GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 May 2019, 18:21

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 16 Jul 2016
Posts: 7
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Sep 2016, 02:49
In option D, don't we require a helping work (are) with the option.?? One more thing can verb-ing modifiers be used with past tense?..
eg: In 1850, Shershah built the Grand Trunk Road, extending from A to B.
In 1850, Shershah built the Grand Trunk Road, which extended from A to B.

Which between the above 2 sentences is correct?
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 2873
Location: Germany
Schools: German MBA
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Sep 2016, 08:46
2
1
meetmba91 wrote:
In option D, don't we require a helping work (are) with the option.?? One more thing can verb-ing modifiers be used with past tense?..
eg: In 1850, Shershah built the Grand Trunk Road, extending from A to B.
In 1850, Shershah built the Grand Trunk Road, which extended from A to B.

Which between the above 2 sentences is correct?


Your query 1:
No, "are" is not required - "among them..." falls in a special category of modifier called subgroup modifier. Another example ( from Manhattan SC guide):

This model explains all known subatomic particles, SOME OF THEM only recently discovered.

Your query 2:
The present participle modifier takes up the tense of the main verb of the sentence.
I saw a bird flying. ... since the action seeing happened in the past, the action flying also happened in the past.

Your query 3:
You need to understand the difference between:
a. I saw a bird flying... means I saw a bird - it was flying
b. I saw a bird, flying.. means I saw a bird while I was flying.
A comma + a present participle modifier refers to the subject of the previous clause or the the whole clause.

In 1850, Shershah built the Grand Trunk Road, extending from A to B.... wrong: "extending" refers to the subject of the previous clause Shershah. Shershah built the Grand Trunk road - when he built it he could not have extended it at the same time.

In 1850, Shershah built the Grand Trunk Road, which extended from A to B. Here "which..." correctly refers to "Road".
Director
Director
User avatar
G
Affiliations: CrackVerbal
Joined: 03 Oct 2013
Posts: 564
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jan 2017, 01:26
1
Top Contributor
Please change the OA to D.

Let us look at each of the answer options -

A - Incorrect.
"including among them the threat from a rival’s multi-billion-dollar patent infringement suit and the declining sales for the company’s powerful microprocessor chip."

"including + among" is redundnant.
"threat from" is generally used with people. Hence, unidiomatic.
"the threat" and "the declining" are not perfectly parallel.
"sales for" here is incorrect. It seems to imply "sales for the sake of the company's microprocessor chip".

B - Incorrect.
"the numerous challenges facing the company, which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of"

"which" seems to refer to "the company"
"the threat" and "declining" are not perfectly parallel.

C - Incorrect.
"included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for"

"included + among" is redundant as removing "included" does not change the meaning of the sentence.
"these" is incorrect as demonstrative pronouns must have a noun to modify. They cannot be used independently.
"threat from" is generally used with people. Hence, unidiomatic.
"sales for" here is incorrect.

D - correct answer.
"among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of"

"threat of X" - here X is the threat. Hence, correct.
"sales of" - is the correct idiom.

E - incorrect.
"among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for"
Usage of "these" is incorrect.
"sales for" is unidiomatic.
_________________
- CrackVerbal Prep Team

For more info on GMAT and MBA, follow us on @AskCrackVerbal

Register for the Free GMAT Kickstarter Course : http://bit.ly/2DDHKHq

Register for our Personal Tutoring Course : https://www.crackverbal.com/gmat/personal-tutoring/

Join the free 4 part GMAT video training series : http://bit.ly/2DGm8tR
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 2873
Location: Germany
Schools: German MBA
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Feb 2017, 04:01
3
VKat wrote:
Can we use "among them" to connect independent clause .. is it some kind of modifier?


First, "among them" is NOT connecting an independent clause - there is NO clause after " among them", just two things: X (the threat) and Y (the decline) - without any verb.

"Among them X and Y" is a (special) noun modifier referring to "challenges".

One way to remember this construction is to identify the similarity of its structure with a subgroup modifier's (though they are not structurally identical, this connection may help in remembering the construction):

I have many games in my stock, many of them absolutely rubbish. ( If the latter part were an IC, the construction would be: Many of them ARE absolutely rubbish).

They heard of numerous challenges facing the company, among them X and Y. ( If the latter part were an IC, the construction would be: Among them ARE X and Y).

Now one step further:
If you can think a bit deeper, you would realise that this modifier is in fact a subgroup modifier:

many of them ( a subgroup of games) == X and Y ( a subgroup of challenges)
absolutely rubbish ( referring to "many of them") == among them (referring to " X and Y").

The only difference is that the subgroup and the part referring to it are flipped in the latter case.
Senior CR Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Long way to go!
Joined: 10 Oct 2016
Posts: 1353
Location: Viet Nam
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2017, 08:41
1
Chemerical71 wrote:
At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on the numerous challenges facing the company, including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for the company’s powerful microprocessor chip.

A. including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for
B. which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of
C. included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for
D. among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of
E. among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for


A. including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for
"sale for" is wrong grammatically

B. which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of
"which" here wrongly refers to the company

C. included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for
"these" is ambiguous

D. among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of
Correct

E. among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for
"these" is ambiguous
_________________
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 22 Aug 2016
Posts: 81
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Finance
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V29
GMAT 2: 710 Q49 V37
GPA: 3.5
WE: Other (Education)
Reviews Badge
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Aug 2017, 10:51
. including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent infringement suit and the declining sales of


included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent infringement suit as well as a decline in sales of

Suppose these 2 options were available. Which one would be apt usage here?
Please provide some thoughts.
sayantanc2k daagh
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4763
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Aug 2017, 11:34
1
Top Contributor
sarath
1. 'These' cannot stand as a stand-alone demonstrative pronoun in formal writing. Hence, example 2 is out.
One has to be clear about the status of the word 'included"; if it is a verb, we must make sure who included it. There is no answer for that. Alternately and absurdly, it may mean that the investors heard a presentation and included these challenges.
If 'included' was a past participle modifier, then because of the subject pronoun 'these'. We must follow it with a verb such as 'included' among these was x… as well as Y.
On the contrary, we know for certain that 'including' is a present participle and that 'them' is an object pronoun. As such we do not need a verb for the verb+ing modifier.
_________________
The Take-Away: Grammar First and Then the Rest
Senior SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 14 Nov 2016
Posts: 1334
Location: Malaysia
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Aug 2017, 06:23
Quote:
At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on the numerous challenges facing the company, including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for the company’s powerful microprocessor chip.

(A) including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for

(B) which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of

(C) included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for

(D) among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of

(E) among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for


GMATNinja, Could you help to explain "among them" since there are only two things listed in the question?

Quote:
Excerpt from Manhattan Prep Sentence Correction

The other distinction to remember is that you should use between only with two things or people.
When you are talking about three or more things or people, use among.

Wrong: I mediated a dispute BETWEEN Maya, Logan, and Kalen.
Right: I mediated a dispute AMONG Maya, Logan, and Kalen.

_________________
"Be challenged at EVERY MOMENT."

“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

"Each stage of the journey is crucial to attaining new heights of knowledge."

Rules for posting in verbal forum | Please DO NOT post short answer in your post!

Advanced Search : https://gmatclub.com/forum/advanced-search/
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 1451
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Aug 2017, 18:19
hazelnut, we aren't using "among" to relate those two items. We are saying that those two items exist "among" the full range of challenges. The sentence is basically saying "There are many challenges, and among those challenges we find these two."
_________________

Dmitry Farber | Manhattan Prep GMAT Instructor | San Diego


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
P
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2852
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Aug 2017, 04:28
1
hazelnut wrote:

GMATNinja, Could you help to explain "among them" since there are only two things listed in the question?



Hello hazelnut,

I will be glad to help you out with this one. :-)

The structure among them the threat of a rival’s multi billion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of... is a Noun Modifier that modifies the preceding noun the numerous challenges facing the company.

The term among them has been used to refer to the numerous challenges. The correct answer choice says that there are many problems. Among those many problems the two points mentioned in the sentence are most prominent.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 08 Oct 2018
Posts: 13
Location: India
GRE 1: Q159 V149
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Nov 2018, 18:18
daagh wrote:
There is a short cut to cross this long passage. ‘Sales for’ is bad idiom, and so skip 1, 3 and 5. ‘Sales of’ is good idiom. Between 2 and 4, choice 2 no doubt sticks to the relative pronoun touch rule – ‘which’ touches and means ‘company’ - but sadly flouts logical predication by not referring to ‘challenges’ and hence dump it. Merrily tread along 4.



I have a doubt.
'threat of' vs 'threat from' does not make any sense in POE? Is it?
Is it valid to mean- threat of a person, rather than threat from a person?
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 1451
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Nov 2018, 23:01
Both "threat from" and "threat of" can be used. They differ a bit in meaning. With "threat from," the following noun will be what's providing the threat. With "threat of," the following noun is the threat itself. Sometimes those two meanings can overlap.
_________________

Dmitry Farber | Manhattan Prep GMAT Instructor | San Diego


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile |
Manhattan GMAT Reviews
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Apr 2016
Posts: 30
CAT Tests
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Dec 2018, 16:26
I'm having a hard time understanding how ", among them the threat...and...the decline" is an absolute phrase. My understanding is that an absolute phrase has to have the form [noun] + [noun modifier]. In this situation I'm guessing "among them" is the noun and "the threat ...and ... the decline" are the noun modifiers? Is this correct?

In addition, what type of modifier are phrases that begin with ", including"
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Feb 2019
Posts: 12
CAT Tests
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2019, 07:57
Hi, can you please explain why 'these' needs a noun following it? I understand the other errors in the sentence, but I still want to understand this part. I thought that 'these' can replace the noun - challenges? I have seen sentences with these/those, where no noun follows them.

egmat wrote:
kinjiGC wrote:
AbhiJ wrote:
At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on the numerous challenges facing the company, including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent infringement suit and the declining sales for the company’s powerful microprocessor chip.
A. including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for
B. which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of
C. included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for
D. among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of
E. among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for

Can some one explain what type of modifier is used in the correct option and some other usages of this type modifier.


Meaning : At the annual SHM investors heard numerous challenges. Among those challenges were two challenges : threat from a rival's MDPI and decline in sales of company's powerful microprocessor chip.

verbing modifier should modify the preceding clause and should make sense with the subject of the preceding clause. Here including modifies the challenges and doesn't fit well with "investors" subject of the preceding clause.
A. including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for
Rejecting the option A for the above reason and also sales of instead of "for".

B. which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of
which should replace challenges and includes has SV issue

C. included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for
included should modify the closest noun "challenges" that is correct. "included among these" construction doesn't seem correct. sales of should be used instead of "for".

D. among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of
This looks the least of the devil.

E. among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for
"sales for" is the issue.

Doubts:
1) Any issue in "among them" and "among these"?
2) them should refer to the animate pronouns. Isn't it?
3) Any other errors?



Hi kinjiGC,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

It is true that "comma + verb-ing modifier" modifies the preceding action and must make sense with the doer of the modified action. However, "including" is an exception to this rule. Preceded or not preceded by a comma, "including" ALWAYS modifies a noun entity. In this sentence, "including" modifies "the numerous challenges" because what follows "including" are some of the challenges that the company faced.

Hence, Choice A is not incorrect from "comma + including". It is incorrect, as you have already mentioned, for the use of preposition "for" after "the declining sales" and use of preposition "from" after "threat". The correct preposition in the context of this sentence will be "threat of".

Choice B - Again, there is no problem with the modification of "which" here because "facing the company" is a noun modifier that modifies "the numerous challenges" and cannot be placed anywhere. So "which" can jump over this modifier and correctly modify "challenges". But yes, singular Verb "includes" does not agrre in number with plural Subject "challenges".

Choice C: Again, "included" in this choice is not incorrect for the same reason already explained in Choice B. "these" is demonstrative pronoun and must be followed by a noun. Per the context of the sentence, "these" should be followed by "challenges". But it is not. Hence, use of "these" is incorrect. This choice also repeats both teh incorrect prepositions of Choice A.

Choice D: This choice is correct. Here, "among them...." is a Noun Modifier that correctly modifies "the numerous challenges". Note that "them" can be used to refer to animate as well as inanimate objects.

Choice E: This Choice repeats the "these" error of Choice C and the preposition errors of Choice A.

All your doubts have been addressed in the analysis here. Please study them well, compare it to your analysis, and understand what all you possibly missed in your analysis.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
SJ
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2019
Posts: 7
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2019, 08:15
True great news! Recently I also learned that Timur Aartemev https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingn ... 01639.html also announced about leaving BGRF

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 May 2018
Posts: 3
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Apr 2019, 10:31
egmat wrote:
kinjiGC wrote:
AbhiJ wrote:
At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on the numerous challenges facing the company, including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent infringement suit and the declining sales for the company’s powerful microprocessor chip.
A. including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for
B. which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of
C. included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for
D. among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of
E. among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for

Can some one explain what type of modifier is used in the correct option and some other usages of this type modifier.


Meaning : At the annual SHM investors heard numerous challenges. Among those challenges were two challenges : threat from a rival's MDPI and decline in sales of company's powerful microprocessor chip.

verbing modifier should modify the preceding clause and should make sense with the subject of the preceding clause. Here including modifies the challenges and doesn't fit well with "investors" subject of the preceding clause.
A. including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for
Rejecting the option A for the above reason and also sales of instead of "for".

B. which includes the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of
which should replace challenges and includes has SV issue

C. included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for
included should modify the closest noun "challenges" that is correct. "included among these" construction doesn't seem correct. sales of should be used instead of "for".

D. among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of
This looks the least of the devil.

E. among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for
"sales for" is the issue.

Doubts:
1) Any issue in "among them" and "among these"?
2) them should refer to the animate pronouns. Isn't it?
3) Any other errors?



Hi kinjiGC,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

It is true that "comma + verb-ing modifier" modifies the preceding action and must make sense with the doer of the modified action. However, "including" is an exception to this rule. Preceded or not preceded by a comma, "including" ALWAYS modifies a noun entity. In this sentence, "including" modifies "the numerous challenges" because what follows "including" are some of the challenges that the company faced.

Hence, Choice A is not incorrect from "comma + including". It is incorrect, as you have already mentioned, for the use of preposition "for" after "the declining sales" and use of preposition "from" after "threat". The correct preposition in the context of this sentence will be "threat of".

Choice B - Again, there is no problem with the modification of "which" here because "facing the company" is a noun modifier that modifies "the numerous challenges" and cannot be placed anywhere. So "which" can jump over this modifier and correctly modify "challenges". But yes, singular Verb "includes" does not agrre in number with plural Subject "challenges".

Choice C: Again, "included" in this choice is not incorrect for the same reason already explained in Choice B. "these" is demonstrative pronoun and must be followed by a noun. Per the context of the sentence, "these" should be followed by "challenges". But it is not. Hence, use of "these" is incorrect. This choice also repeats both teh incorrect prepositions of Choice A.

Choice D: This choice is correct. Here, "among them...." is a Noun Modifier that correctly modifies "the numerous challenges". Note that "them" can be used to refer to animate as well as inanimate objects.

Choice E: This Choice repeats the "these" error of Choice C and the preposition errors of Choice A.

All your doubts have been addressed in the analysis here. Please study them well, compare it to your analysis, and understand what all you possibly missed in your analysis.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
SJ


In the original sentence is it correct to say -"presentation on the numerous challenges facing the company"?Facing is modifying challenges.It seems like challenges are facing the company.But actually the company is facing the challanges. So,won't it be more apt to say that challenges faced by the company?
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 2611
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Apr 2019, 18:53
PrityPreet wrote:
In the original sentence is it correct to say -"presentation on the numerous challenges facing the company"?Facing is modifying challenges.It seems like challenges are facing the company.But actually the company is facing the challanges. So,won't it be more apt to say that challenges faced by the company?
The verb face has multiple meanings. The two that we are interested in are:

1. "To confront and have to deal with": She faced her fears.
2. "To show itself and have to be dealt with": The challenges facing the company...

You can find a more precise definition here (B2 under "face verb (DEAL WITH)").
_________________
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 14 Feb 2017
Posts: 271
Location: Australia
Concentration: Technology, Strategy
GMAT 1: 560 Q41 V26
GMAT 2: 550 Q43 V23
GPA: 2.61
WE: Management Consulting (Consulting)
CAT Tests
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2019, 16:36
At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on the numerous challenges facing the company, including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for the company’s powerful microprocessor chip.


(A) including among them the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the declining sales for

(B) which includes (should be plural) the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and declining sales of

(C) included among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as a decline in sales for

(D) among them the threat of a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit and the decline in sales of

(E) among these the threat from a rival’s multibillion-dollar patent-infringement suit as well as the decline in sales for

Threat from
To a lesser extent, "threat of" made much more sense to me than "threat from" because it is the threat of the suit. If the suit is already live / in action, and this was clearer, then it would make more sense to use "threat from".

Other issues highlighted in analysis above.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on   [#permalink] 26 Apr 2019, 16:36

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 38 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

At the annual stockholders meeting, investors heard a presentation on

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.