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The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually

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Re: The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 16:56
DmitryFarber wrote:
OreoShake, while I agree that the commas are overdone in D, it's also true that there are very few absolute rules in English grammar! Like it or not, sometimes writers--even GMAT writers!--will insert a comma that doesn't seem necessary. Remember that commas can serve to indicate a pause in speaking and are sometimes used to break up a sentence for greater clarity. Honestly, I was tempted to put a comma before "and are sometimes" in that last sentence, even though it's not the standard! (What do you think? Would it have made the sentence easier to read?) For a good example of a "stray" comma in an official question, see this post (including my comments): https://gmatclub.com/forum/covering-71- ... 06346.html


While, I picked D cuz the meaning in (a) the better grammatical sentence was poor. I have a bit of an issue with putting a conjunction (and) changing the verb tense and having no subject before it.

Is this allowed in English? I always thought when you do parallelism you had to keep the same tense. So normally, in English when I change tense I would have put an "IT" before has made.

https://webapps.towson.edu/ows/shifts.htm


My corrected sentence would be:

The rare bird was considered extinct for over fifty years, but it was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, and, over the past decade, it has made a remarkable comeback.
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Re: The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 17:02
ankurgupta03 wrote:
The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.

1 The rare bird, considered extinct for fifty years and actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.
2 The rare bird, which had been considered extinct for over fifty years but it was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.
3 The rare bird, which was considered extinct for over fifty years and had actually been thriving in a remote part of the Andes, made a remarkable comeback over the past decade
4 The rare bird was considered extinct for over fifty years, but it was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, and, over the past decade, has made a remarkable comeback.
5 The rare bird was considered extinct for over fifty years, was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, and, over the past decade, has made an remarkable comeback.

A conditional clause is required, hence choices not containing but can be removed, so ACE can be removed.
between B and D, D wins due to parallelism. In B "it" is not required.


Why is it not required? We changed tenses and we used a conjunction. I always thought when you change verb tenses that you need to add the subject back in to be clear.

However, I picked D because the meaning was crystal clear unlike A but I am not 100% happy with D and I think it contains an error that the actual GMAT wouldn't have.
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Re: The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 17:06
OreoShake wrote:
Whenever I am assured I have learnt something absolute in sentence correction, some gmat question creates ambiguity yet again.

As per my understanding, whenever we have a comma+conjunction form, it indicates the beginning of a new clause, meaning the noun/pronoun+verb form must exist.

In the correct answer choice, we find that after 'part of the Andes' comma+conjunction form is present, indicating that there should be clause following the conjunction. However we find no clause but rather "........., and, over the past decade, has made a remarkable comeback." Where is the subject/noun/pronoun ? For D to be correct, there must be no comma prior to 'and'.

I request an expert to help me with this predicament.


On top of that in (D). I thought parallelism typically means that you don't change the tense. So I am not sure if D is correct even if you drop the comma. I also believe you're rule is correct.

I do think (D) is the best of the 5 still. But I do agree that this seems to be an error.
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Re: The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2017, 08:03
This question hinges on the trick: VERB tense isn't an ISSUE.

The real hidden issues are:

* (1) essential vs non-essential modifier. (If you don't know these, Google is your friend)
* (2) parallelism within (1), preferrably showing contrast

Here it is obvious that the modifier "considered extinct for over fifty years and actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes" is ESSENTIAL as to explain the "remarkable comeback". "Extinct for over fifty years" and "actually thriving in a remote part of Andes" are contrasting points. It's preferred here to use a contrasting conjunction such as "yet", but", "however", "despite x, y" and etc..

The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.

1 The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.
=> Essential Modifier
No preferred contrast => Eliminate
2 The rare bird, which had been considered extinct for over fifty years but it was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.
=> ", which" is an Non-Essential modifier => Eliminate
Shows contrast
3 The rare bird, which was considered extinct for over fifty years and had actually been thriving in a remote part of the Andes, made a remarkable comeback over the past decade
=> ", which" is an Non-Essential modifier => Eliminate
No preferred contrast => Eliminate
4 The rare bird was considered extinct for over fifty years, but it was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, and, over the past decade, has made a remarkable comeback.
Modifier went into the actual sentence, by definition ESSENTIAL
Shows contrast
5 The rare bird was considered extinct for over fifty years, was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, and, over the past decade, has made an remarkable comeback.
Modifier went into the actual sentence, by definition ESSENTIAL
No preferred contrast => Eliminate
Bonus Mistake: "remarkable comback" is a consequence of "actually thriving" thus those cannot be stated in equal priority - parallel.

Answer:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
The D

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Re: The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2017, 05:18
fozzzy wrote:
The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.

1 The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.
2 The rare bird, which had been considered extinct for over fifty years but it was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, has made a remarkable comeback over the past decade.
3 The rare bird, which was considered extinct for over fifty years and had actually been thriving in a remote part of the Andes, made a remarkable comeback over the past decade
4 The rare bird was considered extinct for over fifty years, but it was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, and, over the past decade, has made a remarkable comeback.
5 The rare bird was considered extinct for over fifty years, was actually thriving in a remote part of the Andes, and, over the past decade, has made an remarkable comeback.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
How would you split this sentence into its clauses?


Hello :)
I excluded A C and E because the coordinating words were not coherent with the meaning of the sentence.
However between B and D I excluded B solely based on the fact that "but" was not preceded by a comma: is this logic correct?

thank you!
Re: The rare bird, considered extinct for over fifty years and actually   [#permalink] 24 Dec 2017, 05:18

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