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Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will

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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2011, 07:06
I went for B... But after going through the thread... I can say D is the right one... Subject of the sentence therefore whom.
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2011, 07:53
IMO D. Initially, I confused with A because the existence of 'whom'. But I can rephrase D is: one of presenters is blind. Presenter cannot replace by who. So, whom is needed here.
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New post 01 Dec 2011, 10:52
D because "one of them who is blind " indicate that this specific person will demonstrate which is not the case.
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New post 01 Dec 2011, 12:59
+1 D. "Whom" is the object pronoun needed
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New post 07 Dec 2011, 08:43
D because if one of whom is taken it indicates that the he only will demonstrate..but thats not true.
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2012, 11:56
pi10t wrote:
Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
(B) one of them who
(C) and one of them who
(D) one of whom
(E) one of which



I was confused between B and D.... I opted B...but can't understand my mistake,,
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2012, 12:59
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Maryam787 wrote:
pi10t wrote:
Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
(B) one of them who
(C) and one of them who
(D) one of whom
(E) one of which



I was confused between B and D.... I opted B...but can't understand my mistake,,

Hii Maryam.
In B, "who" is modifying "them" but since the helping verb after "who" is "is", we need a singular noun. Hence B is incorrect. Also there is one more mistake in B. Whenever you come across such sentences such as "one of X(Always Plural) who/that" always remember that verb to be followed has to be PLURAL.
In short:
One of X(Always Plural) who/that Y(Always Plural verb)
BUT
One of X(Always Plural) (Always Singular Verb)

Another major mistake in the question. "One of whom" and other options are incorrectly modifying "Seminar". This is a weird question. If it were "At the seminar the presenters, one of whom is blind, will bla bla bla", then it would have been right.
Hope that helps.
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2014, 01:35
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pi10t wrote:
Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
(B) one of them who
(C) and one of them who
(D) one of whom
(E) one of which



I want verification of my analysis .I approcached the sentence as under :

1. Understood the meaning that among the presenters , there is one person who is blind and he will demonstrate..
2.Broke the sentence into clauses:

C1:Presenters at the seminar, one
C2:who is blind,
C1 (contd):will demonstrate adaptive equipment
C3: that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

2. Clause 1 doest not make one will demonstrate .....

3. Applied rule that after preposition only object pronoun whom can come , so eliminated B, C.
4.Applied rule which can refer only inanimate objects.Hence eliminated ans E

4. Arrived at answer D.


Doubt:

1. Can which refer to animals ?/ As per my current understanding that and which can only refer to inanimate objects.
Hence, they cannot refer to animals.
2.Who / Whom can refer to only human being ? Can they refer to animals ?As per my current understanding who and whom can refer to both animals and human beings.
3.Is one 'a pronoun?
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Dec 2014, 02:03
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If you can replace it with they -> WHO
If you can replace it with them -> WHOM

... The kind of rules you ca find in the pill ...
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jan 2015, 05:02
pi10t wrote:
Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
(B) one of them who
(C) and one of them who
(D) one of whom
(E) one of which


A - 'one' can not refer back to presenters
C - 'and' distorts the meaning
E - 'which' cannot refer to people ('presenters' in this case)

Between B and D, I choose D because it is more concise. Also, whom is properly used as an object pronoun.
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2015, 05:33
Who refers to the subjective case while whom is refers to objective case.

Here since the blind person is object, therefore whom will be used.

Therefore the right answer is D.
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2018, 22:10
The subject, presenters, must be followed by a limiting appositive _ such as one of whom, that identifies an
individual from among a larger group. Choice D is best: one of whom best serves an appositive to the subject, presenters, because the phrase means "one from among several or many." Choice A, one who, is unacceptable because one who cannot refer to the plural presenters. Choices B and C are ungrammatical because who competes with one as the subject of is. Choice E employs which, a relative pronoun that does not refer to people (presenters), but only to things.
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New post 31 Jan 2018, 16:52
HI pi10t,

Thank you for your question. This is classic case of a "who vs. whom" sentence, so let's look at each answer and if they are conveying the proper meaning:

Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
By using "who," it now refers back to the word "seminar" and not to the presenters. The seminar can't be blind, so this is INCORRECT.

(B) one of them who
Again, by using "who," it refers back to the seminar being blind. It also adds in a vague pronoun "them" with no clear antecedent. Therefore, this one is also INCORRECT.

(C) and one of them who
This is the same answer as B, but with the word "and" added in. That doesn't fix the problems with who/whom or the vague pronoun "them," so it's INCORRECT.

(D) one of whom
This is the CORRECT answer because by using "whom," it's clear the phrase is referring back to one of the presenters being blind, not one of the seminars.

(E) one of which
This is INCORRECT because in the GMAT, one should never use "which" to refer to people - only animals or objects.
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New post 09 Nov 2018, 20:46
pi10t wrote:
Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
(B) one of them who
(C) and one of them who
(D) one of whom
(E) one of which



Marcab wrote:

Hii Maryam.
In B, "who" is modifying "them" but since the helping verb after "who" is "is", we need a singular noun. Hence B is incorrect. Also there is one more mistake in B. Whenever you come across such sentences such as "one of X(Always Plural) who/that" always remember that verb to be followed has to be PLURAL.
In short:
One of X(Always Plural) who/that Y(Always Plural verb)
BUT
One of X(Always Plural) (Always Singular Verb)

Another major mistake in the question. "One of whom" and other options are incorrectly modifying "Seminar". This is a weird question. If it were "At the seminar the presenters, one of whom is blind, will bla bla bla", then it would have been right.
Hope that helps.
-s



VeritasKarishma GMATNinja

Could you please explain why D is correct and B is wrong? I believe we should use "who" instead of "whom" since that pronoun is being used to modify the subject and not the object. Marcab 's explanation seems to make sense why B might be wrong but D seems to be wrong too because it uses "whom".
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2018, 14:58
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dabaobao wrote:
pi10t wrote:
Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
(B) one of them who
(C) and one of them who
(D) one of whom
(E) one of which



Marcab wrote:

Hii Maryam.
In B, "who" is modifying "them" but since the helping verb after "who" is "is", we need a singular noun. Hence B is incorrect. Also there is one more mistake in B. Whenever you come across such sentences such as "one of X(Always Plural) who/that" always remember that verb to be followed has to be PLURAL.
In short:
One of X(Always Plural) who/that Y(Always Plural verb)
BUT
One of X(Always Plural) (Always Singular Verb)

Another major mistake in the question. "One of whom" and other options are incorrectly modifying "Seminar". This is a weird question. If it were "At the seminar the presenters, one of whom is blind, will bla bla bla", then it would have been right.
Hope that helps.
-s



VeritasKarishma GMATNinja

Could you please explain why D is correct and B is wrong? I believe we should use "who" instead of "whom" since that pronoun is being used to modify the subject and not the object. Marcab 's explanation seems to make sense why B might be wrong but D seems to be wrong too because it uses "whom".

The question of whether to use "who" or "whom" isn't determined by what noun the pronoun refers to, but rather by the grammatical role the pronoun plays.

If the word is a subject (the "doer" of an action), we use "who." If the word is an object (the recipient of an action) we use "whom." For example, "My wife, who is extremely kind and generous, volunteers every Monday at a homeless shelter." Here, "who" is the subject of the verb "is."

But I could also write, "My wife, to whom I send flowers every day, is a wonderful person." In that last sentence, my wife is the object of the preposition, so she "receives" the action (sending flowers) -- and as a result, we'd need to use "whom" and not "who".

In (D) "whom" is the object of the preposition "of," so it's correct. In (B) "one of them who" is just plain bad. Why would we use back-to-back pronouns? Is "who" referring to "them?" To "one"? It's unnecessarily clunky and confusing.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Dec 2018, 22:01
GMATNinja wrote:
dabaobao wrote:
pi10t wrote:
Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will demonstrate adaptive equipment that allows visually impaired people to use computers.

(A) one who
(B) one of them who
(C) and one of them who
(D) one of whom
(E) one of which



Marcab wrote:

Hii Maryam.
In B, "who" is modifying "them" but since the helping verb after "who" is "is", we need a singular noun. Hence B is incorrect. Also there is one more mistake in B. Whenever you come across such sentences such as "one of X(Always Plural) who/that" always remember that verb to be followed has to be PLURAL.
In short:
One of X(Always Plural) who/that Y(Always Plural verb)
BUT
One of X(Always Plural) (Always Singular Verb)

Another major mistake in the question. "One of whom" and other options are incorrectly modifying "Seminar". This is a weird question. If it were "At the seminar the presenters, one of whom is blind, will bla bla bla", then it would have been right.
Hope that helps.
-s



VeritasKarishma GMATNinja

Could you please explain why D is correct and B is wrong? I believe we should use "who" instead of "whom" since that pronoun is being used to modify the subject and not the object. Marcab 's explanation seems to make sense why B might be wrong but D seems to be wrong too because it uses "whom".

The question of whether to use "who" or "whom" isn't determined by what noun the pronoun refers to, but rather by the grammatical role the pronoun plays.

If the word is a subject (the "doer" of an action), we use "who." If the word is an object (the recipient of an action) we use "whom." For example, "My wife, who is extremely kind and generous, volunteers every Monday at a homeless shelter." Here, "who" is the subject of the verb "is."

But I could also write, "My wife, to whom I send flowers every day, is a wonderful person." In that last sentence, my wife is the object of the preposition, so she "receives" the action (sending flowers) -- and as a result, we'd need to use "whom" and not "who".

In (D) "whom" is the object of the preposition "of," so it's correct. In (B) "one of them who" is just plain bad. Why would we use back-to-back pronouns? Is "who" referring to "them?" To "one"? It's unnecessarily clunky and confusing.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja I am a big fan of your verbal analysis response, and you are doing a great service for GMAT Club members.
I would like to ask one particular doubt that is simple but yet to settle down for me.
In the above example you quote "My wife, who is extremely kind and generous, volunteers every Monday at a homeless shelter." Here, "who" serves as subject within the non-essential clause and so it is followed by verb "is".
In the 2nd example that you quote "My wife, to whom I send flowers every day, is a wonderful person." , here in non-essential clause "whom" is the object of preposition, but the subject is "I" and the verb is "send".
Whereas in the OA, i.e., D "one of whom" is blind; what is the subject for which "whom" is required to be used as receiver of the action. Cant we consider the non-essential clause with a subject pronoun such as - "one who is blind".
I know you are a very busy person, but I hope you reply me as early as possible as next week I am having my exam.
Thank You.
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2019, 16:11
Quote:
I would like to ask one particular doubt that is simple but yet to settle down for me.
In the above example you quote "My wife, who is extremely kind and generous, volunteers every Monday at a homeless shelter." Here, "who" serves as subject within the non-essential clause and so it is followed by verb "is".
In the 2nd example that you quote "My wife, to whom I send flowers every day, is a wonderful person." , here in non-essential clause "whom" is the object of preposition, but the subject is "I" and the verb is "send".
Whereas in the OA, i.e., D "one of whom" is blind; what is the subject for which "whom" is required to be used as receiver of the action. Cant we consider the non-essential clause with a subject pronoun such as - "one who is blind".
I know you are a very busy person, but I hope you reply me as early as possible as next week I am having my exam.
Thank You.

Apologies for the slow response! I'm obviously too late to be helpful for you, but if it's any consolation, this particular issue is extremely rare on the GMAT.

Anytime we have a plural subject and want to modify some portion of this larger group, we'll introduce a phrase like "one of whom," or "some of which" to differentiate between the larger subject of the main clause and the smaller subject of the modifying clause. For example, "The paintings in the Louvre, one of which was defaced by a toddler with a paint gun, proved to be a disappointment to the tourist from Queens." The phrase "one of which" differentiates between the painting that was defaced by the toddler and the larger group introduced in the subject of the sentence.

However, the sentence "The paintings in the Louvre, one which was defaced by a toddler with a paint gun, proved to be a disappointment," isn't acceptable usage. A native speaker would instinctively feel that something is off about this construction, but the reason it's objectively problematic is that it's confusing. One of what? Without the "of" it's not entirely clear that I'm talking about a member of the group in the subject. Perhaps I've introduced a new group. At the very least, you'd have to reread the sentence a couple of times to get a handle on what the writer is trying to communicate, and on the GMAT, clarity trumps murkiness every time.

The same issue applies to your question. If we have "Presenters at the seminar, one of whom is blind..." the phrase "one of whom" indicates that we're talking about a member of the original group of presenters. If we have "Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind" it's not entirely clear that the "one" is a member of a larger group -- it's a confusing phrase, and it almost sounds like the seminar is blind.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Presenters at the seminar, one who is blind, will   [#permalink] 11 Jan 2019, 16:11

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