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At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese.

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At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese.  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2017, 19:22
3
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A
B
C
D
E

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61% (00:55) correct 39% (00:52) wrong based on 375 sessions

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At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese. This is true even though over 1,200 students participate in extracurricular athletics or dance, activities offered by the school to promote physical fitness. Clearly, the school’s athletics and dance programs are not rigorous enough.

The above reasoning is flawed because it:

A. Fails to assess the rigor of each activity individually.
B. Does not compare Churchill High School’s programs with programs at other schools.
C. Overlooks the fact that there may be minimal overlap between the two populations cited.
D. Does not consider other factors, such as diet and genetics, that could lead to obesity in high school students.
E. Fails to adequately outline the criteria that would lead to a student being considered obese.​
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Re: At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese.  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2017, 00:21
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gauravraos wrote:
At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese. This is true even though over 1,200 students participate in extracurricular athletics or dance, activities offered by the school to promote physical fitness. Clearly, the school’s athletics and dance programs are not rigorous enough.

The above reasoning is flawed because it:

A. Fails to assess the rigor of each activity individually.
B. Does not compare Churchill High School’s programs with programs at other schools.
C. Overlooks the fact that there may be minimal overlap between the two populations cited.
D. Does not consider other factors, such as diet and genetics, that could lead to obesity in high school students.
E. Fails to adequately outline the criteria that would lead to a student being considered obese.​


1500 Students - Obese
1200 Students - Participate in extracurricular activities
Conclusion - Activities not rigorous enough.

A - 2 Activities are rigorous, and 5 are not, for example. The author will still consider each activity as lax. And breaking down each activity, and still concluding they are not rigorous enough doesn't help us with the conclusion.
B - Irrelevant. OUT.
C - Yes! There aren't only 1500 students at the school of whom 1200 students attend activities. No information in the school supports this information, so the 2 groups might be completely different. KEEP.
D - We are only concerned with school activities, and how it's connected with obesity. OUT.
E - Irrelevant. OUT

Between A & C
C wins as it clearly states a flaw in the argument i.e. if the 2 groups are completely different, then the rigour of an activity cannot be questioned.

C is the answer.
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Re: At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese.  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2017, 14:09
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stuck with C and D.
D is a good pattern in gmat, but D is out of scope in this question. Also, D is a weakener, not an assumption.
C is also an important pattern about the statistic, percentage and numbers. => C directly links with the argument.
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Re: At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese.  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2018, 13:54
Can anyone please help explain why option D is incorrect?
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Re: At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese.  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2018, 17:05
kingyoungin211 wrote:
Can anyone please help explain why option D is incorrect?


In my approach I saw this as irrelevant for the argument. As it's all about the physical activities:

"Clearly, the school’s athletics and dance programs are not rigorous enough.

The above reasoning is flawed because it"

You can have N reasons why they're still obese, but they're discussing the activities only. And C is completelly logical as you can have like 2600 students in the school, so 1500 of them are nearly obese and 1200 practice physical activities.
It's possible that, for example, just 100 of the nearly obese practice the activities. It's a minimal overlap. So this seems the biggest flaw in the argument for me.
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Re: At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese.  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2018, 03:41
gauravraos wrote:
At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese. This is true even though over 1,200 students participate in extracurricular athletics or dance, activities offered by the school to promote physical fitness. Clearly, the school’s athletics and dance programs are not rigorous enough.

The above reasoning is flawed because it:

A. Fails to assess the rigor of each activity individually.
B. Does not compare Churchill High School’s programs with programs at other schools.
C. Overlooks the fact that there may be minimal overlap between the two populations cited.
D. Does not consider other factors, such as diet and genetics, that could lead to obesity in high school students.
E. Fails to adequately outline the criteria that would lead to a student being considered obese.​


VERITAS PREP OFFICIAL SOLUTION:



This problem uses numbers that are fairly similar to each other (1200 and 1500) to make it appear that the populations are similar. But what if there are 4000 people at the school, and none of the students considered obese are among the 1200 who participate in these activities? The fatal flaw in this argument is that the two groups do not necessarily overlap at all, as answer choice C points out.

Among the other answer choices, none attack the direct premise-conclusion structure of the argument. The argument essentially says:

1500 students are obese even though 1200 students (note: not necessarily the same students!) participate in programs specifically offered to help prevent obesity. Therefore, the program is not working.

To compare the program with another school (B) or try to better define obesity (E), for example, does not deal with the given evidence and conclusion as they stand. In a method of reasoning "explain the flaw" problem like this, your job is to describe the argument as it's given, staying within the parameters of what is already there.
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Re: At Churchill High School, nearly 1,500 students are considered obese. &nbs [#permalink] 25 May 2018, 03:41
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