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A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely

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A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2008, 17:54
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A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely related plants that thrive in soil with
high concentrations of metals that are toxic to most other plants. Agronomists studying
the herb have discovered that it produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Possibly, therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils, a hypothesis
that would gain support if ______.
A. histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers
B. the herb’s high level of histidine production is found to be associated with an
unusually low level of production of other amino acids
C. others of the closely related group of plants are also found to produce histidine in
large quantities
D. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an
extended period, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic
E. the concentration of histidine in the growing herb declines as the plant approaches
maturity

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2008, 20:42
I'm confused as the reasoning doesn't stand out.

I'm guessing C as it provides support to the hypothesis.
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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2008, 21:18
E for me.

The concentration of histidine declines when the plant reaches its maturity. This means the histidine is key to the plant's growth, as the hypothesis states.

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2008, 21:25
madsun wrote:
E for me.

The concentration of histidine declines when the plant reaches its maturity. This means the histidine is key to the plant's growth, as the hypothesis states.


As I understand, the hypothesis is not about growth, its about the fact that these plants can thrive on poisonous soil.
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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2008, 21:26
is it A?
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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2008, 23:51
Agronomists have discovered large amounts of histidine that, in herb, renders the metals chemically inert, allowing the herb to grow in metal-rich soils.

Yes, histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers.
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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 02:00
arorag wrote:
A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely related plants that thrive in soil with
high concentrations of metals that are toxic to most other plants. Agronomists studying
the herb have discovered that it produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Possibly, therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils, a hypothesis
that would gain support if ______.
A. histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers -
B. the herb’s high level of histidine production is found to be associated with an
unusually low level of production of other amino acids-
C. others of the closely related group of plants are also found to produce histidine in
large quantities-
D. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an
extended period, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic
E. the concentration of histidine in the growing herb declines as the plant approaches
maturity


SINCE OTHER MEMBERS OF THE GROUP ALSO THRIVE IN METAL-RICH CONDITIONS AND IF THEY ARE KNOWN TO PRODUCE 'HISTIDINE'(WHICH 'C' STATES) ,"HISTIDINE" IS THE REASON WHY THE PLANTS GROW IN METAL-RICH SOILS

IMO C

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 03:30
I was confused between C and E. I will go for E.

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 05:29
arorag wrote:
A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely related plants that thrive in soil with
high concentrations of metals that are toxic to most other plants. Agronomists studying
the herb have discovered that it produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Possibly, therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils, a hypothesis
that would gain support if ______.
A. histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers
B. the herb’s high level of histidine production is found to be associated with an
unusually low level of production of other amino acids
C. others of the closely related group of plants are also found to produce histidine in
large quantities
D. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an
extended period, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic
E. the concentration of histidine in the growing herb declines as the plant approaches
maturity

Answer must be D.

histidine make the metals inert. So cultivating herb in the soil for some time will neutralize all the concentration of metal & hence other plants can also grow in that soil.

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 07:11
prateek11587 wrote:
arorag wrote:
A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely related plants that thrive in soil with
high concentrations of metals that are toxic to most other plants. Agronomists studying
the herb have discovered that it produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Possibly, therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils, a hypothesis
that would gain support if ______.
A. histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers -
B. the herb’s high level of histidine production is found to be associated with an
unusually low level of production of other amino acids-
C. others of the closely related group of plants are also found to produce histidine in
large quantities-
D. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an
extended period
, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic
E. the concentration of histidine in the growing herb declines as the plant approaches
maturity


SINCE OTHER MEMBERS OF THE GROUP ALSO THRIVE IN METAL-RICH CONDITIONS AND IF THEY ARE KNOWN TO PRODUCE 'HISTIDINE'(WHICH 'C' STATES) ,"HISTIDINE" IS THE REASON WHY THE PLANTS GROW IN METAL-RICH SOILS

IMO C


the argument do not discuss about "OTHER" GROUP OF PLANT, but about the herb. C is out of scope.

E is totallly wrong!

D is opposit to "metals that are toxic to most other plants"
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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2008, 07:25
C is correct. The author is not just talking about this particular herb but is talking about all the closely related herbs. This is clear from the 1st sentence where he uses "thrive" instead of "thrives".
Therefore, what would be more clear proof of the hypothesis than this that all the closely related herbs also produce high levels of histidine! If they do, then it would prove beyond doubt that histidine is not the effect of exposure to toxic metals but is in fact a coping mechanism of the plant, as the agronomists have hypothesized.

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 14:11
I'd go with C. What's the source of the Q?

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 15:03
arorag wrote:
A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely related plants that thrive in soil with
high concentrations of metals that are toxic to most other plants. Agronomists studying
the herb have discovered that it produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Possibly, therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils, a hypothesis
that would gain support if ______.
A. histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers
B. the herb’s high level of histidine production is found to be associated with an
unusually low level of production of other amino acids
C. others of the closely related group of plants are also found to produce histidine in
large quantities
D. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an
extended period, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic
E. the concentration of histidine in the growing herb declines as the plant approaches
maturity


holy crap! the answers are all over the place. I picked D and here is my reasoning

H renders these toxic chemicals inert in test tube

Hypothesis is High H production allows the plant to grow in meta rich soils.

A B & C were never in the contention for me.

D is saying that over a time period this herb will make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic. So H rendered these toxic metals useless and a phenomenon observed in test tubes is officially supported. Yay!

E is saying that concentration of H decreases as plant approaches maturity. So, its telling me that H is fighting with toxic metals and is helping the plant grow. How ever, what happens after the plant matures? Define maturity here? Is the concentration of H good enough to keep fighting or the plant will whittle?

I feel that D is a stronger statement

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 15:34
The sixth sense is needed to answer this question.

I go with B

whats the OA
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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 19:02
arorag wrote:
A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely related plants that thrive in soil with
high concentrations of metals that are toxic to most other plants. Agronomists studying
the herb have discovered that it produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Possibly, therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils, a hypothesis
that would gain support if ______.

A. histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers -> this does not support,its just a fact ,nowhere quantity of H is in discussion

B. the herb’s high level of histidine production is found to be associated with an unusually low level of production of other amino acids-> nowhere quantity of H is in discussion

C. others of the closely related group of plants are also found to produce histidine in large quantities -> this is irrelevant we want to talk about herbs not not others

D. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an extended period, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic -> perfect SINCE the premise which says H makes metals less toxic is strengthend by this option

E. the concentration of histidine in the growing herb declines as the plant approaches maturity -> this is OOS

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 19:26
The herb is one of a closely related group of plants. Therefore, C is not out of scope. The author wants to know which statement will support their hypothesis that Histidine is the reason why the herb grows in toxic conditions. If all related plants that grow in toxic conditions have high conc. of histidine, then histidine must be the reason why the plants grow in toxic conditions.
I would still endorse C.

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2008, 22:19
arorag wrote:
A certain cultivated herb is one of a group of closely related plants that thrive in soil with
high concentrations of metals that are toxic to most other plants. Agronomists studying
the herb have discovered that it produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Possibly, therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils, a hypothesis
that would gain support if ______.
A. histidine is found in all parts of the plant—roots, stem, leaves, and flowers
B. the herb’s high level of histidine production is found to be associated with an
unusually low level of production of other amino acids
C. others of the closely related group of plants are also found to produce histidine in
large quantities
D. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an
extended period, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic
E. the concentration of histidine in the growing herb declines as the plant approaches
maturity


Hypothesis: The herb produces large amounts of histidine, an amino acid that,
in test-tube solutions, renders these metals chemically inert. Therefore, the
herb’s high histidine production is what allows it to grow in metal-rich soils.

We need something that will bolster the above statements. (D) serves that purpose. cultivation of the herb in soil with high concentrations of the metals will, over an extended period, make the soil suitable for plants to which the metals are toxic. This shows that, the herb's histidine makes the metals inert and when other plants (affected by metal's toxicity) are cultivated on the same soil, the metals do not react (rendered inert by herb's histidine) and the plants thrive.

Hence (D)
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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2008, 20:51
Very tough for me....
OA is E, question comes from GMAT SETS

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Re: CR: Herb [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2008, 21:31
E ? Doesn't sound very logical to me..
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Re: CR: Herb   [#permalink] 02 Oct 2008, 21:31
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