GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 10 Dec 2018, 16:15

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free lesson on number properties

     December 10, 2018

     December 10, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 11, 2018

     December 11, 2018

     09:00 PM EST

     10:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics. December 11 at 9 PM EST.

Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Sep 2015
Posts: 109
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 700 Q48 V37
GPA: 3.26
Reviews Badge
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Dec 2015, 21:21
mikemcgarry wrote:
Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named after him, to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift, and made a discovery that led to an early method of measuring blood pressure.
(A) equation named after him, to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift
(B) equation named after him, and this principle explains the lift of an airplane’s wing
(C) equation, named it after himself, explained how an airplane’s wing is generating lift
(D) equation named for him, giving an explanation of the generation of the lift of an airplane’s wing
(E) equation named for him, which explains how an airplane’s wing generates lift


Folks sometimes think of GMAT SC in terms of grammar only, but the SC is as much about logic as it is about grammar. The splits in this question are less about grammatical errors and more about logical problems. For a discussion of logic in GMAT SC questions, more practice questions of this sort, and the OE of this particular question, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/logical-sp ... orrection/

Mike :-)


mikemcgarry

Isn't there a rule that says - 'which' should modify the word placed immediately before itself?? I eliminated E for this reason.
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Dec 2015, 13:28
rachitshah wrote:
mikemcgarry
Isn't there a rule that says - 'which' should modify the word placed immediately before itself?? I eliminated E for this reason.

Dear rachitshah,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, you are thinking of the Modifier Touch Rule, which is an important pattern in grammar and in GMAT SC, but it's not an inviolate rule. It has important exceptions, the most significant of which involves the distinction of vital vs. non-vital modifiers (a.k.a restrictive vs. non-restrictive modifiers). Please see these two posts:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/that-vs-which-on-the-gmat/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... modifiers/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 08 Jun 2015
Posts: 436
Location: India
GMAT 1: 640 Q48 V29
GMAT 2: 700 Q48 V38
GPA: 3.33
Premium Member
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jan 2017, 06:32
mikemcgarry , thanks for the question and the OE :). I have understood why e is the OA. I have a doubt about option D though. Is it correct to eliminate d on the grounds that usage of comma + giving is incorrect here ? This option conveys the meaning that giving is an outcome of the previous clause i.e. naming of the equation after him. This meaning is incorrect.

Kindly comment if my reasoning is correct ?

Thanks in advance :)
_________________

" The few , the fearless "

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jan 2017, 11:22
spetznaz wrote:
mikemcgarry , thanks for the question and the OE :). I have understood why e is the OA. I have a doubt about option D though. Is it correct to eliminate d on the grounds that usage of comma + giving is incorrect here ? This option conveys the meaning that giving is an outcome of the previous clause i.e. naming of the equation after him. This meaning is incorrect.

Kindly comment if my reasoning is correct ?

Thanks in advance :)

Dear spetznaz,

My friend, I'm happy to respond. :-)

Actually, comma + "giving" is perfectly correct. In fact, I would say that version (D) is 100% grammatically correct, but it is a rhetorical nightmare. Here's version (D):
(D) Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named for him, giving an explanation of the generation of the lift of an airplane’s wing, and made a discovery that led to an early method of measuring blood pressure.

Notice that version (D) is the longest of the five answer choices: that doesn't automatically mean an answer is wrong, but it's always a red flag that deserves our attention. Notice that version (D) is packed with nouns, nouns that are action words ("explanation," "generation"). As a general rule, a sentence is more compact and direct when the action words are in verb form. Putting action words in noun form is a way to make a choice sound bloated, weak, and indirect. For example, why on earth would we say "giving an explanation" rather than simply "explaining"? Even one action-word-as-noun is problematic, but this choice has two in a row! Holy mackerel! Choice (D) seems as if it is trying to win a contest to be the most rambling, verbose, and mealy-mouthed of the five answer choices. Yes, it's 100% grammatically correct, but rhetorically it's such a disaster that it should be taken out back and shot!

Remember that the GMAT SC is NOT purely a test a grammar. Instead, on the GMAT SC, grammar and logic and rhetoric are three equally important strands, and a student can't afford to ignore any of these.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 23 Jan 2016
Posts: 190
Location: India
GPA: 3.2
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jul 2017, 13:31
im still unable to understand why A is incorrect. Firstly, isnt it unidiomatic to say 'named for him'? Secondly, DB deriving a formula to explain the generation of lift seems logical to me as a lay man without physics or history background. So the only reason to eliminate A according to me would be the concentrated adjectives in 'airplane's wing's generation of lift', which seems awkward.

Any correction or clarity on the above would be appreciated.
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jul 2017, 21:29
1
OreoShake wrote:
im still unable to understand why A is incorrect. Firstly, isnt it unidiomatic to say 'named for him'? Secondly, DB deriving a formula to explain the generation of lift seems logical to me as a lay man without physics or history background. So the only reason to eliminate A according to me would be the concentrated adjectives in 'airplane's wing's generation of lift', which seems awkward.

Any correction or clarity on the above would be appreciated.

Dear OreoShake,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

Think about this structure
{person] did X to do Y
That structure is the infinitive of purpose. It implies intentionality. It implies that the person, in undertaking action X, had the explicit purpose of accomplishing Y.

Consider the sentences:
1) Washington crossed the Delaware to stage a surprise attack on the Hessians.
This first is logical and historically accurate. That's precisely what Washington was trying to do that night.
2) Washington crossed the Delaware to look heroic in a painting.
This one is patently absurd. Yes, one of the many consequences of Washington's action is that, much later, he cut a particularly heroic figure in a painting. Nevertheless, phrasing this with an infinitive of purpose is absurd, because the very last thing on Washington's mind on that stressful evening was how some artist would paint it more than half a century later.

Now, if you think that's absurd, consider (A) from this problem.
Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named after him, to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift, and made a discovery that led to an early method of measuring blood pressure.
Yes, the structure "an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift" is less than ideal and probably would not be part of a correct answer, although it's hard to say whether this alone would disqualify an answer choice. The BIG problem with (A) is the absurd implication of intentionality. You don't have to have advanced technical knowledge about the history of science, but you have to have the basic idea that in the eighteenth century, there were no airplanes. To say that Bernoulli was trying to explain something about airplanes, that one of his explicit intentions in deriving the equation was to explain airplanes, is absurd, because the airplane didn't come into existence until more than a century after his death. There is no way he could have know anything about airplanes, so there is no way he could be trying to explain anything about them. That's the big problem with (A).

Remember, on the GMAT SC, an effective sentence is one in which grammar and logic and rhetoric all work together to produce meaning.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 369
Location: Singapore
Concentration: Strategy, Finance
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jul 2017, 04:30
mikemcgarry wrote:
Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named after him, to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift, and made a discovery that led to an early method of measuring blood pressure.
(A) equation named after him, to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift
(B) equation named after him, and this principle explains the lift of an airplane’s wing
(C) equation, named it after himself, explained how an airplane’s wing is generating lift
(D) equation named for him, giving an explanation of the generation of the lift of an airplane’s wing
(E) equation named for him, which explains how an airplane’s wing generates lift


Folks sometimes think of GMAT SC in terms of grammar only, but the SC is as much about logic as it is about grammar. The splits in this question are less about grammatical errors and more about logical problems. For a discussion of logic in GMAT SC questions, more practice questions of this sort, and the OE of this particular question, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/logical-sp ... orrection/

Mike :-)


The story of this sentence is about a man named DB, who derived an equation and made a discovery that led to something.

A - Nothing wrong grammatically although the mammoth that are possessive's in this sentence could be avoided. Keep for NOW.
B - 'and this' creates a separate clause, and it's followed by another clause which breaks the entire flow of the sentence. It's better to use a modifier here, to explain what the equation does. OUT.
C - Clearly OUT. I laughed when I read this sentence. He derived an equation, then NAMED it after himself, then explained a phenomena, and finally made a discovery. Fake Parallelism that clearly destroy's the meaning of the sentence. OUT.
D - Extremely verbose. Giving an explanation is redundant. We could just say explains. OUT.
E - Nothing wrong grammatically. KEEP.

Now it's down to A & E.
The comparison is between intention Vs. explanation, so do we need an adverbial phrase to show intent, or a noun-modifier to explain what the equation does.
I chose E because it was more succinct, and later I did realise that airplanes did not exist back in 1700s so there could be no intent on DB's part to explain a wing's lift.

mikemcgarry
My question is with regards to the phrase, "to explain....." in option A. Is that an adverbial modifier?
_________________

Put in the work, and that dream score is yours!

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jul 2017, 10:08
1
akshayk wrote:
mikemcgarry
My question is with regards to the phrase, "to explain....." in option A. Is that an adverbial modifier?

Dear akshayk,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, did you see in the post immediate before yours that I explained that this was an infinitive of purpose. Yes, the infinitive of purpose is one kind of verb modifier, one kind of adverbial modifier. Because it makes clear the purpose of an action, it is always modifying a verb.

It's obvious that you are quite intelligent and have great potential. Before you ask a question on a thread, it's always good to check to what extent that issue already has been discussed. This sort of thoroughness is one of the aspects of asking an excellent question, and of course, that's one of the habits of excellence. Remember: how you do anything is how you do everything.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 02 Apr 2014
Posts: 474
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V34
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2017, 11:08
Hi Mike,
Actually i chose option A, as i didnt know "named for him" is a correct idiom.
Also , "equation named after him, to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift", is n't an example of using inifinity of purpose?, did bernoulli derive the equation to explain the lift. Please help me eliminate option A.
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2017, 13:08
hellosanthosh2k2 wrote:
Hi Mike,
Actually i chose option A, as i didnt know "named for him" is a correct idiom.
Also , "equation named after him, to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift", is n't an example of using inifinity of purpose?, did bernoulli derive the equation to explain the lift. Please help me eliminate option A.

Dear hellosanthosh2k2,

i"m happy to respond. :-)

First of all, "named for him" and "named after him" are both 100% correct idioms. You may find helpful these free GMAT Idiom Flashcards.

Yes, the phrase "to explain an airplane’s wing’s generation of lift" is an infinitive of purpose. It's also a gorgeously awkward phrase--it's hard for two possessives in a row not to be astonishingly awkward. That's problem #1 with (A), a rhetorical problem. Then problem #2 is the logical problem. The infinitive of purpose implies that the actor had conscious intention to so something. Well, the question very conveniently gives Mr. Bernoulli's dates, in the 18th century. You don't need to have a detailed knowledge of history, but you need to have the gist that there were no airplanes in the eighteen century--airplanes didn't come along to the 20th century, so someone two centuries earlier would have had no knowledge of them and therefore could form no purposes regarding them. Thus, the infinitive of purpose is illogical in (A).

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

SVP
SVP
avatar
P
Joined: 12 Dec 2016
Posts: 1652
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V33
GPA: 3.64
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Dec 2017, 17:19
mikemcgarry,
why "which" does not refer to fluid?
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Dec 2017, 16:36
2
chesstitans wrote:
mikemcgarry,
why "which" does not refer to fluid?

Dear chesstitans,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

In the construction "fluid equation," we have a pair of nouns in which one is essentially modifying the other. Even though "fluid" is a noun, in a way it is acting like an adjective here. It's subordinate to the second noun, "equation." Because the second noun has rhetorical priority, no modifier would ever pass over it to refer to the first noun.

Rhetorical priority is an underestimated dimension of pronoun-antecedent agreement.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 3505
Premium Member
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Dec 2018, 06:56
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named &nbs [#permalink] 10 Dec 2018, 06:56

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 33 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782) derived the famous fluid equation named

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.