GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 Sep 2018, 11:50

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 21 Jun 2014
Posts: 32
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2015, 13:52
6
14
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

64% (00:59) correct 36% (01:07) wrong based on 748 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in late 2002, officials feared that the outbreak would widespread; they were concerned that the virus would become a global threat and it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.

(A) it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(B) it would kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.
(C) kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(D) kill vast numbers of patients who have no protection against them.
(E) kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against them.


I need help to understand that -
Why the Official Answer is right and why not other?
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4545
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2015, 21:33
2
3
sr

The same query I had in my mind; So I requested for the official OE of Veritas for choice B’s rejection and this is the version

Quote:
The first Decision Point here is whether or not to begin with the word “it” (as in A and B). You should see the Sentence Correction Parallelism in play here. The word “virus” is the subject of that verb “kill” as well as the antecedent for ‘it’. So in order to make that decision you need to include that entire component, which says
(officials) were concerned that that the virus would become --- and it would kill
In order to be parallel while introducing the subject ‘it’, the structure would require ‘that’ to be in there too (“officials were concerned that the virus would become and that it would kill”), but without the word ‘that’ choices A and B cannot stand. From there, you should recognize the pronoun difference between C, D and E. D and E both use ‘them’ --- but the antecedent is again ‘virus’. So the plural pronoun is incorrect leaving C as the correct answer.


It is clear from the OE that B is rejected for not maintaining ‘that’ parallelism and not for using the ‘with’ preposition after the word patients. As such there seems to be no issue about 'patients with no protection against it' by Veritas.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

General Discussion
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 06 Jul 2014
Posts: 1244
Location: Ukraine
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Technology
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V33
GMAT 2: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2015, 14:07
2
1
sandeepmanocha wrote:
#64. When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in late 2002, officials feared that the outbreak would widespread; they were concerned that the virus would become a global threat and it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.

(A) it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(B) it would kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.
(C) kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(D) kill vast numbers of patients who have no protection against them.
(E) kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against them.


I need help to understand that -
Why the Official Answer is right and why not other?


A) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
B) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
C) correct
D) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect
E) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect
_________________

Simple way to always control time during the quant part.
How to solve main idea questions without full understanding of RC.
660 (Q48, V33) - unpleasant surprise
740 (Q50, V40, IR3) - anti-debrief ;)

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 54
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2015, 14:20
1
Harley1980 wrote:
sandeepmanocha wrote:
#64. When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in late 2002, officials feared that the outbreak would widespread; they were concerned that the virus would become a global threat and it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.

(A) it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(B) it would kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.
(C) kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(D) kill vast numbers of patients who have no protection against them.
(E) kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against them.


I need help to understand that -
Why the Official Answer is right and why not other?


A) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
B) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
C) correct
D) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect
E) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect


I have a doubt here, why do you think that 'it' can refer to threat. Can threat kill somebody, only virus can kill someone.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 06 Jul 2014
Posts: 1244
Location: Ukraine
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Technology
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V33
GMAT 2: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2015, 14:43
1
viksingh15 wrote:
Harley1980 wrote:
sandeepmanocha wrote:
#64. When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in late 2002, officials feared that the outbreak would widespread; they were concerned that the virus would become a global threat and it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.

(A) it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(B) it would kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.
(C) kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(D) kill vast numbers of patients who have no protection against them.
(E) kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against them.


I need help to understand that -
Why the Official Answer is right and why not other?


A) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
B) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
C) correct
D) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect
E) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect


I have a doubt here, why do you think that 'it' can refer to threat. Can threat kill somebody, only virus can kill someone.


Nice reprimand I didn't pay attention on this.

I'm not completely sure but I think there is uncertain situation: virus would become (and in this uncertain situation we should use would)
but if this situation became true, the virus will definitely kill vast numbers of patients (and we shouldn't use would to emphasize certainty of this deadly outcome)
_________________

Simple way to always control time during the quant part.
How to solve main idea questions without full understanding of RC.
660 (Q48, V33) - unpleasant surprise
740 (Q50, V40, IR3) - anti-debrief ;)

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Oct 2013
Posts: 54
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2015, 14:51
1
I need help to understand that -
Why the Official Answer is right and why not other?[/quote]

A) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
B) we can't say on which noun refer first and second it on the virus or threat. Incorrect
C) correct
D) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect
E) we can't say on which noun refer them because we don't have any subjects in plural (except patients but this create nonsesical meaning). Incorrect[/quote]

I have a doubt here, why do you think that 'it' can refer to threat. Can threat kill somebody, only virus can kill someone.[/quote]

Nice reprimand I didn't pay attention on this.

I'm not completely sure but I think there is uncertain situation: virus would become (and in this uncertain situation we should use would)
but if this situation became true, the virus will definitely kill vast numbers of patients (and we shouldn't use would to emphasize certainty of this deadly outcome)[/quote]

Just to add more in option "C", we have "it" in the end, that can also refer to virus/threat. As per your explanation. right. ?

Only reason I am inclined towards C is it is not wordier.

we can infer C like this => that the virus would <become a global threat > and <kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it >

I may be wrong :)
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 06 Jul 2014
Posts: 1244
Location: Ukraine
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Technology
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V33
GMAT 2: 740 Q50 V40
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 May 2015, 14:55
2
viksingh15 wrote:
Just to add more in option "C", we have "it" in the end, that can also refer to virus/threat. As per your explanation. right. ?

Only reason I am inclined towards C is it is not wordier.

we can infer C like this => that the virus would <become a global threat > and <kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it >

I may be wrong :)


No, because in variant C we have subject virus which have two verbs: would become and kill
And threat is not subject, so it refer to virus.

IMHO. Maybe I wrong too ;)
_________________

Simple way to always control time during the quant part.
How to solve main idea questions without full understanding of RC.
660 (Q48, V33) - unpleasant surprise
740 (Q50, V40, IR3) - anti-debrief ;)

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 21 Jun 2014
Posts: 32
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2015, 13:29
1
Harley1980 wrote:
viksingh15 wrote:
Just to add more in option "C", we have "it" in the end, that can also refer to virus/threat. As per your explanation. right. ?

Only reason I am inclined towards C is it is not wordier.

we can infer C like this => that the virus would <become a global threat > and <kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it >

I may be wrong :)


No, because in variant C we have subject virus which have two verbs: would become and kill
And threat is not subject, so it refer to virus.

IMHO. Maybe I wrong too ;)



Thanks Harley and VikSingh for adding more clarity on this, and after looking at your comments I can see the statement much better than before. Yet I have some confusion regarding the structure and use of “it”, and the reasoning behind the correct answer (C), but not (B).


(C)
Once Outside
Subject Virus (Branch A implicit subject virus and Branch B implicit subject virus)

the virus would
become a global threat
and
kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it

In this case last “it” must be referring to “virus", implicit subject of clause after “and"

(B)
Twice Inside
Subject Virus (Branch A with “virus" and Branch B with “it” )

the virus would
become a global threat
and
it would kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.

Now if I go by this, they booth seems grammatically correct, to me, but option C is concise and clear.
To the point that “it” after “and” in this option does not have a clear antecedent is confusing for me. Although if I do not think about the parallel structure then it seems obvious that “it” does not have clear antecedent.

Please can you help me to understand, what I need to consider more to look at this strutter to make the the meaning / answer choice crystal clear.

Thanks
Sandeep
Current Student
User avatar
V
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 5023
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2015, 21:29
Current Student
User avatar
V
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 5023
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 May 2015, 21:31
1
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Status: Online
Joined: 07 Feb 2015
Posts: 28
Location: India
Rudey: RD
Concentration: Marketing, General Management
GMAT 1: 620 Q45 V31
GMAT 2: 640 Q46 V31
GPA: 3.29
WE: Sales (Hospitality and Tourism)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2015, 04:50
1
I incorrectly chose D, should have checked them refers to not just Virus's! ;) Good Question
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 21 Jun 2014
Posts: 32
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2015, 19:40
souvik101990 wrote:
Quote:
Although if I do not think about the parallel structure then it seems obvious that “it” does not have clear antecedent.


Pronoun ambiguity is NOT a rule in the GMAT.



Why is (D) incorrect?

Thanks
Sandeep
Current Student
User avatar
V
Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 5023
Location: India
GMAT 1: 760 Q50 V42
GPA: 3.8
WE: Marketing (Non-Profit and Government)
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2015, 20:25
1
sandeepmanocha wrote:
souvik101990 wrote:
Quote:
Although if I do not think about the parallel structure then it seems obvious that “it” does not have clear antecedent.


Pronoun ambiguity is NOT a rule in the GMAT.



Why is (D) incorrect?

Thanks
Sandeep


(D) kill vast numbers of patients who have no protection against them.

'them' does not have an antecedent.
_________________

Have an MBA application Question? ASK ME ANYTHING!

My Stuff: Four Years to 760 | MBA Trends for Indian Applicants

My GMAT Resources
V30-V40: How to do it! | GMATPrep SC | GMATPrep CR | GMATPrep RC | Critical Reasoning Megathread | CR: Numbers and Statistics | CR: Weaken | CR: Strengthen | CR: Assumption | SC: Modifier | SC: Meaning | SC: SV Agreement | RC: Primary Purpose | PS/DS: Numbers and Inequalities | PS/DS: Combinatorics and Coordinates

My MBA Resources
Everything about the MBA Application | Over-Represented MBA woes | Fit Vs Rankings | Low GPA: What you can do | Letter of Recommendation: The Guide | Indian B Schools accepting GMAT score | Why MBA?

My Reviews
Veritas Prep Live Online

Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2015
Posts: 77
Concentration: Strategy, Operations
GMAT 1: 700 Q51 V33
WE: Research (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 May 2015, 03:12
2
sandeepmanocha wrote:
#64. When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in late 2002, officials feared that the outbreak would widespread; they were concerned that the virus would become a global threat and it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.

(A) it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(B) it would kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.
(C) kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(D) kill vast numbers of patients who have no protection against them.
(E) kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against them.


I need help to understand that -
Why the Official Answer is right and why not other?


Hi folks,

Before I shoot my question, pl. read the statement that I picked from WSJ...
Spanish police on Monday said a teenager had allegedly killed a teacher in Barcelona with a crossbow and wounded four others - Here "with a crossbow" answers how did the teenager kill the teacher .... by using a crossbow.... hence, here the prepositional phrase "with a crossbow" modifies the verb killed. (or is there a ambiguity in the meaning and it means that teacher who was having a crossbow was killed by a student?)

Now, on similar lines can someone suggest me what is the diff. between:-
1) kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it. and,
2) kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.

Is there any meaning diff.? does 2nd statement suggests that how virus is going to kill patients? by using no protection....or does the prepositional phrase modifies people suggesting that they don't have any protection against the virus.

Thanks and Regards,

R
_________________

If you like my post, Pl. do not hesitate to press kudos!!!!

Q51 on GMAT - PM me if you need any help with GMAT QUANTS!!!

Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1151
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 19 Sep 2015, 08:49
Quote:
When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in late 2002, officials feared that the outbreak would widespread; they were concerned that the virus would become a global threat and it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.

(A) it would kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(B) it would kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against it.
(C) kill vast numbers of patients who would have no protection against it.
(D) kill vast numbers of patients who have no protection against them.
(E) kill vast numbers of patients with no protection against them.


we can eliminate D and E since they use them to refer virus.
with no protection does not modify patients as additional information without a comma in between them and

Noun modifiers are often introduced by Relative Pronouns such as the following:
Which That Who Whose Whom Where When
Such modifiers are called Relative Pronouns. Relative pronouns are subject to several restrictions.
The pronouns who and whom must modify people.
the pronoun which must modify things
that cannot modify people
whose can modify either people or things,
Thus B is wrong since we use with to modify patients.

I read in solution that for A to be correct that needs to be placed before it. since it is not present A is wrong.
Can someone explain that scenario for me and also explain why C is correct?
_________________

The only time you can lose is when you give up. Try hard and you will suceed.
Thanks = Kudos. Kudos are appreciated

http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-in-verbal-gmat-forum-134642.html
When you post a question Pls. Provide its source & TAG your questions
Avoid posting from unreliable sources.


My posts
http://gmatclub.com/forum/beauty-of-coordinate-geometry-213760.html#p1649924
http://gmatclub.com/forum/calling-all-march-april-gmat-takers-who-want-to-cross-213154.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/possessive-pronouns-200496.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/double-negatives-206717.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-greatest-integer-function-223595.html#p1721773
https://gmatclub.com/forum/improve-reading-habit-233410.html#p1802265


Originally posted by Nevernevergiveup on 19 Sep 2015, 06:36.
Last edited by Nevernevergiveup on 19 Sep 2015, 08:49, edited 2 times in total.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4545
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2015, 08:08
Mechmeera

Quote:
with no protection does not define patients without a common in between them and persons always play antecedent role to relative pronouns (he,she,who,whom,those,them,whose etc).
Thus B is eliminated.

Can you pl explain what you were trying to convey in your version? What is the ‘common’ required in between them? Did you mean a ‘comma’? Do u mean there should be a comma before’with”? Can you kindly clarify? I did not also get what you meant by “persons play antecedent role to relative pronouns. (he,she,who,whom,those,them,whose etc)"

As far as I know, common relative pronouns are ---: that, which, who, whom whose etc---;
And then there are personal pronouns of two kinds as follows.1 Subject pronouns (I, You, He, She, It, They, We); they replace the subject in the sentence.; 2. Object pronouns (Me, You, Him, Her, It, Us, Them); they take the place of the object in the sentence.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4545
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2015, 08:19
1
One reason why the prepositional modifier ‘with no protection against it' gives a feeling that there is a sect of people who exist with protection as compared to people who have no such protection and the SARS will kill that sect of people who have no protection.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1151
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2015, 08:51
daagh wrote:
Mechmeera

Quote:
with no protection does not define patients without a common in between them and persons always play antecedent role to relative pronouns (he,she,who,whom,those,them,whose etc).
Thus B is eliminated.

Can you pl explain what you were trying to convey in your version? What is the ‘common’ required in between them? Did you mean a ‘comma’? Do u mean there should be a comma before’with”? Can you kindly clarify? I did not also get what you meant by “persons play antecedent role to relative pronouns. (he,she,who,whom,those,them,whose etc)"

As far as I know, common relative pronouns are ---: that, which, who, whom whose etc---;
And then there are personal pronouns of two kinds as follows.1 Subject pronouns (I, You, He, She, It, They, We); they replace the subject in the sentence.; 2. Object pronouns (Me, You, Him, Her, It, Us, Them); they take the place of the object in the sentence.


I edited the context.
due to typo error I typed common instead of comma.
I hope u understand the text now since I picked the info I wanted to explain from the source.
I hope this helps?
_________________

The only time you can lose is when you give up. Try hard and you will suceed.
Thanks = Kudos. Kudos are appreciated

http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-in-verbal-gmat-forum-134642.html
When you post a question Pls. Provide its source & TAG your questions
Avoid posting from unreliable sources.


My posts
http://gmatclub.com/forum/beauty-of-coordinate-geometry-213760.html#p1649924
http://gmatclub.com/forum/calling-all-march-april-gmat-takers-who-want-to-cross-213154.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/possessive-pronouns-200496.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/double-negatives-206717.html
http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-greatest-integer-function-223595.html#p1721773
https://gmatclub.com/forum/improve-reading-habit-233410.html#p1802265

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4545
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2015, 09:36
Mechmeera’
I understand the typo error: it is not an issue at all. All I want to know is whether Veritas is saying that B is rejected because it does not have a comma between patients and with; In other words, if choice B were
Quote:
B) it would kill vast numbers of patients, with no protection against it.

then, will B be the correct choice? Can you kindly give the verbatim OE of from the source as far as B is concerned.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 23 Sep 2013
Posts: 140
Concentration: Strategy, Marketing
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Reviews Badge
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Sep 2015, 12:24
1
daagh wrote:
Mechmeera’
I understand the typo error: it is not an issue at all. All I want to know is whether Veritas is saying that B is rejected because it does not have a comma between patients and with; In other words, if choice B were
Quote:
B) it would kill vast numbers of patients, with no protection against it.

then, will B be the correct choice? Can you kindly give the verbatim OE of from the source as far as B is concerned.


Hi daagh

Why is option B incorrect. And what's the issue with this construction "patients with no protection against it" .

Thanks in advance.

Regards
SR
Re: When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in &nbs [#permalink] 19 Sep 2015, 12:24

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 26 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

When the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pandemic occurred in

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.