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QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine

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QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 222: Critical Reasoning


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Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine that is most popular among gardeners in North America is jackmanii. This belief is apparently correct since, of the one million clematis plants sold per year by the largest clematis nursery in North America, ten percent are jackmanii.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis
(B) The largest clematis nursery in North America sells nothing but clematis plants
(C) Some of the jackmanii sold by the nursery are sold to gardeners outside North America
(D) Most North American gardeners grow clematis in their gardens
(E) For all nurseries in North America that specialize in clematis, at least 10% of the clematis plants they sell are jackmanii.


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QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 06:59
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The conclusion of this passage is that the gardener's belief--that jackmanii is the most popular variety of clematis vine among gardeners in North America (NA)--is apparently correct. The word "apparently" is very important here. The conclusion would be substantially different if we were to replace "apparently" with "definitely".

More on that in a moment... but first, why does the author conclude that the belief is apparently correct?

  • The largest clematis nursery in NA sells one million clematis plants per year.
  • Of the one million clematis plants sold per year by that nursery, ten percent are jackmanii.

A substantial chunk of the clematis plants sold at the largest nursery are jackmanii. The author reasons that jackmanii's popularity at the largest nursery is a good indicator of its popularity among NA gardeners.

But what about the other 90%? What if another variety of clematis accounts for MORE than 10% of the one million? In that case, jackmanii would not be the most popular variety at the nursery. However, if no other variety accounts for 10% (or more) of the one million, then jackmanii would be in fact be the most popular variety at the nursery.

Would that prove that jackmanii is the most popular variety in NA? Not necessarily. But if jackmanii is #1 at the largest nursery, that's certainly EVIDENCE that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Again, we are trying to conclude that the belief is APPARENTLY correct, not that the believe is DEFINITELY correct. As long as we have evidence that jackmanii is the most popular variety among NA gardeners, we're in good shape.

With that in mind, let's look at the answer choices:

Quote:
(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis

If the nursery sells 10 varieties or fewer, then there would HAVE to be another variety that accounts for more than 10% of the one million plants sold at the nursery. If that were true, then jackmanii could not be the most popular variety at the nursery. Thus, we would not have evidence that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Without choice (A), the argument falls apart.

Now, does choice (A) PROVE that jackmanii is #1 at the nursery? Not at all... even with 20 varieties, there could be another type that accounts for more than 10% of the million. That, of course, would ruin the argument.

Even if choice (A) is true, the argument may or may not be valid, but that's okay. In other words, choice (A) doesn't PROVE that the author's reasoning is sound. But without choice (A), the author's argument could not be valid. This is a required assumption, so keep (A).

Quote:
(B) The largest clematis nursery in North America sells nothing but clematis plants

The nursery could sell many other types of plants. As long as jackmanii is the most popularity variety of clematis plant sold at the nursery, then the author's reasoning holds up. This is not a required assumption, so eliminate (B).

Quote:
(C) Some of the jackmanii sold by the nursery are sold to gardeners outside North America

If a substantial portion of jackmanii sales were to gardeners outside of NA, then we might have a problem. That might suggest that jackmanii's popularity at the nursery is NOT a good indicator of jackmanii's popularity among NA gardeners.

Choice (C) only says that SOME of the jackmanii are sold to gardeners outside of NA. In that case, the jackmanii sales at the nursery are probably a good indicator of its popularity among NA gardeners.

Does that make (C) a REQUIRED assumption? If (C) were not true and the nursery ONLY sold jackmanii to gardeners within NA, then that would probably further strengthen the argument. That would give us even more reason to believe that the sales at the nursery are a good indicator of NA popularity. Choice (C) is not a required assumption, so eliminate (C).

Quote:
(D) Most North American gardeners grow clematis in their gardens

It doesn't matter whether clematis is a popular plant in general. The belief is that jackmanii is the most popular variety OF clematis. Even if only a tiny fraction of NA gardeners grow clematis, jackmanii could still be the most popular variety among those gardeners who DO grow clematis. Eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) For all nurseries in North America that specialize in clematis, at least 10% of the clematis plants they sell are jackmanii.

This is admittedly a little bit tempting: sure, it would strengthen the argument. But this isn't a strengthen question: we need to know whether this is NECESSARY to draw the conclusion.

And it isn't necessary: even if (E) is NOT true -- for example, if jackmanii accounts for less than 10% of clematis plants at a few nurseries -- it's still possible that jackmanii is the most popular. And since (E) isn't necessary, it's not the correct answer.

(A) is the best answer.
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 07:44
I think its would be E
it has to assume all nurseries sell at least 10% jacmanii otherwise it wont be popular
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 08:24
Question Type: Assumption

Argument: Out of a million clematis plants sold, 10% are Jackmanii --> Jackmanii is the most popular.

(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis - Correct.

(B) The largest clematis nursery in North America sells nothing but clematis plants - We do not know the contribution of the largest clematis nursery to the overall sales of Jackmanii.

(C) Some of the jackmanii sold by the nursery are sold to gardeners outside North America - Irrelevant

(D) Most North American gardeners grow clematis in their gardens - Irrelevant.

(E) For all nurseries in North America that specialize in clematis, at least 10% of the clematis plants they sell are jackmanii - Even if all nurseries do not contribute at least 10% of the clematis plants, Jackmanii plant can still be the most popular.

Answer: A
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 08:56
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IMO: A

As it's all about number crunching. If 10% of all clematis vine are jackmanii, there must be more than 10 different types of clematis in order for jackmanii to be among famous.
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 09:15
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doomedcat wrote:
I think its would be E
it has to assume all nurseries sell at least 10% jacmanii otherwise it wont be popular



hi

how do you assume so
say, there are 2 types of clematis plants, now if 10% jackmanii are sold, then the rest 90% will account for the 2nd clematis plants
in this case, jaxkmanii cannot be the best seller
so, as you can see, this choice cannot be the assumption

A is the answer, because, if assumed that there are more than 10 different clematis plants, say 20 types, then 2 plants sold are jackmanii, and the rest 18 non-jackmanii will account for the remaining 90%

hope this helps!

cheers and thanks
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 10:10
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 222: Critical Reasoning


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Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine that is most popular among gardeners in North America is jackmanii. This belief is apparently correct since, of the one million clematis plants sold per year by the largest clematis nursery in North America, ten percent are jackmanii.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis
(B) The largest clematis nursery in North America sells nothing but clematis plants
(C) Some of the jackmanii sold by the nursery are sold to gardeners outside North America
(D) Most North American gardeners grow clematis in their gardens
(E) For all nurseries in North America that specialize in clematis, at least 10% of the clematis plants they sell are jackmanii.


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Imo A

The conclusion is that the jackmanii is the most popular vine among gardeners in North America . We are also given that there are 1 million plants are sold and 10 percent of them comprise of jackmanii .

From A we can infer if there are more than 10 varieties of the clematis vine , then if each kind has equal share of 1 million then also jackmanii is the highest with more plants sold than any other variety.
We can also perform negation test on this choice as we can see this destroys the argument , as we can only infer that share of clemetis vine is more than 10 percent and there are fewer than 10 varieties .Suppose there are 5 varieties then one of them may sell more that jackmanii.

B is out of scope
C Again out of scope as they may sell to Gardner outside North America to increase the trade .
D This is a general statement if does not tell us anything about the proportion grown.
E If there are 5 varieties then one of may outsell jackmanii.
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QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 17:57
E is better choice than A as it states that every Gardner who are specialised in clematis grows jackmani rather than single gardener with largest nursery.
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2018, 18:50
E is the answer IMO.if each nursery produces atleast 10 per cent jacimanii, that adds up to the overall count and there is a possibility that jackmanii counts for 10 per cent of overall population.

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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Feb 2018, 19:51
A or B ..i think B is more suitable. what is OA ?

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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2018, 08:23
good question. only (A) holds the necessary premise to reach the conclusion: ten percent are jackmanii.
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2018, 09:59
I got this correct, but I am not understanding why A is completely right. In this example, the stimulus only states one nursery. Isn't it logical to question the wording. I would expect it to state that the plants sold need to be of all distributors? Why is this one nursery indicative of all gardeners?
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2018, 10:06
In option A- The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis. Suppose, the nursey sells 12 varieties. Of the 12 varieties, suppose 10 varieties are sold at 5 % each, jackmanii at 10% and the other one at 40%. So, howcan we say that Jckamnii si the most popular considering that the sales of someone else is greater than 10%.Also, nowhere in the premise it's given that 10% is the highest sale.
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QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2018, 16:21
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sunny91 wrote:
In option A- The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis. Suppose, the nursey sells 12 varieties. Of the 12 varieties, suppose 10 varieties are sold at 5 % each, jackmanii at 10% and the other one at 40%. So, howcan we say that Jckamnii si the most popular considering that the sales of someone else is greater than 10%.Also, nowhere in the premise it's given that 10% is the highest sale.

As explained in the explanation above, we do not need to PROVE that jackmanii is the most popular variety in NA or even that it is the most popular variety at the nursery. But if jackmanii is NOT the most popular variety at the nursery, then the author's argument falls apart.

If the nursery sells fewer than ten varieties, then there is no way that jackmanii is more popular than all of the others. At best, if there are exactly ten varieties, then jackmanii might be tied for #1. And if there are fewer than 10 varieties, then there MUST be other type that accounts for more than 10% of sales.

It is absolutely true that even with more than 10 varieties, jackmanii might not be #1. But in order for jackmanii to be #1, you MUST assume that there are more than 10 varieties. Choice (A) does not prove that the conclusion is true, but the conclusion CANNOT be true unless (A) is assumed. That makes (A) a required assumption.
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QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 26 Mar 2018, 05:17
GMATNinja wrote:
But what about the other 90%? What if another variety of clematis accounts for MORE than 10% of the one million? In that case, jackmanii would not be the most popular variety at the nursery. However, if no other variety accounts for 10% (or more) of the one million, then jackmanii would be in fact be the most popular variety at the nursery.

Would that prove that jackmanii is the most popular variety in NA? Not necessarily. But if jackmanii is #1 at the largest nursery, that's certainly EVIDENCE that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Again, we are trying to conclude that the belief is APPARENTLY correct, not that the believe is DEFINITELY correct. As long as we have evidence that jackmanii is the most popular variety among NA gardeners, we're in good shape.



Quote:
(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis
If the nursery sells 10 varieties or fewer, then there would HAVE to be another variety that accounts for more than 10% of the one million plants sold at the nursery. If that were true, then jackmanii could not be the most popular variety at the nursery. Thus, we would not have evidence that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Without choice (A), the argument falls apart.

Now, does choice (A) PROVE that jackmanii is #1 at the nursery? Not at all... even with 20 varieties, there could be another type that accounts for more than 10% of the million. That, of course, would ruin the argument.

Even if choice (A) is true, the argument may or may not be valid, but that's okay. In other words, choice (A) doesn't PROVE that the author's reasoning is sound. But without choice (A), the author's argument could not be valid. This is a required assumption, so keep (A).



Dear GMATNinja or GMATNinjaTwo,

#1 a big gap btw the premises and conclusion
GMATNinja wrote:
premises:
    The largest clematis nursery in NA sells one million clematis plants per year.
    Of the one million clematis plants sold per year by that nursery, ten percent are jackmanii.

conclusion: he gardener's belief--that jackmanii is the most popular variety of clematis vine among gardeners in North America (NA)--is apparently correct


Anyone think that this argument has a gap that generalizes (NA)from a special nursery (the largest nursery)
even as the premises above, it does not lead to the conclusion, a top sale in the largest nursery does not mean the most popular in NA (North America),
it is highly possible that the others nurseries expect the largest one sells one kind of clematis vines, say X, far more then the largest one sales jackmanii, the top sales.
Then X is much more popular than jackmanii,
see, we can weaken the most popular,
So it seems not so closely that lead to conclusion

One reason i haven't gotten A is correct.


#2what's assumption?
Seems i haven't gotten what assumption.

IMO, assumption is one unstated premise, which the author believes conclusion MUST BE TRUE if based the assumption.

That why i did not understand a part of your explanation :
Even if choice (A) is true, the argument may or may not be valid, but that's okay. In other words, choice (A) doesn't PROVE that the author's reasoning is sound.

if the argument is invalid, does it still be an assumption, seems it does NOT consist with the definition of assumption.

another reason i did not get A is correct.

#3 what's required assumption
Is required assumption a segment of assumption. if is, then required assumption has the character, the conclusion MUST BE TRUE based on required assumption, right?

#4 difference bwt "apparently" and "definitely"
As you mentioned, The conclusion would be substantially different if we were to replace "apparently" with "definitely".
Would you please explain further?
you emphase "PROVE" , a word leading me to consider it a strengthen question, I think i must miss something, would you please help?

Have a nice day
>_~

Originally posted by zoezhuyan on 26 Mar 2018, 00:30.
Last edited by zoezhuyan on 26 Mar 2018, 05:17, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2018, 23:48
zoezhuyan wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
But what about the other 90%? What if another variety of clematis accounts for MORE than 10% of the one million? In that case, jackmanii would not be the most popular variety at the nursery. However, if no other variety accounts for 10% (or more) of the one million, then jackmanii would be in fact be the most popular variety at the nursery.

Would that prove that jackmanii is the most popular variety in NA? Not necessarily. But if jackmanii is #1 at the largest nursery, that's certainly EVIDENCE that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Again, we are trying to conclude that the belief is APPARENTLY correct, not that the believe is DEFINITELY correct. As long as we have evidence that jackmanii is the most popular variety among NA gardeners, we're in good shape.



Quote:
(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis
If the nursery sells 10 varieties or fewer, then there would HAVE to be another variety that accounts for more than 10% of the one million plants sold at the nursery. If that were true, then jackmanii could not be the most popular variety at the nursery. Thus, we would not have evidence that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Without choice (A), the argument falls apart.

Now, does choice (A) PROVE that jackmanii is #1 at the nursery? Not at all... even with 20 varieties, there could be another type that accounts for more than 10% of the million. That, of course, would ruin the argument.

Even if choice (A) is true, the argument may or may not be valid, but that's okay. In other words, choice (A) doesn't PROVE that the author's reasoning is sound. But without choice (A), the author's argument could not be valid. This is a required assumption, so keep (A).



Dear GMATNinja or GMATNinjaTwo,

#1 a big gap btw the premises and conclusion
GMATNinja wrote:
premises:
    The largest clematis nursery in NA sells one million clematis plants per year.
    Of the one million clematis plants sold per year by that nursery, ten percent are jackmanii.

conclusion: he gardener's belief--that jackmanii is the most popular variety of clematis vine among gardeners in North America (NA)--is apparently correct


Anyone think that this argument has a gap that generalizes (NA)from a special nursery (the largest nursery)
even as the premises above, it does not lead to the conclusion, a top sale in the largest nursery does not mean the most popular in NA (North America),
it is highly possible that the others nurseries expect the largest one sells one kind of clematis vines, say X, far more then the largest one sales jackmanii, the top sales.
Then X is much more popular than jackmanii,
see, we can weaken the most popular,
So it seems not so closely that lead to conclusion

One reason i haven't gotten A is correct.


#2what's assumption?
Seems i haven't gotten what assumption.

IMO, assumption is one unstated premise, which the author believes conclusion MUST BE TRUE if based the assumption.

That why i did not understand a part of your explanation :
Even if choice (A) is true, the argument may or may not be valid, but that's okay. In other words, choice (A) doesn't PROVE that the author's reasoning is sound.

if the argument is invalid, does it still be an assumption, seems it does NOT consist with the definition of assumption.

another reason i did not get A is correct.

#3 what's required assumption
Is required assumption a segment of assumption. if is, then required assumption has the character, the conclusion MUST BE TRUE based on required assumption, right?

#4 difference bwt "apparently" and "definitely"
As you mentioned, The conclusion would be substantially different if we were to replace "apparently" with "definitely".
Would you please explain further?
you emphase "PROVE" , a word leading me to consider it a strengthen question, I think i must miss something, would you please help?

Have a nice day
>_~


Anyone help ?

Please ~~~
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2018, 19:55
zoezhuyan wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
But what about the other 90%? What if another variety of clematis accounts for MORE than 10% of the one million? In that case, jackmanii would not be the most popular variety at the nursery. However, if no other variety accounts for 10% (or more) of the one million, then jackmanii would be in fact be the most popular variety at the nursery.

Would that prove that jackmanii is the most popular variety in NA? Not necessarily. But if jackmanii is #1 at the largest nursery, that's certainly EVIDENCE that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Again, we are trying to conclude that the belief is APPARENTLY correct, not that the believe is DEFINITELY correct. As long as we have evidence that jackmanii is the most popular variety among NA gardeners, we're in good shape.



Quote:
(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis
If the nursery sells 10 varieties or fewer, then there would HAVE to be another variety that accounts for more than 10% of the one million plants sold at the nursery. If that were true, then jackmanii could not be the most popular variety at the nursery. Thus, we would not have evidence that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Without choice (A), the argument falls apart.

Now, does choice (A) PROVE that jackmanii is #1 at the nursery? Not at all... even with 20 varieties, there could be another type that accounts for more than 10% of the million. That, of course, would ruin the argument.

Even if choice (A) is true, the argument may or may not be valid, but that's okay. In other words, choice (A) doesn't PROVE that the author's reasoning is sound. But without choice (A), the author's argument could not be valid. This is a required assumption, so keep (A).



Dear GMATNinja or GMATNinjaTwo,

#1 a big gap btw the premises and conclusion
GMATNinja wrote:
premises:
    The largest clematis nursery in NA sells one million clematis plants per year.
    Of the one million clematis plants sold per year by that nursery, ten percent are jackmanii.

conclusion: he gardener's belief--that jackmanii is the most popular variety of clematis vine among gardeners in North America (NA)--is apparently correct


Anyone think that this argument has a gap that generalizes (NA)from a special nursery (the largest nursery)
even as the premises above, it does not lead to the conclusion, a top sale in the largest nursery does not mean the most popular in NA (North America),
it is highly possible that the others nurseries expect the largest one sells one kind of clematis vines, say X, far more then the largest one sales jackmanii, the top sales.
Then X is much more popular than jackmanii,
see, we can weaken the most popular,
So it seems not so closely that lead to conclusion

One reason i haven't gotten A is correct.


#2what's assumption?
Seems i haven't gotten what assumption.

IMO, assumption is one unstated premise, which the author believes conclusion MUST BE TRUE if based the assumption.

That why i did not understand a part of your explanation :
Even if choice (A) is true, the argument may or may not be valid, but that's okay. In other words, choice (A) doesn't PROVE that the author's reasoning is sound.

if the argument is invalid, does it still be an assumption, seems it does NOT consist with the definition of assumption.

another reason i did not get A is correct.

#3 what's required assumption
Is required assumption a segment of assumption. if is, then required assumption has the character, the conclusion MUST BE TRUE based on required assumption, right?

#4 difference bwt "apparently" and "definitely"
As you mentioned, The conclusion would be substantially different if we were to replace "apparently" with "definitely".
Would you please explain further?
you emphase "PROVE" , a word leading me to consider it a strengthen question, I think i must miss something, would you please help?

Have a nice day
>_~

The author is simply arguing that there is evidence suggesting that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Yes, it is possible that, despite this evidence, jackmanii is not #1. We don't care about that possibility. As long as jackmanii is #1 at the nursery, then we have evidence that it is #1 in NA. In other words, in that case, jackmanii is apparently #1 in NA. This absolutely does not prove that jackmanii is #1, but the author is not trying to prove anything.

Consider the following example:

  • Most Americans believe that the Big Mac is the most popular sandwich at McDonalds.
  • This belief is apparently correct. A recent study looked at sales of the 1,000 highest-revenue-generating McDonalds in the US. The number of Big Macs sold at those restaurants was twice as large as the number of any other sandwich sold.

Does that PROVE that Big Macs are #1 in the US? Nope. But the argument is not concerned with proving anything. The argument simply says that the evidence supports the belief of most Americans. So even if Big Macs are NOT #1, the logic of this argument is not flawed. Similarly, the argument in the passage is not invalid at all, regardless of whether clematis is actually #1.

I hope that helps!
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2018, 23:33
GMATNinja wrote:
The author is simply arguing that there is evidence suggesting that jackmanii is #1 in NA. Yes, it is possible that, despite this evidence, jackmanii is not #1. We don't care about that possibility. As long as jackmanii is #1 at the nursery, then we have evidence that it is #1 in NA. In other words, in that case, jackmanii is apparently #1 in NA. This absolutely does not prove that jackmanii is #1, but the author is not trying to prove anything.

Consider the following example:

  • Most Americans believe that the Big Mac is the most popular sandwich at McDonalds.
  • This belief is apparently correct. A recent study looked at sales of the 1,000 highest-revenue-generating McDonalds in the US. The number of Big Macs sold at those restaurants was twice as large as the number of any other sandwich sold.

Does that PROVE that Big Macs are #1 in the US? Nope. But the argument is not concerned with proving anything. The argument simply says that the evidence supports the belief of most Americans. So even if Big Macs are NOT #1, the logic of this argument is not flawed. Similarly, the argument in the passage is not invalid at all, regardless of whether clematis is actually #1.

I hope that helps!


Thanks so much GMATNinja
after your reply, i think assumption does not PROVE the conclusion, in this case, the link is between 10% sales and most popular, whatever other small nurseries' sale, we do NOT need to consider,

Would you please explain the further question #4, listed in earlier post.

#4 difference bwt "apparently" and "definitely"
As you mentioned, The conclusion would be substantially different if we were to replace "apparently" with "definitely".
Would you please explain further?

Have a nice day
>_~
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2018, 01:15
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 222: Critical Reasoning


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Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine that is most popular among gardeners in North America is jackmanii. This belief is apparently correct since, of the one million clematis plants sold per year by the largest clematis nursery in North America, ten percent are jackmanii.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?

(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis
(B) The largest clematis nursery in North America sells nothing but clematis plants
(C) Some of the jackmanii sold by the nursery are sold to gardeners outside North America
(D) Most North American gardeners grow clematis in their gardens
(E) For all nurseries in North America that specialize in clematis, at least 10% of the clematis plants they sell are jackmanii.


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Choice A is an assumption on which the argument has to depend . There may be other assumptions which are required to make the argument true. Other choices are not assumptions the argument has to depend upon.
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Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2018, 07:03
It says because out of one million clematis plants sold per year by the largest clematis nursery in North America, ten percent are jackmanii therefore the variety of clematis vine that is most popular among gardeners in North America is jackmanii

If 10% is the most popular then there has to be atleast 10 or more than 10 varieties of clematis vine. Is this information given in the passage by the author? NO, as it is assumed.

(A) The nursery sells more than 10 different varieties of clematis  - That’s our answer because if we don’’t assume this than the conclusion “the variety of clematis vine that is most popular among gardeners in North America is jackmanii” no longer stands.
(B) The largest clematis nursery in North America sells nothing but clematis plants - It doesn’t matter if they sell tomatoes also, it doesn’t count what else they sell.
(C) Some of the jackmanii sold by the nursery are sold to gardeners outside North America – Great, good for them but we are more concerned about the gardeners in North America.
(D) Most North American gardeners grow clematis in their gardens – sure, but how does it help us to know that jackmanii is the most popular among the gardeners in NA.
(E) For all nurseries in North America that specialize in clematis, at least 10% of the clematis plants they sell are jackmanii. There may be 10,000 nurseries in NA that specialize in clematis and 1000 are jackmanii but it doesn’t have any connection to believe that jackmanii is the most popular among the gardeners in NA.
Re: QOTD: Many gardeners believe that the variety of clematis vine &nbs [#permalink] 29 Mar 2018, 07:03

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