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Out of Americas obsession with all things pet-related have grown a

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New post Updated on: 26 Jan 2018, 06:05
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Out of America’s obsession with all things pet-related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing forth rhinestone studded collars, cashmere dog sweaters, and canopied pet beds.

(A) things pet-related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

(B) things pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that is bringing

(C) things that are pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

(D) pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

(E) pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

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Originally posted by aiming4mba on 22 Jul 2010, 11:53.
Last edited by hazelnut on 26 Jan 2018, 06:05, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question.
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New post 22 Jul 2010, 12:09
Got B. Not too sure if this is a 700 level question - seemed too easy?

Ok, this was what went through my head....

D and E, out of the picture. Idiom mistake and when you read it in your head it doesn't make sense at all when read "pet-related things"

So you're down to A, B, and C.

C is somewhat redundant with the use of "that" - eliminated.

So you're down to A and B.

I started to compare to the two and saw that included "is" and one included "are" implying subject-verb agreement error.

The subject of this statement deals with "America's obsession", which is singular. I guess the tricky part here is that they list all the examples and try to confuse you that it might be somehow plural. tricky tricky :D

So in the end, B it is. Done. Lemme know if that's how you guy thought about it as.
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New post 23 Jul 2010, 01:36
I pick B.

The Verb of the verb "bring" is "a market", therefore it needs to be a singular verb form. Only B where the Verb is "IS" agree with "a market".

B rules
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Re: Out of Americas obsession with all things pet-related have grown a  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2011, 15:10
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The correct answer is option B.

The subject 'market' which is singular agrees in number with the verb 'has'. Moreover, the tense in the original sentence suggests that the action is ongoing and hence the verb form 'bringing' is correct.

In option E, though the subject 'market' agrees with the verb 'has', it does not agree with the verb 'bring' which is plural. Hence it is incorrect.

Hope this helps!
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New post 28 Jul 2016, 06:24
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aiming4mba wrote:
Out of America’s obsession with all things pet-related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing forth rhinestone studded collars, cashmere dog sweaters, and canopied pet beds.
A. things pet-related have grown a market for human-inspired acessories and accoutrements that are bringing
B. things pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that is bringing
C. things that are pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring
D. pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing
E. pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring


A and D are out SV agreement obsession-has
C and E are out again because of SV agreement market-that-brings/bringing
Correct ans B...
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New post 02 Nov 2017, 02:19
Request experts to explain the OA..and things wrong about C and E
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Re: Out of Americas obsession with all things pet-related have grown a  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2017, 12:23
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Luckisnoexcuse wrote:
Request experts to explain the OA..and things wrong about C and E

This one is tricky! And I have no memory of ever running into it on the GMATPrep tests -- can anybody out there confirm the source? It looks legit, but I've seen most of the older GMATPrep SCs hundreds of times... so I'm surprised to see one that doesn't ring a bell at all, especially since it's pretty tough. Maybe that brain cell died in a tragic bourbon accident?

Anyway, on to your question. I know that you asked specifically about (C) and (E), but I think the heart of the question shows up in (A) as well. So I'll go through all of the answer choices, QOTD-style.

Quote:
A. things pet-related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

The subject-verb thing is kind of tricky, because the subject comes after the verb. In this case: "a market... have grown" makes no sense.

The word "that" also jumps out at me. It seems like the modifier beginning with "that" ("that are bringing forth rhinestone collars, cashmere dog sweaters...") is modifying "accessories and accoutrements." And that makes no sense: it's not the "accessories and accoutrements" that are "bringing forth" fancy collars and sweaters and beds. The MARKET "brings forth" those things; not the accessories and accoutrements themselves. So this is tricky, but we need "that" to be followed by a singular verb, since it's the (singular) market performing the action of "bringing forth" fancy pet stuff.

The "that" modifier is tricky, but it's the key to the question, after you figure out the subject-verb thing. Anyway, (A) is out.

Quote:
B. things pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that is bringing

"Has" gives us the correct subject-verb agreement, and notice that the end of the underlined portion is now singular: "a market... that is bringing forth [expensive dog crap]..." That makes way more sense than (A). And the verb tense is OK, too: "is bringing" suggests an ongoing action in the present, and that actually makes sense here, because the current obsession is inspiring a market for fancy dog products right now.

So we can keep (B).

Quote:
C. things that are pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

This sounds great! "A market... has grown" gives us the right subject-verb agreement. "...accessories and accoutrements [plural!] that bring..." sounds great, but it's wrong, as we described in (A): it's the market that "brings forth" the crazy expensive dog stuff, not the "accessories and accoutrements" themselves.

(By the way, if you ever use the word "accoutrements" in a real-life sentence, Americans will generally assume that you're a pretentious dork.)

Quote:
D. pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

Subject-verb is wrong in the beginning ("a market... have grown") and also in the end: just like in (A) and (C), this suggests that the "accessories and accoutrements" are "bringing forth" pretentious pet products. (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

Same issue again as in (A), (C), and (D)! It's the market that brings forth the fancy collars and sweaters -- not the "accessories and accoutrements."

I hope this helps!
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New post 24 Dec 2018, 22:00
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This is not an original GMAT Prep source question. Let's us get to the roots.
Quote:
The original OG's version --- OG #116.

Out of America's fascination with all things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing back the chaise lounge, the overstuffed sofa, and the claw-footed bathtub.

A) things antique have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
B) things antique has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that is bringing
C) things that are antiques has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
D) antique things have grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that are bringing
E) antique things has grown a market for bygone styles of furniture and fixtures that bring
The OA is B




Princeton's version

Quote:
Out of this season's obsession with all things political have grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that are flooding the shops with t-shirts, bumper stickers and lapel pins.

A. things political have grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that are flooding
B. things political has grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that is flooding
C. things that are political has grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that floods
D. political things have grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that are flooding
E. political things has grown a market for official memorabilia and trinkets that floods

In this, also the OA is B.[/u]


Now Kaplan’s is the next simulation with the order of the choices slightly changed.

Quote:
Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing “regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

A. other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
B. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which are bringing
C. another people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
D. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which is bringing
E. other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows, which bring

Kaplan’s OA is D. (the same as B in other questions)




This is Ron’s response to the Kaplan’s

Quote:
Lunarpower wrote in Beat theGMAT
ssgmatter wrote:
Out of the public's interest in the details of and conflicts in other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that are bringing "regular" people onto the television screen with increasing frequency.

(A) other people's lives have grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that are bringing
(B) other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that are bringing
(C) another person's life has grown a booming market for a "reality" television show that is bringing
(D) other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that is bringing
(E) other people's lives has grown a booming market for "reality" television shows that bring

this is a rip-off of OG11 #116... and not a very good one. a legitimate case could be made for either (b) or (d).
here's the analysis:

1) THE SUBJECT OF "HAS/HAVE GROWN" IS "A BOOMING MARKET"
the entire cluster of words that precedes this verb is a prepositional phrase, and so can't contain the subject. therefore, this must be a reverse construction, in which the subject comes after the verb.
the subject is, therefore "a booming market".

this is also the only subject that is reasonable in context -- nothing else in the sentence has "grown".)

therefore, the correct verb is "has".

simpler analogy:
on the table (is / are) two cell phones. ,
"on the table" isn't the subject (it's a prepositional phrase, so that's impossible). therefore, the subject, "two cell phones", FOLLOWS the verb. (the correct choice would be "are".)



2) THERE IS INSUFFICIENT CONTEXT TO DETERMINE THE SUBJECT OF "IS/ARE BRINGING"

...aaaaaaaannnnndd this is where we start to have a problem.

in the current context, BOTH of these are perfectly reasonable interpretations:

* the market (for reality tv shows) IS bringing people onto the screen increasingly frequently;
* the tv shows themselves ARE bringing people onto the screen increasingly frequently.

they're also both grammatical, since "that" modifiers have a certain degree of freedom in their application -- unlike "which" modifiers, they aren't constrained to modifying the closest noun. (see OG DIAGNOSTIC #50, in the 11th or 12th edition, for another example of a flexible "that" modifier.)

therefore, it is impossible to tell which of these is the intended subject -- both are reasonable in context -- and, therefore, it's impossible to determine whether the verb should be singular or plural.

therefore, either (b) or (d).

what's the source of this question?
you would think that people who are essentially copying an OG problem, and substituting different words, could, at least, make a problem with only one correct answer.
heh.


Now one more copycat


Quote:
Out of America’s obsession with all things pet-related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing forth rhinestone studded collars, cashmere dog sweaters, and canopied pet beds.


A. things pet-related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing
B. things pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that is bringing
C. things that are pet-related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that bring
D. pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing
E. pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that bring
B is said to be the answer to this topic also.

.
It is distressing to see how many people are vying for a bite of it. Ron has analyzed the issue threadbare and given a nail-hitting answer. Simulators please note
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New post 06 Apr 2019, 17:57
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Out of America's obsession with all things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing forth rhinestone-studded collars, cashmere dog sweaters, and canopied pet beds.

A. things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing

B. things pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that is bringing

C. things that are pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that bring

D. pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing

E. pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that bring

Source: KAPLAN Q-Bank

It may be difficult to identify the subject, "a market," in this sentence because of the inverted word order. If you spot the verb, "have grown," you can find the subject by asking, What's grown? The market for certain pet supplies, apparently. Be alert to incorrect verb number and tense.

The plural verb "have grown" does not agree with "market," a singular noun. A market has grown, not have grown. That eliminates (A) and (D). "Market" is also the subject of the second verb, which should be "is bringing" rather than "are bringing." (C) and (E) change the verb to "bring," which is certainly more concise. However, this change makes it seem like the accessories and accouterments bring forth the listed items, which is not logically correct. It should be clear that the growing market is bringing forth those items. That eliminates (C) and (E), leaving (B) as the correct answer.

TAKEAWAY: Be careful of unusual sentence structures. It is not common for the subject to come after the verb. However, when it does, the subject and verb still need to match in number



I answered E. According to the official explanation, the answer is B because the verb "is bringing" is better than "bring". I don't understand the official explanation that says "bring" is wrong because the verb "bring" makes it seem like the accessories and accouterments bring forth the listed items, which is not logically correct. Doesn't that also apply for "is bringing" in letter B?
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New post 06 Apr 2019, 20:02
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Diwabag wrote:
Out of America's obsession with all things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing forth rhinestone-studded collars, cashmere dog sweaters, and canopied pet beds.

A. things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

B. things pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that is bringing

C. things that are pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

D. pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

E. pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

Source: KAPLAN Q-Bank

It may be difficult to identify the subject, "a market," in this sentence because of the inverted word order. If you spot the verb, "have grown," you can find the subject by asking, What's grown? The market for certain pet supplies, apparently. Be alert to incorrect verb number and tense.

The plural verb "have grown" does not agree with "market," a singular noun. A market has grown, not have grown. That eliminates (A) and (D). "Market" is also the subject of the second verb, which should be "is bringing" rather than "are bringing." (C) and (E) change the verb to "bring," which is certainly more concise. However, this change makes it seem like the accessories and accouterments [sic] bring forth the listed items, which is not logically correct. It should be clear that the growing market is bringing forth those items. That eliminates (C) and (E), leaving (B) as the correct answer.

TAKEAWAY: Be careful of unusual sentence structures. It is not common for the subject to come after the verb. However, when it does, the subject and verb still need to match in number


Diwabag , first, as I said earlier, welcome to GMAT Club!
(Sorry that I mistook your post for a duplicate.)

This Kaplan question is almost identical to this official question, here.

From part of the explanation given (see my highlight under the spoiler), I can see why you might think that there is little difference between
is bringing in B and bring in C and E.

There are two important differences between B on the one hand, and C and E on the other hand.
The author of the OE does not mention these differences.

1) Options C and E contain subject/verb disagreement.
Market is singular. The verb should be brings, not bring.
The point about logic is true. But subject/verb disagreement is easy to spot.
If the S/V disagreement had been explicitly mentioned in the OE, it would have been clear that (C) and (E) contain an error that (B) does not.

2) GMAC usually prefers passive voice if inanimate things have effect
but are paired with a verb such as bring forth that requires human agency.
-- A market itself cannot "bring forth" anything. People responding to the market bring things forth.
See below.
-- We use the passive voice "is bringing" in (B) as a convention in this kind of situation.

Bring (forth) is a weird verb phrase to be using in this context, but we will work with it.

• Process of Elimination

• Split #1 Subject/verb agreement

The subject of the first clause is market.

Options A and D incorrectly pair the singular market with plural have grown.
Correct: Out of America's obsession . . . HAS grown a market . . .

Eliminate A and D

The subject of the second clause (a that-clause) in C and E is still market.

... market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

Market is the antecedent for the relative pronoun that.
Get rid of the prepositional stuff.

Wrong: ... market ... that bring. . .

Correct: ... market . . . that brings . . .

Eliminate options C and E.

• Split #2 - strategically, the answer must be (B) because C and E are the same
Options C and E are almost identical.
Their difference does not make a difference in terms of a decision point.

Tactically, we really have only one choice left from options B, C, and E.
Option (B) is different. Its verb is different.
Options C and E are almost entirely the same, including their that-clause verbs.
Eliminate nearly identical options C and E.

• By POE, the answer is B

• Option B also correctly uses the passive voice.

In English and on the GMAT, inanimate objects cannot perform human tasks.

When inanimate things "do" the action of a verb that requires agency,
as a matter of convention
we write the sentence in the passive voice, as is the case in (B).

A market is a thing. A market itself cannot bring forth anything.

People responding to the market can create products
that are "brought forth" by the market mechanism.

But the market itself does not tote around cashmere dog sweaters and show them off for purchase,
as professionals at a marketing firm might do with advertisements.
The market itself does not find suppliers who make canopied beds for animals.

We signal that the market does not actively bring forth anything by using passive voice:
the market [passively, passive voice] is bringing forth . . .

Option (B) is the best choice because
-- the other four answers have subject-verb disagreement, and
-- the passive voice is usually better when an inanimate object is attached to an action verb

I hope that analysis helps.
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New post 06 Apr 2019, 23:45
Diwabag wrote:
Out of America's obsession with all things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing forth rhinestone-studded collars, cashmere dog sweaters, and canopied pet beds.

A. things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing

B. things pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that is bringing

C. things that are pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that bring

D. pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that are bringing

E. pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accouterments that bring

Source: KAPLAN Q-Bank

It may be difficult to identify the subject, "a market," in this sentence because of the inverted word order. If you spot the verb, "have grown," you can find the subject by asking, What's grown? The market for certain pet supplies, apparently. Be alert to incorrect verb number and tense.

The plural verb "have grown" does not agree with "market," a singular noun. A market has grown, not have grown. That eliminates (A) and (D). "Market" is also the subject of the second verb, which should be "is bringing" rather than "are bringing." (C) and (E) change the verb to "bring," which is certainly more concise. However, this change makes it seem like the accessories and accouterments bring forth the listed items, which is not logically correct. It should be clear that the growing market is bringing forth those items. That eliminates (C) and (E), leaving (B) as the correct answer.

TAKEAWAY: Be careful of unusual sentence structures. It is not common for the subject to come after the verb. However, when it does, the subject and verb still need to match in number


I answered E. According to the official explanation, the answer is B because the verb "is bringing" is better than "bring". I don't understand the official explanation that says "bring" is wrong because the verb "bring" makes it seem like the accessories and accouterments bring forth the listed items, which is not logically correct. Doesn't that also apply for "is bringing" in letter B?


Merging topics. Please check discussion above.
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New post 07 Apr 2019, 02:40
generis

This is truly helpful. Thanks for helping a beginner out. Cheers.
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New post 07 Apr 2019, 11:19
generis wrote:
Diwabag wrote:
Out of America's obsession with all things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing forth rhinestone-studded collars, cashmere dog sweaters, and canopied pet beds.

A. things pet related have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

B. things pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that is bringing

C. things that are pet related has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

D. pet-related things have grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that are bringing

E. pet-related things has grown a market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

Source: KAPLAN Q-Bank

It may be difficult to identify the subject, "a market," in this sentence because of the inverted word order. If you spot the verb, "have grown," you can find the subject by asking, What's grown? The market for certain pet supplies, apparently. Be alert to incorrect verb number and tense.

The plural verb "have grown" does not agree with "market," a singular noun. A market has grown, not have grown. That eliminates (A) and (D). "Market" is also the subject of the second verb, which should be "is bringing" rather than "are bringing." (C) and (E) change the verb to "bring," which is certainly more concise. However, this change makes it seem like the accessories and accouterments [sic] bring forth the listed items, which is not logically correct. It should be clear that the growing market is bringing forth those items. That eliminates (C) and (E), leaving (B) as the correct answer.

TAKEAWAY: Be careful of unusual sentence structures. It is not common for the subject to come after the verb. However, when it does, the subject and verb still need to match in number


Diwabag , first, as I said earlier, welcome to GMAT Club!
(Sorry that I mistook your post for a duplicate.)

This Kaplan question is almost identical to this official question, here.

From part of the explanation given (see my highlight under the spoiler), I can see why you might think that there is little difference between
is bringing in B and bring in C and E.

There are two important differences between B on the one hand, and C and E on the other hand.
The author of the OE does not mention these differences.

1) Options C and E contain subject/verb disagreement.
Market is singular. The verb should be brings, not bring.
The point about logic is true. But subject/verb disagreement is easy to spot.
If the S/V disagreement had been explicitly mentioned in the OE, it would have been clear that (C) and (E) contain an error that (B) does not.

2) GMAC usually prefers passive voice if inanimate things have effect
but are paired with a verb such as bring forth that requires human agency.
-- A market itself cannot "bring forth" anything. People responding to the market bring things forth.
See below.
-- We use the passive voice "is bringing" in (B) as a convention in this kind of situation.

Bring (forth) is a weird verb phrase to be using in this context, but we will work with it.

• Process of Elimination

• Split #1 Subject/verb agreement

The subject of the first clause is market.

Options A and D incorrectly pair the singular market with plural have grown.
Correct: Out of America's obsession . . . HAS grown a market . . .

Eliminate A and D

The subject of the second clause (a that-clause) in C and E is still market.

... market for human-inspired accessories and accoutrements that bring

Market is the antecedent for the relative pronoun that.
Get rid of the prepositional stuff.

Wrong: ... market ... that bring. . .

Correct: ... market . . . that brings . . .

Eliminate options C and E.

• Split #2 - strategically, the answer must be (B) because C and E are the same
Options C and E are almost identical.
Their difference does not make a difference in terms of a decision point.

Tactically, we really have only one choice left from options B, C, and E.
Option (B) is different. Its verb is different.
Options C and E are almost entirely the same, including their that-clause verbs.
Eliminate nearly identical options C and E.

• By POE, the answer is B

• Option B also correctly uses the passive voice.

In English and on the GMAT, inanimate objects cannot perform human tasks.

When inanimate things "do" the action of a verb that requires agency,
as a matter of convention
we write the sentence in the passive voice, as is the case in (B).

A market is a thing. A market itself cannot bring forth anything.

People responding to the market can create products
that are "brought forth" by the market mechanism.

But the market itself does not tote around cashmere dog sweaters and show them off for purchase,
as professionals at a marketing firm might do with advertisements.
The market itself does not find suppliers who make canopied beds for animals.

We signal that the market does not actively bring forth anything by using passive voice:
the market [passively, passive voice] is bringing forth . . .

Option (B) is the best choice because
-- the other four answers have subject-verb disagreement, and
-- the passive voice is usually better when an inanimate object is attached to an action verb

I hope that analysis helps.

I'm really confused , how "is bringing " is a passive voice :\
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New post 07 Apr 2019, 19:10
mike2100 wrote:
I'm really confused , how "is bringing " is a passive voice :\
I think that was a small oversight. Is bringing is not passive (that would be is being brought).
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