drought in the south are hurting crops and therefore raising

If it were just "THOSE" i would have understood. But i am not able to understand how "those of" stands for "prices"

"Those" is a plural pronoun, so it has to refer to a plural noun, right? Well, the only plural noun that comes before "those" is "prices," so there's nothing else it could possibly refer to! If you're unsure about the logic, simply replace "those" with "prices" and see if the sentence makes sense.

"Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than [prices] of a year ago..."

Sounds okay to me! So we've got confirmation that "those" does indeed refer to "prices."

(It seems as though you were thrown off by the presence of the preposition "of." All it's doing in the above sentence is modifying "prices." Which prices? The ones of a year ago. It plays the exact same role in the construction "those of a year ago.")

I hope that helps!
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2018, 00:59
DmitryFarber wrote:
zoezhuyan, I agree with my colleague Ron Purewal (cited above) that the comparisons in A and C aren't necessarily faulty. There are other reasons to eliminate those choices. However, I want to make a slight correction to your analysis above. Your use of "that of" or "those of" in parentheses makes it appear that the implied comparison is between two nouns. Actually, your choices should read ("they were") or ("it was"). The comparison is actually between two adverbial modifiers. Prices are different now than they were last year. This is important because I can't say something like this:

American crows are larger today than in ancient China.

If we filled in "those," this might make sense: "American crows are larger today than those (crows) in ancient China." However, the actual implied meaning here is a comparison between two modifiers: "today" and "in ancient China." "American crows are larger today than (they were) in ancient China." This would make it seem that American crows existed in ancient China!


thank you, it is great explanation
the takeaway is that "those" can or can not happen in the comparison.
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Re: Prices at the producer level are only 1.3 percent higher now than a &nbs [#permalink] 27 Sep 2018, 00:59

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