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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen

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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2017, 07:32
2
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

73% (00:58) correct 27% (00:54) wrong based on 117 sessions

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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to wealthy private collectors. Consequently, since thieves steal what their customers are most interested in buying, museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces.
The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?

(A) Art thieves steal both valuable and not-so valuable art.
(B) Art pieces that are not very valuable are not very much in demand by wealthy private collectors.
(C) Art thieves steal primarily from museums that are poorly secured.
(D) Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art.
(E) Wealthy private collectors sometimes sell their stolen art to other wealthy private collectors.
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2017, 09:58
1
rs47 wrote:
Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to wealthy private collectors. Consequently, since thieves steal what their customers are most interested in buying, museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces.
The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?

(A) Art thieves steal both valuable and not-so valuable art.
(B) Art pieces that are not very valuable are not very much in demand by wealthy private collectors.
(C) Art thieves steal primarily from museums that are poorly secured.
(D) Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art.
(E) Wealthy private collectors sometimes sell their stolen art to other wealthy private collectors.


Option B negated does nothing to conclusion but does go against the premise.
Option C negated goes against the conclusion.

Looking forward to OA.
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Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 03 Apr 2017, 05:12
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The argument makes a scope shift from what wealthy private collectors value to the valuable pieces in the museum.

So, the correct one must connect this gap - select B.
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Originally posted by godot53 on 03 Apr 2017, 04:09.
Last edited by godot53 on 03 Apr 2017, 05:12, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2017, 04:51
It should be B. The conclusion is more focus on security of 'valuable pieces'. If it were C, valuable pieces would not have been mentioned in the argument.

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Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2017, 09:53
Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen art is sold to wealthy private collectors. Consequently, since thieves steal what their customers are most interested in buying, museums ought to focus more of their security on their most valuable pieces.
The argument depends on assuming which one of the following?

(A) Art thieves steal both valuable and not-so valuable art.
(B) Art pieces that are not very valuable are not very much in demand by wealthy private collectors.
(C) Art thieves steal primarily from museums that are poorly secured.
(D) Most museums provide the same amount of security for valuable and not-so-valuable art.
(E) Wealthy private collectors sometimes sell their stolen art to other wealthy private collectors.

Assumption is something that connects the premise with the conclusion.

Prethinking:Why will the museum increase the security of only the valueable paintins and not the non valueable paintings? And Since the theives steal those painting which have buyers then that would mean that the buyers are only intrested in stealing valueable paintings.Option B correctly address that point and is the correct answer.
Re: Art theft from museums is on the rise. Most stolen &nbs [#permalink] 03 Apr 2017, 09:53
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