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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care

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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 00:51
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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high.

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them.

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive.

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies.

Source: LSAT
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 04:13
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broall wrote:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high.

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them.

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive.

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies.

Source: LSAT


Answer is C

The conclusion here is the first sentence: there isn't a way to reduce healthcare costs in the current system. Why? Because everybody just shifts costs onto each other.

We're then given an example of 1980s reforms, specifically government health-care insurance cuts.

(C) captures this strategy by noting that the analogy to the '80s reforms is meant to illustrate parties shifting costs to each other. "Example" is like "analogy" because it's a comparison to another instance that illustrates the same phenomenon.

(A) misconstrues the argument. The argument isn't about health-care reimbursement or specifically shifting the cost to the patient; it's about shifting costs all around.

(B) is incorrect. This isn't about fraudulent intent.

(D) is incorrect because although the conclusion is to deny the possibility of a solution, the author doesn't disparage all the possible alternates. He makes one argument and backs it up with any example.

(E) is incorrect because it's the opposite of what we're looking for. Cooperation is not feasible; that's the point.

I hope this clarifies for you!
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Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 07:28
broall wrote:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high.

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them.

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive.

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies.

Source: LSAT


Will go with A by POE
Although i am not 100% convinced with A , but rest other options seem just out of scope to me

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 14:12
broall wrote:
Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care costs cannot be found within the current piecemeal system of paying these costs. The reason is that this system gives health-care providers and insurers every incentive to shift, wherever possible, the costs of treating illness onto each other or any other party, including the patient. That clearly is the lesson of the various reforms of the 1980s: push in on one part of this pliable spending balloon and an equally expensive bulge pops up elsewhere. For example, when the government health-care insurance program for the poor cut costs by disallowing payments for some visits to physicians, patients with advanced illness later presented themselves at hospital emergency rooms in increased numbers.

The argument provides the most support for which one of the following?

(A) Under the conditions in which the current system operates, the overall volume of health-care costs could be shrunk, if at all, only by a comprehensive approach.

(B) Relative to the resources available for health-care funding, the income of the higher-paid health-care professionals is too high.

(C) Health-care costs are expanding to meet additional funds that have been made available for them.

(D) Advances in medical technology have raised the expected standards of medical care but have proved expensive.

(E) Since unfilled hospital beds contribute to overhead charges on each patient’s bill, it would be unwise to hold unused hospital capacity in reserve for large-scale emergencies.

Source: LSAT


hi broall

So far apprehended, current condition that is not optimal has made A the current choice
can you please, nonetheless, post the OE ...?

thanks in advance

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2017, 19:32
IMO. Option C is correct. Please post OE

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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2017, 04:17
Here is some form of explanation I found on MGMAT:

A) doesn't seem likely. "Only by a comprehensive approach" is not discussed. But, it does seem like it might be related to what is in the argument, which is a somewhat non-comprehensive approach. Let's keep it for now.

(B) is not provable. This has nothing to do with the text.

(C) is not provable. This goes well beyond the text.

(D) is not provable. This also goes well beyond the text.

(E) is not provable. This is much more specific to be provable based on this text.

Le'ts go back to (A), our only viable answer. Could (A) be provable?

What we're told is that a system of payment by separate groups cannot work. Therefore, we know that either:

If a system can work, it's going to be not by separate groups, aka "comprehensive."

or

No system can work at all.

So, the system can only work, if it can work at all, using a comprehensive approach.

(A) is the most provable based on the text, and therefore correct.
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Re: Coherent solutions for the problem of reducing health-care   [#permalink] 25 Oct 2017, 04:17
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