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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b

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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2015, 05:58
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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2015, 10:18
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A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand --- He didn’t claim proof for subjects
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference ---He didn’t claim proof for a card
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand -- He didn’t claim proof of subjects
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference --- When a claim is reported a relative clause using' that' is required correct choice
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand—unconcise--- capable to use is unidiomatic. Could identify is more forthwith
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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 07 May 2019, 12:28
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Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one problem at a time, to narrow it down to the correct answer quickly! First, let's take a quick look at the original question. We highlighted the major differences between each option in orange:

From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand

After a quick glance over each option, there are a couple issues we can focus on to rule out incorrect answers quickly:

1. How they begin: for subjects / for a card / of subjects / that subjects
2. Placement of the phrase "a card in the dealer's hand" (possibly an issue with active/passive voice?)


Let's start with #1 on our list because it will likely rule out 2-3 answers quickly. When we talk about a person claiming statistical proof, each of these phrases mean something slightly different:

claiming statistical proof for subjects = Joshep Rhine is gathering proof that he plans to give to the subjects that they will then own
claiming statistical proof of subjects = Joshep Rhine is gathering proof that he can find subjects who can do this particular task
claiming statistical proof that subjects = Joshep Rhine is gathering proof that his subjects can do a particular task

It makes the clearest sense to say that Rhine is collecting proof that his subjects can use thought transference. He's not later giving that proof to his subjects, and there is no question that he already has subjects that can do this task, so the other two don't really make sense for this purpose. Therefore, we can rule out options A & C because they don't convey the most accurate meaning.

Now that we're left with only 3 options, let's tackle #2 on the list: where to put the phrase "a card in the dealer's hand." Whenever we see a phrase placed in so many different places, we are likely dealing with an issue of clarity or passive/active voice. Let's take a look at each answer to determine which option conveys the correct meaning as clearly as possible:

B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference

This option is INCORRECT because it's written using passive voice. Instead of making the subjects the focus of the phrase, it makes the cards in the dealer's hand the focus. This isn't the clearest way to say this. Rhine isn't providing proof that the cards are doing anything - he's proving the subjects can do things.

D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference

This option is CORRECT! It is clear that the subject is the focus of the phrase, it uses active voice, and the rest of the phrase is also clear and concise.

E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand

This is INCORRECT because it uses confusing and overly worded construction to convey meaning. Instead of saying "are capable to use," this could simply say "can use" or "could use" to convey the same meaning more clearly. Also, the phrase "for identifying" isn't as clear as saying "to identify" in this case. It sounds a bit overdone and confusing to some readers.


There you go - option D is the correct choice! It conveys the correct meaning and uses concise and clear language to convey information to readers!


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Originally posted by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 06 Sep 2018, 11:18.
Last edited by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 07 May 2019, 12:28, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2015, 01:33
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Meaning:
1. From an experiment, Joshep Banks claimed proof.
2. Proof that “ Subject are able to identify cards”

With this meaning in View, lets do POE.

Split # 1 : “Poof that” Vs “Proof For”
As per intended meaning of this sentence, we need to say Rhine has found proof that not proof for someone.
Option A,B – Incorrect.


Lets do choice by choice POE for rest


C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
“Preposition of” is followed by an action here – should be followed by noun or noun phrase - Incorrect


D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
Correct – no error.


E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand
“Capable to” is not correct in this context, should be “capable of”
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2016, 10:47
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thanhmaitran wrote:
From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand



A. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof for subjects
B. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof for a card
C. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof of subjects
D. Joshep Banks Rhine did claim of the 'fact' that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference. Hence use of 'that' is correct.
E. Joshep Banks Rhine 'claimed - subjects 'are' - not parallel - inappropriate.
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2016, 06:19
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aveek86 wrote:
thanhmaitran wrote:
From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand



A. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof for subjects
B. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof for a card
C. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof of subjects
D. Joshep Banks Rhine did claim of the 'fact' that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference. Hence use of 'that' is correct.
E. Joshep Banks Rhine 'claimed - subjects 'are' - not parallel - inappropriate.


The reasoning mentioned above for striking out E is wrong. We need to see the only intended meaning.
For example - Rhine claimed that sun rises in the east. Here Claimed is past tense and rises is present tense. So in the above mentioned case, the proof submitted may be a universal truth, which we don't know. The reason for elimination of E should be the usage of wrong idiom "Capable to". [Capable of is the right idiom.]
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2016, 13:42
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sowragu wrote:
aveek86 wrote:
thanhmaitran wrote:
From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand



A. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof for subjects
B. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof for a card
C. Joshep Banks Rhine didn’t claim proof of subjects
D. Joshep Banks Rhine did claim of the 'fact' that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference. Hence use of 'that' is correct.
E. Joshep Banks Rhine 'claimed - subjects 'are' - not parallel - inappropriate.


The reasoning mentioned above for striking out E is wrong. We need to see the only intended meaning.
For example - Rhine claimed that sun rises in the east. Here Claimed is past tense and rises is present tense. So in the above mentioned case, the proof submitted may be a universal truth, which we don't know. The reason for elimination of E should be the usage of wrong idiom "Capable to". [Capable of is the right idiom.]


Yes, I agree with your point. For expressing universal truths (such as the example you mentioned: sun rises in the east), we always use simple present, even though the clause occurs within a statement in the past. 'subjects are....' is such a universal truth.
[recap: a universal truth... not an universal truth.. because the pronunciation begins with "yu"]
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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Sep 2018, 23:20
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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand


Why is B wrong? I dont quite understand the explanation ...

Thank you!

Originally posted by Wowgmat2016 on 30 May 2016, 20:19.
Last edited by Bunuel on 06 Sep 2018, 23:20, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: OG16 Qn7 - I don't understand why B is not right?  [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2016, 07:18
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Wowgmat2016 wrote:
From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

Two choices:
(B) for a chard in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
(D) that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference

Why is B wrong? I dont quite understand the explanation ..

Thank you!


The substance of the proof is NOT "a card in the dealer's hand", but the fact that "subjects could identify". Therefore D is better than B.

[While posting, please include all the options in the question. You may please add other options in this post as well.]
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2016, 19:47
Hi,

I have one question here: how can we determine which the intended meaning is? I mean, it is also reasonable to think that Joseph was trying to justify the existence of people who can identify the card by using thought transference, right? So how can we confirm that it is not really the intended meaning of the sentence?

Thank for helping me!
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2016, 08:21
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thuyduong91vnu wrote:
Hi,

I have one question here: how can we determine which the intended meaning is? I mean, it is also reasonable to think that Joseph was trying to justify the existence of people who can identify the card by using thought transference, right? So how can we confirm that it is not really the intended meaning of the sentence?

Thank for helping me!


I would suggest not to bother too much over the "intended meaning" issue. You may safely follow the following:

It has not been mentioned in any official guideline that the correct answer must retain the meaning of the original sentence. If there is only one grammatically correct choice, it must be selected even when it deviates in meaning from the original. However if there are two grammatically correct sentences, select the one that agrees with the intended meaning of the original sentence (unless the original meaning is something absurd).
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2016, 21:16
sayantanc2k wrote:
thuyduong91vnu wrote:
Hi,

I have one question here: how can we determine which the intended meaning is? I mean, it is also reasonable to think that Joseph was trying to justify the existence of people who can identify the card by using thought transference, right? So how can we confirm that it is not really the intended meaning of the sentence?

Thank for helping me!


I would suggest not to bother too much over the "intended meaning" issue. You may safely follow the following:

It has not been mentioned in any official guideline that the correct answer must retain the meaning of the original sentence. If there is only one grammatically correct choice, it must be selected even when it deviates in meaning from the original. However if there are two grammatically correct sentences, select the one that agrees with the intended meaning of the original sentence (unless the original meaning is something absurd).


Hi sayantanc2k,

Thank for your response. I understand your point, but my question is just right here. As long as the original meaning is not something absurd, then we could properly remain it, right? So what is the problem with choice (A), I mean the meaning of choice (A) is "Joseph was trying to justify the existence of people who can identify the card by using thought transference", which is not something nonsense or unacceptable, isn't it? So why did we rule out this choice reasoning "It is not the intended meaning"?

Thank for your help!
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2016, 06:31
thuyduong91vnu wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
thuyduong91vnu wrote:
Hi,

I have one question here: how can we determine which the intended meaning is? I mean, it is also reasonable to think that Joseph was trying to justify the existence of people who can identify the card by using thought transference, right? So how can we confirm that it is not really the intended meaning of the sentence?

Thank for helping me!


I would suggest not to bother too much over the "intended meaning" issue. You may safely follow the following:

It has not been mentioned in any official guideline that the correct answer must retain the meaning of the original sentence. If there is only one grammatically correct choice, it must be selected even when it deviates in meaning from the original. However if there are two grammatically correct sentences, select the one that agrees with the intended meaning of the original sentence (unless the original meaning is something absurd).


Hi sayantanc2k,

Thank for your response. I understand your point, but my question is just right here. As long as the original meaning is not something absurd, then we could properly remain it, right? So what is the problem with choice (A), I mean the meaning of choice (A) is "Joseph was trying to justify the existence of people who can identify the card by using thought transference", which is not something nonsense or unacceptable, isn't it? So why did we rule out this choice reasoning "It is not the intended meaning"?

Thank for your help!


Option A could mean that Joseph claimed something for (on behalf of) the subjects - the claim was not for the subjects. The meaning is unrealistic in option A.
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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand


Answer analysis:

A) This sentence sounds pretty good other than the preposition "for," which usually indicates an intended recipient. Because the subjects of this experiment are not intended to receive, or benefit from, the results of the experiment, this does not make any logical sense. We also notice "for" being replaced in 3/5 of the answers.
B) Same issue as A. The card is neither the recipient nor the beneficiary of Rhine's claims.
C) Not bad, probably the second best choice, but the word order is suspect. It should say "to identify a card in the dealer's hand with thought transference." In other words, the direct object of the verb should precede the modifying prepositional phrases.
D) Correct. "By" is the best preposition to describe a method or process using a gerund (-ing). "I was able to find my brother by shouting his name into the crowd" sounds better than "I was able to find him with shouting." The "with" construction works only if "with" is preceded by a noun rather than a gerund. For example, "I was able to sink the free throw with a flick of my wrist."
E) "are capable to use" is incorrect. It should say "are capable of using."
--

Please note: as in many cases, the GMAC does not provide the best possible answer here. The best possible answer would use the template "proof of A who could use B to C." In other words, it would address the issue of word priority (placing key phrases earlier in the sentence) by placing the phrase "thought transference" earlier in the sentence.

Correct answer: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference.

Best answer(s): From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof of subjects able to use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand, or of subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2017, 23:57
If we vertically scan first few words of answer choices, we can see split of ‘for’ , ‘of’ and ‘that’. We use ‘that’ to state something.
Read the portion before underline part ‘claimed statistical proof’. Here we need ‘that’ because ‘parapsychologist Joshep Banks….’ is stating. Eliminate A, B and C.
In option E, ‘capable to’ is wrong idiom. Correct idiom is ‘capable of’. Eliminate E.

Hence C is the correct answer.
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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 14:54
From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand

- As Joshep Banks Rhine is claiming a proof here, the usage of "for" will be inappropriate if you read the entire sentence. Reading the sentence with "for" means we are explaining what the proof is for and not explaining what the proof is.

B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference

- As Joshep Banks Rhine is claiming a proof here, the usage of "for" will be inappropriate if you read the entire sentence. Reading the sentence with "for" means we are explaining what the proof is for and not explaining what the proof is.

C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand

- As Joshep Banks Rhine is claiming a proof here, the usage of "of" will be inappropriate if you read the entire sentence. Reading the sentence with "of" means we are explaining what the proof is of and not explaining what the proof is.

D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference

- CORRECT

E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand

"capable to use" is incorrect should be "capable of using"

Hence, Answer is D

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Re: From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2019, 03:52
thanhmaitran wrote:
From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.

A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand
B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference
C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand
D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference
E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand


It is possible to claim proof of something (He claims proof of ESP) or to claim proof that something is true (He claims proof that ESP is real). It is not appropriate to use claim proof for either of those things. Eliminate answers (A) and (B).
Rhine is trying to claim proof that something is true: the subjects are capable of ESP. He is not trying to claim proof of subjects themselves. Eliminate answer (C).Capable to is not a correct idiom. Eliminate answer (E).
OA:D

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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2019, 11:51
thanhmaitran wrote:
From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each bearing one of a set of symbols, parapsychologist Joshep Banks Rhine claimed statistical proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand.


A. for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand

Said simply, "From an experiment, the parapsychologist claimed proof for subjects who could use thought transference to identify a card in the dealer's hand." This is saying that the psychologist is claiming proof for subjects, who have the ability to use thought transference, to identify a card in the dealer's hand. Well, it's not totally bogus. This is saying that the subjects could use thought transference, not that they are using it in such an experiment. So I'm not crazy about the meaning here, but the other answers provide more context. Lets continue and see what else we can find.

B. for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference

"From an experiment, the parapsychologist claimed proof for a card in the dealer's hand to be identified by subjects with thought transference." In this context, the sentence says that "Joseph claimed proof for a card to be identified by subjects with thought transference." When we look at the modifier "subjects with thought transference," this shows us an unclear meaning. Do they mean that subjects, along with thought transference, together will identify a card? Or perhaps it means, subjects with this ability of thought transference can identify a card. Or in a possessive manner, subjects with thought transference can, while they take the train to work, identify a card. That is enough for me to eliminate B.

C. of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand

"From an experiment, the parapsychologist claimed proof of subjects able to identify with thought transference a card in the dealer's hand." This means that the parapsychologist was able to find proof, at some point in time, subjects were able to identify a card in the dealer's hand. This might as well say that the psychologist found proof, that in 20BC, subjects were able to identify a card in the dealer's hand. This doesn't show that this proof is a result of the experiment. C is out.

D. that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference

"From an experiment, the parapsychologist claimed proof that subjects could identify a card in the dealer's hand by using thought transference."

This is a decent choice. The psychologist claimed proof THAT X Y. Lets use it in its own example. From an experiment, I proved that cats eat dogs. This seems to be the most idiomatic of the bunch, and it solves the "with" error that B had. We'll see in just a second that E has some errors as well.

E. that subjects are capable to use thought transference for identifying a card in the dealer's hand

Without rephrasing the sentence, the meaning here says that the results of the experiment are that the parapsychologist now has evidence to prove that some subjects are capable of identifying a card using thought transference, which makes sense! But the idiom is "capable of."
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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b   [#permalink] 08 Aug 2019, 11:51
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From an experiment using special extrasensory perception cards, each b

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