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The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages

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The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by XavierAlexander on 19 Sep 2017, 08:41, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2016, 07:54
XavierAlexander wrote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.


Cheers ! :punk


A - Out of scope, since the question does not say anything about the store owner falling short on inventory after an increase in sales
B - Stock of gardening accessories cannot be the only grounds for maximising profits. There will be other factors as well
C - People living in the town can always go somewhere else & buy it, this statement is out of scope too
D - Trap option, according to me. Although the question suggests that the nursery faces a shortage of fruit species, increase in sales by 30% might just be because of other plant species, or actually any other hidden variable included in the business costs
E - Fits. The option generalizes the business costs and suggests that they will not change much. Since operating cost is not increasing, the percentage value of sales will increase even after the inventory increases by only 10%

This is my thought process , and might be slightly confusing. Would appreciate if someone can post the OE.

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2016, 07:54
XavierAlexander wrote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.


Cheers ! :punk


A - Out of scope, since the question does not say anything about the store owner falling short on inventory after an increase in sales
B - Stock of gardening accessories cannot be the only grounds for maximising profits. There will be other factors as well
C - People living in the town can always go somewhere else & buy it, this statement is out of scope too
D - Trap option, according to me. Although the question suggests that the nursery faces a shortage of fruit species, increase in sales by 30% might just be because of other plant species, or actually any other hidden variable included in the business costs
E - Fits. The option generalizes the business costs and suggests that they will not change much. Since operating cost is not increasing, the percentage value of sales will increase even after the inventory increases by only 10%

This is my thought process , and might be slightly confusing. Would appreciate if someone can post the OE.

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 13:45
I have a doubt on option E. If the operating cost doesn't increase and the owner has 10% more to sell , his profits might increase but how does the sales increase . What I mean is he can only sell what he has (which is 10% more from before) . So his sales/revenue can go up only 10% , assuming that the price at which he sells remains the same.

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 10:04
I am torn between D and E - either of which seem traps to me.
D - it says other plants' sale is easily met, hence it is possible to maximize revenues. Fruit trees remain an issue.
E - okay, operating costs do not increase - but there is no mention of how the 20% extra demand is met (10% is already met; 30% was the base)
Picked D because I felt both weren't clear.
Any other explanation on E?Will be glad to know the flaw in reasoning :)

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 10:23
XavierAlexander wrote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.


Cheers ! :punk


Imo E

Premise 1: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species
Premise 2: He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years
Premise 3: He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period

Conclusion :Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Assumption : The inventory increase is sufficient to cater to the increased demand for the product and there is no extra cost involved .

E is essentially saying this .
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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 10:33
XavierAlexander wrote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.


Cheers ! :punk


I doubt the OA. If the seller is unable to meet the demands then how is he able to maximise the revenues?
Its the basics of economics, the maximisation occurs when we are able to conquer the "variables" involved.

Suppose the cost hasn't increased, but he hasn't been able to meet the demand then how can we say that the revenue is maximised?
Revenue will only be maximised only when the demand reaches the threshold, the point at which the demand won't increase and the time at which the revenues will become constant. But, here in this argument the revenues can be increased only if the demand is met.

I don't agree with the OA. Share the OE please.
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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 10:36
will go with D here ..
we are talking about "sales"..Profit is out of context here and so business cost ..i am not finding E apt here ;it is not indicating how the owner will increase the sales by increasing only 10 % of inventory
Expert please confirm..

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 10:37
how does he will be able to meet the customer requirement.........i think option E deals with only one part i.e. increase in revenue.

Any other explanation??

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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Hello,

I think that the OA is wrong. Kindly review the OA. I had a chat with sir IanStewart in the chatroom and he too was sure that the OA shouldn't be E. I marked "D" since it is the best bet.

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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Quote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.

well as far as i can understand a,b,c answers are redundant. Option d as mentioned in manhattan cr is a " no tie to the conclusion "answer. Clearly we have to strengthen the conclusion here. As mentioned in option d most of increased sales will be from other than the fruit plants. Now there is a confusion between revenue and sales. Most of the times we think that revenue = sales, but in business terms revenue = total sales. As mentioned in option d the increased sales will be from other than fruit trees and the conclusion speaks about strengthening the revenues. So clearly we have no idea about the total sales in next five years from the mentioned answer. So no tie to the conclusion.
In option E if i consider the equation
profit = revenue - cost.
Case 1 . not able to meet customer demands
here profit is P1, Revenue is R1 and Cost is C1.
Case 2 : Increased revenues and able to meet customer demands
i am assuming here that this time the seller will see increased profits by the above mentioned conditions
Lets call this profit P2
so P2=R2-C2
according to him the increased inventory of 10 percent will be able to compensate for 30 percent increased sales (((which will contribute to revenue)).
e says the cost C2 remains constant. So clearly R2 has to increase and hence the conclusion is strenghtened

hope it helps :)

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 11:56
Ravindra.here wrote:
Quote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.

well as far as i can understand a,b,c answers are redundant. Option d as mentioned in manhattan cr is a " no tie to the conclusion "answer. Clearly we have to strengthen the conclusion here. As mentioned in option d most of increased sales will be from other than the fruit plants. Now there is a confusion between revenue and sales. Most of the times we think that revenue = sales, but in business terms revenue = total sales. As mentioned in option d the increased sales will be from other than fruit trees and the conclusion speaks about strengthening the revenues. So clearly we have no idea about the total sales in next five years from the mentioned answer. So no tie to the conclusion.
In option E if i consider the equation
profit = revenue - cost.
Case 1 . not able to meet customer demands
here profit is P1, Revenue is R1 and Cost is C1.
Case 2 : Increased revenues and able to meet customer demands
i am assuming here that this time the seller will see increased profits by the above mentioned conditions
Lets call this profit P2
so P2=R2-C2
according to him the increased inventory of 10 percent will be able to compensate for 30 percent increased sales (((which will contribute to revenue)).
e says the cost C2 remains constant. So clearly R2 has to increase and hence the conclusion is strenghtened

hope it helps :)


Hello,

Thanks for posting your views, but I don't agree with your explanation.

1. Profit maximisation is not equal to revenue maximisation.
P=R-C
We need to maximise R not P. Out of the 3 variables we know only about 1 variable "C". We don't know anything about "R".

2. As per the highlighted part of your comment, we can't be too sure about that since the premise NEVER says that this new 30% increase in demand will be met by this 10% increase in inventory. There is a missing link here.
We just know one thing that Initially the demand for most popular fruit tree is more than the supply. We don't know anything about the increased demand (which particular fruits/plants will have increased demand. THE PREMISE EXPLICITLY STATES THE OVERALL DEMAND.) nor we know anything about the 10% increase in inventory.

Example: The most demanded fruit's demand increases to 30% and the demand for all other plants remains constant. The inventory for other plants increase by 10% but the inventory for most demanded fruit doesn't increase. THEN HOW CAN WE SAY THAT WE MAXIMISED OUR REVENUES. THERE IS STILL SCOPE FOR MAXIMISATION.

Its absolute, that in order to maximise a quantity a threshold has to be reached.


Either you see this question mathematically (as in point 1) or you see this question logically (as in point 2), OPTION "E" WILL NEVER SUFFICE THE ARGUMENT AT HAND.

P.S. We just can't assume anything out of the given information. We need not bring any outside world knowledge into solving the GMAT questions. If we start assuming things, each person will have his own version of assumption and that way we won't be able to reach a solution.
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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 12:36
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Quote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.

well as far as i can understand a,b,c answers are redundant. Option d as mentioned in manhattan cr is a " no tie to the conclusion "answer. Clearly we have to strengthen the conclusion here. As mentioned in option d most of increased sales will be from other than the fruit plants. Now there is a confusion between revenue and sales. Most of the times we think that revenue = sales, but in business terms revenue = total sales. As mentioned in option d the increased sales will be from other than fruit trees and the conclusion speaks about strengthening the revenues. So clearly we have no idea about the total sales in next five years from the mentioned answer. So no tie to the conclusion.
In option E if i consider the equation
profit = revenue - cost.
Case 1 . not able to meet customer demands
here profit is P1, Revenue is R1 and Cost is C1.
Case 2 : Increased revenues and able to meet customer demands
i am assuming here that this time the seller will see increased profits by the above mentioned conditions
Lets call this profit P2
so P2=R2-C2
according to him the increased inventory of 10 percent will be able to compensate for 30 percent increased sales (((which will contribute to revenue)).
e says the cost C2 remains constant. So clearly R2 has to increase and hence the conclusion is strenghtened

hope it helps :)


Hello,

Thanks for posting your views, but I don't agree with your explanation.

1. Profit maximisation is not equal to revenue maximisation.
P=R-C
We need to maximise R not P. Out of the 3 variables we know only about 1 variable "C". We don't know anything about "R".

2. As per the highlighted part of your comment, we can't be too sure about that since the premise NEVER says that this new 30% increase in demand will be met by this 10% increase in inventory. There is a missing link here.
We just know one thing that Initially the demand for most popular fruit tree is more than the supply. We don't know anything about the increased demand (which particular fruits/plants will have increased demand. THE PREMISE EXPLICITLY STATES THE OVERALL DEMAND.) nor we know anything about the 10% increase in inventory.

Example: The most demanded fruit's demand increases to 30% and the demand for all other plants remains constant. The inventory for other plants increase by 10% but the inventory for most demanded fruit doesn't increase. THEN HOW CAN WE SAY THAT WE MAXIMISED OUR REVENUES. THERE IS STILL SCOPE FOR MAXIMISATION.

Its absolute, that in order to maximise a quantity a threshold has to be reached.

Either you see this question mathematically (as in point 1) or you see this question logically (as in point 2), OPTION "E" WILL NEVER SUFFICE THE ARGUMENT AT HAND.

P.S. We just can't assume anything out of the given information. We need not bring any outside world knowledge into solving the GMAT questions. If we start assuming things, each person will have his own version of assumption and that way we won't be able to reach a solution.


Well lets see the p.s. part is too extreme. :)
When i read cr bible it mentioned two kinds of assumptions 1. defenders and supporters. Defenders are assumptions that provide bridge and supporters remove inadequacies. For a given argument there can be so many assumptions , may be your assumptions are different than mine. But that doesnt necessarily concedes that any assumption is wrong if it properly bridges the gap between a premise and a conclusion. As far as my explanation is concerned , the part highlighted in which i assumed , i dont think its an outside information . Its a simple assumption i made from the given text in the argument.
About the other highlighted part , you said that the premise never said that ""new 30% increase in demand will be met by this 10% increase in inventory. There is a missing link here""
Well if you read my highlighted text i am just giving that missing link . Ofcourse its never stated (( never a extreme word)) sorry for pointing out but the test prep company i am preparing with , asks me to use extreme words as little as possible till the gmat is over :) . I am just joining the missing links here. Thats what assumptions are (( missing links )) so
that the conclusion can be achieved . also as mentioned i cannot see ""overall demand"" in the argument .
As far as the other text related to maximization is concerned that"s termed as " REAL WORLD DISTRACTION " errors as mentioned in manhattan cr wrong answers chapter. Still more scope for maximisation that will be outside information or new information or outside assumption according to me.
You mentioned ""Its absolute, that in order to maximise a quantity a threshold has to be reached.""
if i go with that manipulation then lets say that threshold is the profit that is same in both the cases as i have mentioned
now again p=r-c
if p is same in both the cases then as mentioned in option e if costs are constant in case 2 then r will be maximized to achieve that same profit.
Maybe i have explained it or maybe not .
:)

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 12:43
Hi, I was wondering why is D incorrect and E correct? I am not able to understand the reasoning behind D. Could one of the experts please explain to me? Would greatly appreciate it!

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 12:59
Ravindra.here wrote:
Well lets see the p.s. part is too extreme. :)
When i read cr bible it mentioned two kinds of assumptions 1. defenders and supporters. Defenders are assumptions that provide bridge and supporters remove inadequacies. For a given argument there can be so many assumptions , may be your assumptions are different than mine. But that doesnt necessarily concedes that any assumption is wrong if it properly bridges the gap between a premise and a conclusion. As far as my explanation is concerned , the part highlighted in which i assumed , i dont think its an outside information . Its a simple assumption i made from the given text in the argument.
About the other highlighted part , you said that the premise never said that ""new 30% increase in demand will be met by this 10% increase in inventory. There is a missing link here""
Well if you read my highlighted text i am just giving that missing link . Ofcourse its never stated (( never a extreme word)) sorry for pointing out but the test prep company i am preparing with , asks me to use extreme words as little as possible till the gmat is over :) . I am just joining the missing links here. Thats what assumptions are (( missing links )) so
that the conclusion can be achieved . also as mentioned i cannot see ""overall demand"" in the argument .
As far as the other text related to maximization is concerned that"s termed as " REAL WORLD DISTRACTION " errors as mentioned in manhattan cr wrong answers chapter. Still more scope for maximisation that will be outside information or new information or outside assumption according to me.
You mentioned ""Its absolute, that in order to maximise a quantity a threshold has to be reached.""
if i go with that manipulation then lets say that threshold is the profit that is same in both the cases as i have mentioned
now again p=r-c
if p is same in both the cases then as mentioned in option e if costs are constant in case 2 then r will be maximized to achieve that same profit.
Maybe i have explained it or maybe not .
:)


Hi,
Yup i am also not using any extreme language that's why in favour of "D" that uses the word "most" :)
Coming back to your explanation:
How can you assume P is same in different cases, when the premise never talks about profit. In fact not even the option talks about profit.

In my understanding there are two things that we need to take care of as a seller:
1. Demand = Supply
2. Maximisation of revenue

when you say that ->
Ravindra.here wrote:
Case 1 . not able to meet customer demands
here profit is P1, Revenue is R1 and Cost is C1. -> If he is unable to meet the demand then the conclusion falls apart, thus weakening the argument
Case 2 : Increased revenues and able to meet customer demands
i am assuming here that this time the seller will see increased profits by the above mentioned conditions -> again i will say we can't assume the increased profits. We don't have any such information. The seller states his conclusion when he says that 10% will be able to meet 30% increase in demand. How can you assume anything about profit from this statement?
Lets call this profit P2
so P2=R2-C2
according to him the increased inventory of 10 percent will be able to compensate for 30 percent increased sales (((which will contribute to revenue)).

e says the cost C2 remains constant "This is the biggest mistake in your statement. Option "E" never saya that the cost remains constatnt. It states that the business costs will not increase with a percentage equal to the percentage of inventory increase. For example if I say the cost of biscuit didn't increase by 20% over the past 3 years, it doesn't mean the cost remained constant. It means it could have increased by any percentage less than 20%". So clearly R2 has to increase and hence the conclusion is strenghtened -> So clearly your explanation has loopholes.


In my opinion, a correct answer is the one that adheres to both the expectations of seller:
1. Demand = Supply
2. Maximisation of revenue

Option "E" never talks about the demand and supply. OPTION "E" CAN NEVER BE THE OA. I already got this confirmed with sir Ian Stewart, renowned GMAT tutor.

Hope that helps.
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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 08:23
XavierAlexander wrote:
The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages and cannot meet consumer demand for the most popular fruit tree species. He expects overall sales at the nursery to increase 30% over the next five years. He predicts an increase in plant inventory of only 10% over that period. Nevertheless, he is confident that this increase is sufficient to meet his customers’ demand and maximise revenue.

Which of the following, if true, provides the strongest grounds for the nursery owner’s confidence?

A. By ordering from different suppliers, the nursery owner can achieve the 10% increase in inventory without sacrificing profits.
B. The nursery owner also plans a 10% increase in his stock of gardening accessories.
C. In the town where the nursery is located, it is the only retail store selling plants.
D. Most of the projected increase in sales will be sales of species other than fruit trees.
E. The 10% increase in the nursery’s inventory can be achieved without an equal increase in the business’s costs.


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I chose option D by POE. I do not agree with OA- E . Can you please enlighten here?
In my opinion , Option E would have been correct if argument stated that overall profit at the nursery is expected to increase 30 % over 5 years with only 10 % increase in inventory. In that case E would make sense .
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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2017, 17:49
Was there ever any resolution on this question?

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2017, 10:02
XavierAlexander, Hello- That cheers emoji is distracting.
Thanks,
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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2017, 09:56
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Hey everyone - sorry to be so late in discovering this thread, but since this is one of our questions I should clarify. We have the official answer as D (as it looks like most of you, do, too). That "E" in the initial post must just be a typo.

One of the important lessons on this one is that details in adjectives and modifiers really matter on Critical Reasoning questions. If you fixate on the phrase "for the most popular fruit tree species" (that's where the inventory shortages come from), that means that there are not necessarily shortages for any other type of plant, allowing plenty of revenue growth to come from those others.
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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2017, 23:19
This is good to know! Relieved :)

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Re: The owner of a plant nursery experiences frequent stock shortages   [#permalink] 18 Sep 2017, 23:19
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