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An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability

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An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Nov 2018, 03:50
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An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability of automobiles manufactured by the Deluxe Motor Car Company cites as evidence the fact that over half of all automobiles built by the company since 1970 are still on the road today, compared to no more than a third for any other manufacturer.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the advertisement’s argument?


(A) After taking inflation into account, a new Deluxe automobile costs only slightly more than a new model did in 1970.

(B) The number of automobiles built by Deluxe each year has not increased sharply since 1970.

(C) Owners of Deluxe automobiles typically keep their cars well maintained.

(D) Since 1970, Deluxe has made fewer changes in the automobiles it manufactures than other car companies have made in their automobiles.

(E) Deluxe automobiles have been selling at relatively stable prices in recent years.

Originally posted by reply2spg on 23 Feb 2009, 17:53.
Last edited by Bunuel on 08 Nov 2018, 03:50, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2009, 11:06
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reply2spg wrote:
An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability of automobiles manufactured by the Deluxe Motor Car Company cites as evidence the fact that over half of all automobiles built by the company since 1970 are still on the road today, compared to no more than a third for any other manufacturer.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the advertisement’s argument?

(A) After taking inflation into account, a new Deluxe automobile costs only slightly more than a new model did in 1970.
(B) The number of automobiles built by Deluxe each year has not increased sharply since 1970.
(C) Owners of Deluxe automobiles typically keep their cars well maintained.
(D) Since 1970, Deluxe has made fewer changes in the automobiles it manufactures than other car companies have made in their automobiles.
(E) Deluxe automobiles have been selling at relatively stable prices in recent years.


Clearly A,C,E are irrelevant or will weaken the argument

B says The number of automobiles built by Deluxe each year has not increased sharply since 1970.

Consider the opposite

The number of automobiles built by Deluxe each year has increased sharply since 1970. The argument points out that the durability of the cars is based on the longevity of the car. If they made only 1000 cars from 70-2000 and 200K in 2001-2005 and 100K cars are on the market, Is that durability caused by longevity? No.

Hence this is a good choice, even though this is more like a assumption. Assumptions are nothing but unstated premises that will strengthen the conclusion or needed for the conclusion to be valid, because with out the assumption the conclusion will fall apart.

D is saying that few changes have been done by Deluxe. sort of supports the argument. But not entirely because the durability in the argument is based on the longevity and not how many changes. Just because Deluxe chose not to change much over a long time does not mean that lack of changes (not lack of repairs/recalls) for a long time means longevity.
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2009, 13:16
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I am not convinced with the reasoning presented for option B. Rest all can be eliminated easily.

Explanation:
---------------------------
(A) After taking inflation into account, a new Deluxe automobile costs only slightly more than a new model did in 1970. ---> Irrelevant. We have to focus on durability.

(B) The number of automobiles built by Deluxe each year has not increased sharply since 1970. ---> :?:

(C) Owners of Deluxe automobiles typically keep their cars well maintained. ---> What owners do is not important for the conclusion; what manufacturers do is important.

(D) Since 1970, Deluxe has made fewer changes in the automobiles it manufactures than other car companies have made in their automobiles. ---> When I looked at option D, it was a clear no-no for me. There could be other reasons why automobiles by Deluxe motor are still on roads. Only because they are still on road does not mean that they are durable. IMO, any product's life is directly proportional to how you treat it. Anyone can keep a car running for several years by getting it serviced regularly. But then how come Deluxe Motor is still in business? Though their automobiles may not be durable, they might be very fuel efficient. Who knows?

(E) Deluxe automobiles have been selling at relatively stable prices in recent years. ---> Not convincing. A stable price of a product does not guarantee that the product is durable. Moreover, how many years should actually be considered as ‘recent’?
---------------------------

My option choice is B. Though I could easily discard all but B by process of elimination, I'm not convinced about its reasoning.

I know what matters finally is answer but if you have the correct and convincing reasoning, nothing better than that!

Eagerly waiting for some concrete reasoning…


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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2013, 11:21
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I will go for B as well.

An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability of automobiles manufactured by the Deluxe Motor Co cites as evidence the fact that over half of all automobiles built by the company since 1970 are still on the road today, compared to no more than a third for any other manufacturer.

Which of the following strengthens the argument

A. After taking inflation into account, a new deluxe automobile costs only slightly more than a new model did in 1970.
Cost is not mentioned in the argument. We are taking about durability and number of vehicles on road. This one is out of scope.

B. The number of automobiles built by deluxe each year has not increased sharply since 1970
Suppose the company build 1,000 units each year till 2005(70,000 - Total) ,then 10,000 units each year till 2012(total 70,000) and the life of vehicle is only 5 years, then we can say the argument is invalid, as the evidence is deceiving(number of vehicles on road will be half of the vehicles manufactured since 1970). By saying that the number of units have not sharply increased, we can eliminate this possibility. So this is the correct option.

C. Owners of deluxe automobiles typically keep their cars well maintained
So deluxe automobile got lucky. This doesn't undermine the evidence.

D. Since 1970, Deluxe has made few changes in the automobiles it manufactures than other car companies have made in their automobiles.
The argument is about durability. If they are still using same parts and the consumer is accepting, still there argument and evidence holds true.

E. Deluxe automobiles have been selling at relatively stable prices in recent years.
Again, out of scope.
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2014, 10:24
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I believe the passage doesn’t state that half of all automobiles on the road were produced by Deluxe. The passage states that “over half of all automobiles BUILT BY THE COMPANY since 1970 are still on the road today.” Therefore, I believe it is irrelevant how many cars were produced by Deluxe. I went with D only because it sounds better than B.
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2014, 11:48
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mashableforce wrote:
I believe the passage doesn’t state that half of all automobiles on the road were produced by Deluxe. The passage states that “over half of all automobiles BUILT BY THE COMPANY since 1970 are still on the road today.” Therefore, I believe it is irrelevant how many cars were produced by Deluxe. I went with D only because it sounds better than B.


This one is definitely B, although D can be quite tempting. Here is a little trick to show clearly that the answer is D.

The question asks which answer choice strengthens the argument that Deluxe automobiles are more reliable than other cars, due to the fact that a higher percentage of Deluxe cars are still on the road.

The correct answer will make the conclusion MORE believable. Using a trick to properly identify assumptions, let's negate the answer choice (make the statement the opposite) to see if the conclusion becomes LESS believable.

B - The number of automobiles built by deluxe each year HAS not increased sharply since 1970.
If the number of autos has increased sharply in recent years it would be very easy for a higher percentage to still be on the road so the conclusion that Deluxe autos are more reliable is much, much LESS believable. B is the correct answer. [also see good explanation from ConnectTheDots above]

D - Since 1970, Deluxe has made fewer MORE changes in the automobiles it manufactures than other car companies have made in their automobiles.
This is interesting information, but it doesn't make the conclusion less believable. Cars were chunks of iron with wheels in the 70's and have experienced massive amounts of change over the years. In fact, we might expect more change from reliable car manufacturers. The amount of change does not cast doubt on reliability so D is not the correct answer.

Additionally, watch out for time when CR questions discuss both percentages and raw numbers. The GMAT loves to trap people in the shift between percentages and numbers.

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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 08:18
I am highly confused between B and D.
B- Production hasn't increased is a clear indication that the old cars are still on the roads.
D- Has not made many changes means that it has less chances of improving something and hence more durable.
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 08:34
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Deeksharathore wrote:
I am highly confused between B and D.
B- Production hasn't increased is a clear indication that the old cars are still on the roads.
D- Has not made many changes means that it has less chances of improving something and hence more durable.


D - It mentions DC makes fewer changes than it's competitors. These changes could all be related to durability, or maybe these changes aren't related to durability at all. If it's the first option, then DC cars were not durable, but if it's the latter, then they are reliable. This premise leaves us hanging, so B is the better option.

You can also try to negate B, and say that Deluxe did make more cars than they did in the 70s.
Well, if they are manufacturing more cars than before, more Deluxe cars will be on the road, and it severely impacts the conclusion that Deluxe Cars are more reliable.

Hope this helps.
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2018, 06:57
I am not convinced with any explanation give in this post. I have selected D over B. here is my reasoning.

B- What if population increased exponentially.I mean 25 yrs is a lot of time. this will suggest that demand will increase but they are not participating with this increase.

D - so same thing is working even now. they have not changed why? may be they don't need it. huge assumption. but anyways better choice then B
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2018, 11:19
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Quote:
An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability of automobiles manufactured by the Deluxe Motor Car Company cites as evidence the fact that over half of all automobiles built by the company since 1970 are still on the road today, compared to no more than a third for any other manufacturer.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the advertisement’s argument?

(A) After taking inflation into account, a new Deluxe automobile costs only slightly more than a new model did in 1970.
(B) The number of automobiles built by Deluxe each year has not increased sharply since 1970.
(C) Owners of Deluxe automobiles typically keep their cars well maintained.
(D) Since 1970, Deluxe has made fewer changes in the automobiles it manufactures than other car companies have made in their automobiles.
(E) Deluxe automobiles have been selling at relatively stable prices in recent years.

aragonn wrote:
I am not convinced with any explanation give in this post. I have selected D over B. here is my reasoning.

B- What if population increased exponentially.I mean 25 yrs is a lot of time. this will suggest that demand will increase but they are not participating with this increase.

D - so same thing is working even now. they have not changed why? may be they don't need it. huge assumption. but anyways better choice then B

All we care about is durability. To what extent Deluxe is meeting demand is irrelevant.

Deluxe has produced some number of cars since 1970, and over half of those cars are still on the road. Manufacturer B has produced some number of cars since 1970, but only a third are still on the road.

For now, let's assume that the number of cars produced each year by each company has not significantly changed since 1970 (i.e. Deluxe produced X cars per year and Manufacturer B produced Y cars per year). The values of X and Y are irrelevant. Maybe Manufacturer B produced 10 times as many cars per year as Deluxe. Or maybe Deluxe produced more per year. Regardless, why are over a half of Deluxe's cars still on the road while only a third of B's cars are on the road? This data seems to suggest that Deluxe cars are more durable. The key in this example is that the AVERAGE AGE of cars produced by each company is approximately the same.

However, what if Deluxe dramatically increased production in the year 2008 while Manufacturer B kept production constant each year? In that case, the AVERAGE AGE of Deluxe's post-1970 cars would be much lower than the average age of B's post-1970 cars. In that case, it would not be fair to compare the proportion of cars still on the road from each company. We would expect a higher proportion of Deluxe's cars to be on the road because, on average, their cars are not as old.

Choice (B) tells us that this is NOT the case. Thus, (B) eliminates a scenario that would weaken the argument. Does (B) PROVE that Deluxe cars are more durable? Of course not--we could still think of scenarios that would contradict the author's logic. But that's not important. All we need to do is strengthen the author's argument. By addressing a possible counter-argument, (B) definitely strengthens the argument.
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Re: An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2018, 16:41
Thank you Charles Sir.Your explanations always help me.

The key in this example is that the AVERAGE AGE of cars produced by each company is approximately the same. While I was solving this problem, I thought about not to count newer cars. after all its a durability test, why to look for a shorter running car. Anyways now i can see flaws in my reasoning. Thanks again sir.
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An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2019, 03:46
Hi Expert.

I'm quite confused with the question.

In the passage, I understand that the author focus on only all cars that was built since 1970.

let's say the deluxe company built 1,000 cars in 1970 , over half (let's say 500 cars) of which are still on road.
Is that correct ?

If this is the case , how can the new car built each year relate to the argument?

Expert please explain.

Thank you.
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An advertisement designed to convince readers of the great durability   [#permalink] 16 Feb 2019, 03:46
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